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TOP JOBS of 2013

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TOP JOBS of 2013

Postby TopSpruce » Mon Dec 30, 2013 7:00 pm

So, US News and World came out with its ranking of top jobs in 2013. Some interesting things to note, and some false info on there. http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jo ... -best-jobs

First off, STEM fields are some of the best. No surprise there and generally true.
But some STEM fields are far better than others.

Some of top growth industries of the future are healthcare, oil/minerals, and farming.
(http://www.forbes.com/sites/sageworks/2 ... ng-fields/
http://www.forbes.com/sites/emsi/2013/1 ... ters-most/

However, some jobs are overrated. Such jobs are Physician and computer programmer.


DOCTOR
-------------

Physician is ranked number 5 in US news and world report this year. Sounds good,right?
Well considering it was number one a decade ago, its not a good thing.

Fact is, dentists have surpassed physicians on a salary per hour basis.
This holds up abroad too.

I have met dozens of doctors and dentists in Europe and almost all the doctors told me it was a bad field, while the dentists told me their careers were awesome.

Here is the take of a guy who did both MD and DMD as part of his training as an oral surgeon:

"Dentists do not make as much money as most medical specialists. They also work fewer hours, have more time off, fewer stresses related to life and death issues and are generally happy people. Medical specialists who have lifestyles comparable to dental specialists make roughly (within 20k) the same amount of money, but have more liability (mucking up a molar endo vs. missing a diagnosis of melanoma - both bad days for the practitioner, though one much more likely than the other to have a lawyer at the other end). Having gone to both dental school and medical school, GR can tell you that GR only once heard from a pros faculty that dentistry "wasn't worth it". In medical school, GR heard that medicine "wasn't worth it" at least once a day. You do the math.

Gary "Hobo like Lobo" Ruska

Some other stats:

From 1996 to 2010, average hourly wages for:

Physicians increased from $65.40 to $67.30;
Dentists increased from $64.30 to $69.60;

Pharmacists increased from $37.80 to $50.60;
RNs increased from $26.20 to $29.90;
PAs increased from $21 to $31.20; and
Health care and insurance executives increased from $39.60 to $42.50.

With the high role of government in European medicine, we can see doctors there do not make such high salaries. With increasing government regulation in the USA, the same is bound to happen. Now, the avg. dental salary has surpassed avg. doctor salary.

If you add the fact that stress and working hours are significantly higher for most doctors, dentistry becomes much more appealing.

Now, if you want the power of having someones life in your hands...then being a doctor is still the better career choice. If maximum cash and prestige are you're thing then MD is still the way to go. For lifestyle, dentistry has clearly surpassed medicine.

There are exceptions for certain private practice medical specialists, but barriers to entry are high and you have to be careful in choosing the right one. Work at home radiology sounds like a great opportunity, right? Wrong. Software will soon automate much of the work:

"Pleasingly, the results showed that one radiologist plus CAD is just as effective as two when it comes to spotting potential cancers, proving that the system could be viable for the NHS screening service.

It’s unlikely that CAD will ever completely replace the need for trained radiologists – the system still needs a human eye to distinguish potential tumours. highlighted by the computer’s analysis But by effectively halving the workload for busy doctors, the technology could help to ease the pressure on breast screening services."

Yes, computers won't put radiologists out of business...but they will certainly limit the need for them.

Ford notes that a significant amount of radiology work is now offshored to India and other overseas locations where radiologists earn much less than they do in the United States. “Automation will often come rapidly on the heels of offshoring, especially if the job focuses purely on technical analysis with little need for human interaction,â€￾ he says.


Doctors interacting with real humans are still safe. When in doubt, choose the job that offers more human interaction!




Lets take a look at another ranking below.
Notice that dentistry beats most medical specialties due to less stress, shorter working hours, and less training needed for specialization. If you are looking to travel abroad, dentistry looks even brighter due to less regulation and more private practice options. Dentists study less, pay less for school, work less, and have no major responsibilities.

Here’s our Top 10:

1. Orthodontist. Salaries average $166-204,000. You need two or three years of additional training after dental school, then you'll have good control over working hours and low stress. .

2. General dentist. Salaries average $142-162,000. You have moderate control over your hours and, there’s no additional schooling necessary beyond the four years of dental school.

3. Radiologist. Salaries average about $391,000. You need four additional years of schooling, but you have good control over working hours. This is considered among the least stressful specialties.

4. Dermatologist. Salaries average $297,000. You need four additional years of training, but dermatologists can control their hours and often work a much shorter week. This is considered one of the least stressful specialties, and it’s ranked very high in job satisfaction.

5. Anesthesiologist. Salaries average $220-344,000. You need four additional years of schooling and you’ll probably have to work longer hours, but you’ll have better control. This is considered one of the least stressful specialties. And if you don’t particularly like people, this one’s for you – there’s virtually no patient interaction.

6. Ophthalmologist. Salaries average about $295,000. You need four additional years of training but you’ll have good control over working hours and very little stress. This specialty is ranked high in job satisfaction.

7. Family practice. Along with pediatrics, this specialty is considered least desirable from a financial standpoint and because you have poor control over your hours. Salaries average $174-189,000, but you only need three additional years of schooling, and family practice is ranked very high in job satisfaction.

8. Pediatrics. Salaries average about $189,000. You need three additional years of schooling, and as noted above you won’t have much control over your hours. But peds is ranked very high in job satisfaction.

9. Psychiatrist. Salaries average $167-189,000. You need four additional years of training. You’ll likely have a shorter work week than other specialties and not much stress. This specialty is typically ranked high in job satisfaction.

10. Surgeon. Depending on your exact specialty, salaries average $214-321,000. You need between five and seven years additional training, working hours are uncontrollable and the job is considered very stressful. Nonetheless, it’s ranked high in job satisfaction.

And we’d give Honorable Mention to:

11. OB/GYN. Salaries average $210-268,000. You need four additional years of training, the hours are especially long and uncontrollable, the work is stressful and the liability is high. And yet obstetrics is ranked high in job satisfaction.



12. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Salaries average $166-217,000 but can go much higher. This specialty has the longest schooling requirement since you’re both a dentist and a medical surgeon. You can count on little control over your hours.

--------------------------


COMPUTER PROGRAMMER
-------------------------------------

http://americawhatwentwrong.org/story/p ... jobs-fall/

False growth in programming!

The US Dept of Labor made projections in 1990, saying “employment of programmers is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2005 . . .â€￾

By 2002, the number of programmers had slipped to 499,000. That was down 12 percent–not up–from 1990. ( 1990= 565,000 computer programmer jobs)

By 2006, with the actual number of programming jobs continuing to decline.... falling to 435,000, or 130,000 fewer than in 1990, Labor finally acknowledged that jobs in computer programming were “expected to decline slowly.â€￾


Number of jobs in 2010? 363,100

The outlook on growth is "12% (About as fast as average)"
Given the track record, that prediction is not comforting.

As India/China/Russia, etc. increase in educational capabilities they will crank out dozens of high quality programmers.
Don't think that will happen?
I have met dozens of Russian and Ukrainian computer programmers who have amazing skills. A large number of them are autistic and have miserable lives, but they love their jobs and pour in hour after hour of work on the computer.

Unless you are top 10% in the field of programming and are willing to devote large amounts of time to maintaining fluency in multiple languages and keeping up with cutting edge developments....you're gonna be outsourced.

When looking at work at home jobs, wages are not that great. Considering how much time is needed to keep up do date and current in the field, the hourly salary is nothing special. An enterprising English teacher can making a better wage. An English teacher working abroad in private teaching to companies can make good cash.

Why? Because he is there IN PERSON at the company, teaching English to lawyers, engineers, and programmers.

Programmers can transmit their work over the Internet. Indians working for low wages can get the job done for less...

The best jobs are the ones that can be done in person.

Look at the difference between nurses and medical lab staff. Both require similar levels of education. However, nurses get paid almost double and are in high demand. Medical lab staff are losing jobs as automation takes over workload. Since they are behind the scenes and not in contact with patients, hospitals are willing to pay them less since they aren't visible.

Any job that require person to person contact is safer from automation/outsourcing, and will pay more.







Now some good news:

--------------------

OIL/MINERAL
and ENGINEERING

This field is an excellent growth industry and none of the people I know in the field have trouble with work
Trained blue collar workers such as welders and mechanics are making excellent cash as are the college educated engineers and geologists.

----------

FARMING
Excellent salaries....IF you have the cash to buy enough land to get started.

-----------------------

HEALTHCARE;
non-goverment regulated fields such as personal nurse/aide
Private practice dentists, certain private practice medical specialists are still doing well
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Postby pete98146 » Mon Dec 30, 2013 9:43 pm

I have a client who is an exec for a company that produces semi trucks. He was saying there is a huge shortage of diesel mechanics. Guess it's a two year course at the community college and upon graduation you'll have your choice of jobs. He is claiming the new generation of kids don't like physical labor but for those who do, there is plenty of money to be made....
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Postby C.J. » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:47 pm

f**k! 16 years of expertise, down the drain. LOL :lol:

Guess there's a silver lining. Most people don't wanna burn any muscle, guess I could try that. :P
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Postby MarkDY » Tue Dec 31, 2013 3:17 am

Avoid the American College Educational Complex

"Dirty Jobs' Mike Rowe on the High Cost of College (Full Interview)"

http://reason.com/reasontv/2013/12/13/d ... gh-cost-of
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Postby xiongmao » Tue Dec 31, 2013 10:02 am

I'll stick with IT, although it's not an easy field to get started in either.

But the good thing is that if you can crack it in IT, you're easily smart enough to move careers. I used to work with a genius guy and he went off to make another fortune in mining.
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Postby TopSpruce » Tue Dec 31, 2013 3:01 pm

Yeah, if you're already in the field you might as well stay. But for those looking to start or switch careers its not the best choice.
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Postby zboy1 » Tue Dec 31, 2013 4:54 pm

MarkDY wrote:Avoid the American College Educational Complex

"Dirty Jobs' Mike Rowe on the High Cost of College (Full Interview)"

http://reason.com/reasontv/2013/12/13/d ... gh-cost-of


Wow! Great interview by Reason and Mike Rowe. He's right that blue-collar jobs are being 'shunned' in favor of supposedly, 'higher status' jobs, when many blue collar jobs are in great demand--and there's a shortage of workers in certain highly skilled trades, like truck drivers, machinists, and welders.

But society looks 'down' on those kinds of jobs as being dirty and physical.

I really believe the U.S. should adopt some of Germany's labor practices and apprenticeship programs, which would be very good for Americans that don't want to go to college or academia.
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Postby E Irizarry R&B Singer » Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:32 am

Oh really?

Well I'm in SharePoint, and I'm working on expanding to MS Dynamics AX and/or CRM so I'm marketable like whoa.

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Postby E Irizarry R&B Singer » Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:43 am

zboy1 wrote:
MarkDY wrote:Avoid the American College Educational Complex

"Dirty Jobs' Mike Rowe on the High Cost of College (Full Interview)"

http://reason.com/reasontv/2013/12/13/d ... gh-cost-of


Wow! Great interview by Reason and Mike Rowe. He's right that blue-collar jobs are being 'shunned' in favor of supposedly, 'higher status' jobs, when many blue collar jobs are in great demand--and there's a shortage of workers in certain highly skilled trades, like truck drivers, machinists, and welders.

But society looks 'down' on those kinds of jobs as being dirty and physical.

I really believe the U.S. should adopt some of Germany's labor practices and apprenticeship programs, which would be very good for Americans that don't want to go to college or academia.


I had a Black American acquaintance whom worked in Germany about 15 years ago, and they couldn't care less that he was Black American and dark. All his employer cared about was can he get to work on-time and without being too far off of ultimatum getting the work successfully completed. He worked as a Cisco systems Engineer or something like that; he was Cisco-certified.
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