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Paranoia of people in the states

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Paranoia of people in the states

Postby ssjparris » Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:11 am

i was searching for the search terms american women paranoid. and i found this thread on the rooshv forum. here is a great quote i actually liked alot. because it speaks volumes of the fear here in the states. especially california fear is huge....any way look at this guys post below about paranoid america...

http://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-4561.html

" I met an American who calls it "stranger danger" and yeah, I don't see it nearly as much outside the US.

People are just afraid of each other in the US. Neighbours usually don't talk or even really know each other. People walking down the street in the middle of the day still watch their back. Everyone is suspicious of each other's intentions.

Most places abroad it is totally different. You go to a restaurant and if all the tables are taken you can just sit at someone else's table and they won't care. Imagine doing that in the US. Some people would freak out. Similarly, people are much more likely to engage in conversation with strangers, even women in some places wouldn't get their panties in a bunch if they had to talk to a male because they sat next to him on a bus or something. And in crowded areas people don't mind as much if someone bumps into them, whereas in the US that is a major problem.

So overall it's sorta sad. The US has created this society where people are so afraid of each other that it impacts so many little aspects of life. I never realized this until I got out and started travelling long term abroad. It is sad. "
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Postby Ghost » Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:32 am

Decades of "all men are rapists and murderers," breakdowns and dissolution of real communities, and the gov-sponsored boogeyman of terrorism...and voila! A paranoid, fearful society of widespread, ingrained neuroses!
(But at least they are still of some use as worker drones and tax cattle for the corpgov complex)
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Re: Paranoia of people in the states

Postby jamesbond » Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:08 am

ssjparris wrote:i was searching for the search terms american women paranoid. and i found this thread on the rooshv forum. here is a great quote i actually liked alot. because it speaks volumes of the fear here in the states. especially california fear is huge....any way look at this guys post below about paranoid america...

http://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-4561.html

I just read that thread and the responses were right on the mark! This is exactly the kind of stuff we talk about here on this forum. Here was one response in regards the paranoia american women exhibit towards men.

"I'm glad to see I'm not the only person who's been experiencing this problem. It only took a handful of dates to convince me that many American women are simply afraid to date. I always thought the problem was me but it turns out that many American women think everyone is a potential "creeper". I imagine this is what is keeping a lot of men from getting aggressive in the field. They're too scared to come off as the potential rapist. Coming to realize that approaching women is not "wrong" was the most important thing to happen to me in recent years.

This contrasted greatly with an experience I had years prior while abroad in Italy. I met an Italian girl on a hike there and she was holding my arm walking through dark streets after only knowing me two days. My first thought was "Lady, what if I rape you or something?" I cared more than she did. She was personal and kind from the start.

These experiences have greatly shaped my perception of American women."
"When I think about the idea of getting involved with an American woman, I don't know if I should laugh .............. or vomit!"

"Trying to meet women in America is like trying to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics."
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Postby jamesbond » Tue Nov 06, 2012 1:37 pm

Ghost wrote:Decades of "all men are rapists and murderers," breakdowns and dissolution of real communities, and the gov-sponsored boogeyman of terrorism...and voila! A paranoid, fearful society of widespread, ingrained neuroses!
(But at least they are still of some use as worker drones and tax cattle for the corpgov complex)


Women are getting messages from the media every day that all men are potential rapists, murders and robbers. This puts fearful thoughts in a woman's head and eventually she may believe that every man she meets (whether it's in a bar, party, at work or bookstore) could be a rapist, murder or robber.

In other countries, these messages from the media are not put out, so the women in those countries do not have an unnatural fear of men (thank God). No wonder why the women are so approchable in the Philippines, South America, eastern Europe and Russia. :D
"When I think about the idea of getting involved with an American woman, I don't know if I should laugh .............. or vomit!"

"Trying to meet women in America is like trying to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics."
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Postby Teal Lantern » Tue Nov 06, 2012 1:57 pm

jamesbond wrote:Women are getting messages from the media every day that all men are potential rapists, murders and robbers. This puts fearful thoughts in a woman's head and eventually she may believe that every man she meets (whether it's in a bar, party, at work or bookstore) could be a rapist, murder or robber.


I get the message that ameriskanks are all false rape accusers and avoid them accordingly. :D
http://register-her.com/index.php?title ... e_Accusers
не поглеждай назад. 8)

"Even an American judge is unlikely to award child support for imputed children." - FredOnEverything
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Postby golgi » Fri Nov 23, 2012 7:04 am

Bonus points to whoever can discern the political-end to having a society wherein trust is non-existant in the general-population. Think about what the root of political power is.
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Postby abcdavid01 » Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:26 pm

This starts early. The whole "stranger danger" thing is what they teach Kindergartners in these videos. They get it in their little heads that if they talk to any stranger, they'll get raped or worse. Anyone outside of immediate family, even if it's like an uncle, that's a rape. When I was like sixteen (16!) I was dropped off at a sports lesson by my dad. My mom was helping my aunt move out of her house, so she told my uncle to pick me up. I assumed she had told my dad that, but she didn't and he ended up freaking out. I was like, "I'm sixteen! It was uncle! What's wrong with you?" The parents are paranoid and teach their kids to be paranoid as well. I want no part of it. I'm interested in more than just what countries have the best women. American society is sterile in general. Harder to make friends with brainwashed people. I want to raise a family in a place without this paranoia because they teach it to kids as soon as they enter school here.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Psp9cj9LsQs[/youtube]

Search "Stranger Danger" on Youtube. Tons of videos like this.

From the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children:

http://us.missingkids.com/missingkids/s ... ageId=2034

When we tell children to “never talk to strangers,â€￾ we have effectively eliminated a key source of help for them if they are in trouble. If they’re lost they may be surrounded by many “strangersâ€￾ who could conceivably help them if they would only ask for it. Since we know parents and guardians can’t be with their children every second of the day, we need to give children “safety netsâ€￾ of people they can go to if they need help. Those individuals may include uniformed law-enforcement or security officers; a store salesperson with a nametag; the person in an information booth at a mall or other public venue; or a mother with children.


Children take these messages literally and grow up believing they shouldn't talk to any strangers. It's more than just about helpful strangers though. There are long term effects because children are prevented from learning socialization and this becomes something they can carry for life.

Article from Time:

http://healthland.time.com/2012/06/11/s ... ut-safety/

Sounds like something I would do. Sit on a park bench and watch children play soccer. Does that make me a creep?
Last edited by abcdavid01 on Fri Nov 23, 2012 7:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby golgi » Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:46 pm

Eastern/Central Europe or Southeast Asia would be your best bets for traditional family-village culture and relative lack of or yet ineffective government brainwashing triumph over traditional culture. Specific Latin American locations might be good as well: Chile being the stand-out all-around contender for me, although I am less apprised of its current cultural state than any other recommended location. I don't think that Eastern/Central Europe has too much longer until it is culturally westernized. Maybe one more generation.

There are other places, but they will be either more undeveloped than the above mentioned locales or too dangerous for long term settlement (certain island chains, Africa). The catch is that in almost all of the holdouts, across the board, except in the most undeveloped places and with the most naive populations, you will run into nationalism/xenophobia that is in place in-part to resist the cultural changes that you are trying to escape. Fact: people don't trust each other in a nation full of ethnic/cultural strangers. This lack of community trust leads to an awful emotional quality of life for the populace, but it better assures political control of the ownership class because the population doesn't trust one another enough to be truly effective at community co-operation and therefore political organization. Therefore, the populace can never gain any true political power: power that most often needs to be built over-generations in a community. This includes the necessary powers of political determination (belief in the cause), finance/assets, organizational efficiency, and organizational reach. This is impossible in communities wherein trust is absent.
Last edited by golgi on Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby abcdavid01 » Fri Nov 23, 2012 4:55 pm

I'm an oddity, though I don't know if that's good or not. Half Eastern European, half Asian, but I've never been outside of NA, so I don't know how I'd be received. I'm trying to resist American brainwashing, so cohesion to local culture would be my goal anyway. That fact about multiculturalism is certainly insightful.
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Postby golgi » Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:01 pm

If you like the culture (you'll know within the first six months), South Korea offers an excellent village type culture in a relatively advanced and peaceful nation. As a bonus, you can easily get a well-paying job there to test the waters. South Korean women are effing hot as well, and you'll never have a better bedroom experience. Negative: the winter cold is bone chilling, its not as advanced as Japan, and it's not as developed outside of the major cities. Japan might be good as well, as it is more developed than is the USA, but your equivalent pay will not go as far and then there's the whole Fukishima thing. I enjoy Japan more, but Korea is certainly easier to get started in. You could eventually try both. Southeast Asia is good is you have income from outside of the country. I don't believe that cultural trust will be eroded in these incredibly insular countries anytime soon. Asia, across the board, is the best bet for traditional community values. The poorer you go, the more you will have to worry about being a victim of a gold-digger. Better to find a wealthy woman in northeast Asia, or Singapore, who will want to take care of you in exchange for your particular non-financial qualities that you can offer.
Last edited by golgi on Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby abcdavid01 » Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:08 pm

Thanks for the tip. Isn't Japan still in that never-ending recession though? Same as U.S.
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Postby golgi » Fri Nov 23, 2012 5:19 pm

Japan has the third largest economy in the world. Except for the period between 2005 and 2010, in which the GDP shrunk slightly, it has been booming since WWII. On a relative scale, it's really impossible to do much better than betting on the economy of Japan. Take that perspective and now add the fact that you will be a member of a very limited labor pool, relative to the local population. Japan is absolutely the best place in Asia in which to have opportunity outside of ESL teaching, although it will also take creativity and tenacity to do so. Their ESL standards, at least for desirable post-secondary positions, are high. If you want a dynamic career in ESL, then Korea is a better choice due to the higher demand there.

When looking at the economy of a country, I like to look at the GDP per person (PPP), and then add points for more people. You essentially want a country with the greatest amount of highly paid people, when evaluating an economy for a potential move. Then you would cross-reference for the amount of jobs offered/available in your field. You want to go where there are a lot, which will assure that you will remain in high demand, maximize your pay, and minimize potential fallout from a bad work experience (not have to leave the country). A huge advantage to Japan is that once you have a work visa, you can work anywhere and change jobs. In Korea, you are locked into one employer. If it doesn't work out, you have to get a new visa. You will be able to get a new job, but you will likely lose 1-3 months in the process before all of the paperwork is in place.
Last edited by golgi on Sat Nov 24, 2012 6:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Voice of Reason » Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:28 pm

The indoctrination all starts from a young age and extends into adulthood.

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Postby Voice of Reason » Fri Nov 23, 2012 6:37 pm

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XlqudTC--I[/youtube]
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Postby Renata » Thu Nov 29, 2012 5:32 pm

growing up when we heard about America all we could think about was Disney World & all the Magic associated with it.
it's a big shame though about america to produce something so sweet, and on the flip side to have all this darkness :(

I think people are trained to live in fear of many things from early on, thus all the paranoia.
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