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Average Work Hours

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Average Work Hours

Postby abcdavid01 » Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:10 pm

Consider a typical working day in the medieval period. It stretched from dawn to dusk (sixteen hours in summer and eight in winter), but, as the Bishop Pilkington has noted, work was intermittent -called to a halt for breakfast, lunch, the customary afternoon nap, and dinner. Depending on time and place, there were also midmorning and midafternoon refreshment breaks. These rest periods were the traditional rights of laborers, which they enjoyed even during peak harvest times. During slack periods, which accounted for a large part of the year, adherence to regular working hours was not usual. According to Oxford Professor James E. Thorold Rogers[1], the medieval workday was not more than eight hours.

...

The contrast between capitalist and precapitalist work patterns is most striking in respect to the working year. The medieval calendar was filled with holidays. Official -- that is, church -- holidays included not only long "vacations" at Christmas, Easter, and midsummer but also numerous saints' and rest days. These were spent both in sober churchgoing and in feasting, drinking and merrymaking.

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All told, holiday leisure time in medieval England took up probably about one-third of the year. And the English were apparently working harder than their neighbors. The ancien règime in France is reported to have guaranteed fifty-two Sundays, ninety rest days, and thirty-eight holidays. In Spain, travelers noted that holidays totaled five months per year.


http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/r ... kweek.html

The overall figures for how many hours a week the average American works have been held down by the increasing number of part-time service and retail jobs in the economy. But since many of the part-time jobs have been filled by the increasing number of women in the workforce, and many of these women had previously been housewives, there are fewer hours when anyone is taking care of household chores.

Instead of coming home to find the refrigerator and cupboards stocked, dinner ready, the table set, the clothes washed, the house clean and the children entertained, men are coming home and finding they have to chip in, because their wives aren't "the little woman," anymore. They are now sharing duties as breadwinner, which means men have to share household chores. The situation is exaggerated when both spouses work full-time — particularly if they don't earn enough to hire help.


http://abcnews.go.com/US/story?id=93364&page=2

In the U.S., 85.8 percent of males and 66.5 percent of females work more than 40 hours per week. According to the ILO, “Americans work 137 more hours per year than Japanese workers, 260 more hours per year than British workers, and 499 more hours per year than French workers.â€￾


http://20somethingfinance.com/american- ... -vacation/

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http://www.vanabode.com/work-kills.htm
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abcdavid01
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Postby abcdavid01 » Wed Feb 27, 2013 9:33 pm

What if, instead of using productivity increases to buy more possessions, we used them to get more time instead?

Productivity has been increasing exponentially for more than a century. This is one of the most remarkable developments of all time. Until a few decades ago, this bounty has been used both for increased material comfort and for more time. However, in recent decades, the increase has been used exclusively to purchase more things; hours have actually increased in the US. Meanwhile, there has been little increase in subjective well-being in developed countries in recent decades.

An average worker needs to work a mere 11 hours per week to produce as much as one working 40 hours per week in 1950. (The data here is from the US, but productivity increases in Europe and Japan have been of the same magnitude.) The conclusion is inescapable: if productivity means anything at all, a worker should be able to earn the same standard of living as a 1950 worker in only 11 hours per week.

...

Polls and surveys have shown that people in countries with the standard of living that the US enjoyed in the 1950's are no less satisfied than today's Americans. Indeed, many studies show that income increases people's subjective well-being only up to the point where basic needs are met.


http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/r ... /worktime/

Something is very wrong...
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