Join John Adams, world renowned Intl Matchmaker, Monday nights 8:30 EST for Live Webcasts!
And check out Five Reasons why you should attend a FREE AFA Seminar! See locations and dates here.



View Active Topics       View Your Posts       Latest 100 Topics       FAQ Topics       Switch to Mobile


Help with Algebra

Discuss and talk about any general topic.

Moderators: fschmidt, jamesbond

Help with Algebra

Postby zacb » January 27th, 2013, 3:52 pm

I know this may be off topic, but I want to study Algebra over summer break so that I am not overwhelmed when I have to take it the second time around. So here is my question: my dad mentioned before that he had a certain book before he learned Algebra from. And he mentioned something about how they had switched how they had taught math, and the new type was hard (new math and old math). So what is the difference, and what is the best way to learn Algebra? (Since I was never really good at it, and I want to try my hand at it). My major thing tends to be the factoring that gets me off track.
The Daily Agorist, Learn to Live Independent of the System! http://www.theagoristreview.blogspot.com
zacb
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1521
Joined: June 21st, 2012, 4:33 am
Location: Michigan

Postby MrPeabody » January 27th, 2013, 6:48 pm

There is a free Internet course on Algebra which starts tomorrow.

https://www.coursera.org/course/algebra
MrPeabody
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1277
Joined: April 13th, 2008, 7:53 pm

Postby Jester » January 27th, 2013, 10:23 pm

am not an expert on good sources for "old math", but as the son of a mathematician, I can tell you that "old math" is generally the answer. Less mysterious, more practical, more intuitive.

two quick ideas:

-- When you see a variable ("X") or a constant ("B") represented by a letter, just pretend it is a door with the real number hidden behind it, or a compartment with the real number hidden inside it. Solving the equation is often a matter of figuring out what's behind the door.

-- Use the units. If you have to figure out how many miles a car can go at 60 mph in 3 hors, put the units into the equation, and cancel units like you cancel numbers or variables:

(60 miles/hour) x 3 hours ------> (60 x 3 miles) x (1/hour) x (hour) ------> 180 miles x 1 -------> 180 miles.
Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 7874
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Re: Help with Algebra

Postby Teal Lantern » January 28th, 2013, 5:23 pm

zacb wrote:I know this may be off topic, but I want to study Algebra over summer break so that I am not overwhelmed when I have to take it the second time around. So here is my question: my dad mentioned before that he had a certain book before he learned Algebra from. And he mentioned something about how they had switched how they had taught math, and the new type was hard (new math and old math). So what is the difference, and what is the best way to learn Algebra? (Since I was never really good at it, and I want to try my hand at it). My major thing tends to be the factoring that gets me off track.


https://www.khanacademy.org/
Scroll down a bit to where it says Algebra.
-OR-
https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebr ... to-algebra

We're used to you being a bit off topic. :lol:
не поглеждай назад. 8)

"Even an American judge is unlikely to award child support for imputed children." - FredOnEverything
User avatar
Teal Lantern
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2766
Joined: August 14th, 2012, 12:48 am
Location: Briar Patch, Universe 25

Postby zacb » January 28th, 2013, 11:20 pm

What do you think of older math books? Would those be as useful, or would they still be the same as modern math books? I ran across this book at the library's free book table, and I took it. I am wondering if it might be easier or not. I shall see!
The Daily Agorist, Learn to Live Independent of the System! http://www.theagoristreview.blogspot.com
zacb
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1521
Joined: June 21st, 2012, 4:33 am
Location: Michigan

Postby Teal Lantern » January 29th, 2013, 12:35 am

zacb wrote:What do you think of older math books? Would those be as useful, or would they still be the same as modern math books? I ran across this book at the library's free book table, and I took it. I am wondering if it might be easier or not. I shall see!


"Older" than ... what?
Gotta give us a publishing date or ISBN or something. :?
Any math book from the 20th century should be fine.
не поглеждай назад. 8)

"Even an American judge is unlikely to award child support for imputed children." - FredOnEverything
User avatar
Teal Lantern
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2766
Joined: August 14th, 2012, 12:48 am
Location: Briar Patch, Universe 25

Postby zacb » January 29th, 2013, 5:04 pm

Sorry :D. 1960s or prior. Sorry about that.
The Daily Agorist, Learn to Live Independent of the System! http://www.theagoristreview.blogspot.com
zacb
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1521
Joined: June 21st, 2012, 4:33 am
Location: Michigan

Postby Jester » January 30th, 2013, 10:21 am

Older math books will take a different approach to same basic material. Useful if studied in addition to what you will get in your course. Like crosstraining your mind.

I'm sure you've thought of it, but why not get the text from the course youre going to take, and work through the whole thing yourself?

Another trick is to do all the exercises in a book, whether a professor assigns them or not. Practice makes perfect.

Another trick is to show all your steps when you work a problem. Never skip a step.
"Well actually, she's not REALLY my daughter. But she does like to call me Daddy... at certain moments..."
Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 7874
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Postby zacb » January 30th, 2013, 5:05 pm

Appreciate the help :D .
The Daily Agorist, Learn to Live Independent of the System! http://www.theagoristreview.blogspot.com
zacb
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1521
Joined: June 21st, 2012, 4:33 am
Location: Michigan


Return to General Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests