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Wow! Denmark the perfect country!!!

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Wow! Denmark the perfect country!!!

Postby steve55 » Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:13 am

I've noticed that in the USA, higher taxes is a very dirty word, but many counties in Europe with much higher tax rates consistently score highest in the world in life satisfaction and happiness surveys. This article describes the way I wish the US was. Two core statements in this article are reflective of the society I'd like to live in and identity with and align with my core values, especially #1 below!!

1) "Among Danes, though, distaste for ostentatious wealth tends to outweigh dissatisfaction with taxes."

2) "Elite is a dirty word here," Mellish said. "The whole idea of ambition is embarrassing in Denmark. It's like being gay in the 1960's: Everybody knows it exists, but no one talks about it."

Anyways, this article describes utopia for me. No one is taking more resources than they need from society , income is more redistributed.(reflective of a society that cares for the less well off) Materialism, greed, the rich stomping the poor is much more controlled. While capitalism and profit motivation have their benefits, yes profit motive is essential in any economy, Denmark strikes a very healthy balance between capitalism and socialism in my opinion. It's why they and countries that have less income inequality (or more wealth redistribution via higher tax rates on everyone and/or higher tax rates on the rich) score the highest on happiness surveys. I've noticed a trend in world happiness and contentment surveys, (a general trend, not an absolute trend)and this article seems to explain it very well. Income inequality in societies seems to destroys happiness and contentment.



Source- http://finance.yahoo.com/news/wealth-ga ... 48309.html

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — This is what it's like to live in Denmark, a nation with a narrower wealth gap than almost anywhere else: You've been jobless for more than a year. You have no university degree, no advanced skills. You have to pay a mortgage. And your husband is nearing retirement.

You aren't worried.

If you're 51-year-old Lotte Geleff, who lost her job as an office clerk in January 2013, you know you'll receive an unemployment benefit of 10,500 kroner ($1,902) a month after taxes for up to two years. You're part of a national system of free health care and education for everyone, jobtraining, subsidized child care, a generous pension system and fuel subsidies and rent allowances for the elderly.

And high taxes.

Denmark's sturdy social safety net helps explain why its wealth gap — the disparity between the richest citizens and everyone else — is second-smallest among the world's 34 most developed economies, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, surpassed only by the much smaller economy of Slovenia.

Behind its slender wealth gap are factors ranging from the highest tax burden in the European Union to a system that helps laid-off workers find new jobs and re-training.

They are factors that depend on a level of government involvement — financial and otherwise — that would be politically unacceptable in some areas of the world.

Cause and effect would be impossible to prove, but Danes appear more content than people in most other industrialized nations. Eighty-nine percent of Danes reported having more positive experiences in an average day than negative ones, according to the OECD — the highest figure among the organization's 34 countries.

"We don't have steaks on the table every night, but we're OK," says Geleff, who has a house near the city of Roskilde.

While the gap between the wealthy and everyone else is widening in much of the industrialized world, a large chunk of Danes remain firmly middle class. Forty-two percent of the working population of 4.6 million have annual disposable incomes between 200,000 and 400,000 kroner ($36,700-$73,300). Just 2.6 percent earn more than 500,000 kroner a year ($91,383).

According to the OECD, the top 20 percent of Danes earn on average four times as much as the bottom 20 percent. In the United States, by contrast, the top 20 percent earn about eight times as much as the bottom 20 percent.

The idea of a generous government-provided cushion for ordinary people is deeply rooted in a nation with few outward signs of a pampered elite. Members of the royal family often bike to drop off their children at a public daycare center. Last winter, Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt was seen shoveling snow outside her home in Copenhagen.


FILE - This is a June 2011 file photo of people wait outside a Jobcenter in Copenhagen. Denmark' …
With a solid safety net in place, the government has persuaded unions to accept a flexible labor market. Under a model known as "Flexicurity," companies can quickly lay off staffers during downturns. Laid-off workers, in turn, receive training and guidance in pursuing new careers.

Such training is part of Denmark's approach to education, which is free for everyone of all ages in this country of 5.6 million. Students of any age over 18 who live on their own can receive a stipend of 5,839 kroner ($1,028) a month. Those living with their parents can receive about half that.

So widespread is education that one byproduct has been something unfamiliar elsewhere: A shortage of unskilled labor. Denmark has no mandated minimum wage. But unions and employers' organizations have agreed on a minimum of 111 kroner ($20.30) an hour.

Torben Andersen, an economics professor at Aarhus University, sees political unity as a factor in Denmark's narrow wealth gap.

"There are not the same strong conflicts and very strong parties and views like you will see, for instance, in U.S. politics," he said.

Some issues do tend to fan tensions in Denmark. One is immigration. With net immigration of about 2.25 people per 1,000 citizens, Denmark welcomes nearly as many as the United States. Many come from war-torn Middle East countries with few qualifications. Some of them struggle to find jobs, leaving some Danes to complain about immigrants benefiting from the welfare system without contributing to it.

Such anxieties have lent support to the anti-immigration Danish People's Party. Its influence has led to a tightening of immigration laws. It's become harder for foreigners to obtain residence permits and for refugees in Denmark to bring relatives into the country.

Despite the heavy tax burden, public support for the social security system remains high. In a Gallup poll published this month, 38 percent of people who were asked whether they were happy to pay their taxes said they "fully" agreed. Fifty percent "partly" agreed. A poll last year showed that 66 percent opposed cuts to the welfare system.

Kay Xander Mellish, a Wisconsin native who's lived in Denmark for 13 years, says one reason Denmark's system enjoys public support is that pretty much everyone, regardless of income, shares in its benefits.

"If you are a high earner in the U.S., you can pay a lot for social services that you will never use, and I can see why that upsets people," says Mellish, who's enjoyed a year's paid maternity leave and subsidized daycare. "At least when I pay for social services, I can see what I get back."

In Copenhagen, teacher Per Broenholt ticked off the government benefits he values. A father of two, he has six weeks' vacation a year, which he uses to visit a summer home or foreign destinations such as Thailand or Turkey. He cycles to work and uses the family car mainly to drive to the grocery store on weekends.

Still, he acknowledges, taxes are a burden. Income tax rates in Denmark range from 30 percent to 51.5 percent. There's little incentive to work toward a promotion, Broenholt says, because "the taxman would take half" the additional money earned. And gas is expensive, at around 12 kroner ($2.18) for a liter (0.3 gallon), a result of environmental taxes.


FILE - This is a January 2012 file photo of a homeless man sleeping in Townhall Square in Copenhagen …
Advocates of low taxes, in the United States and elsewhere, have long argued that high taxes act as a drag on economies, stifling investment, hiring and spending. As with many countries with high taxes, Denmark's long-term growth has trailed the pace of expansion in the United States and some other major economies.

Among Danes, though, distaste for ostentatious wealth tends to outweigh dissatisfaction with taxes.

"Elite is a dirty word here," Mellish said. "The whole idea of ambition is embarrassing in Denmark. It's like being gay in the 1960's: Everybody knows it exists, but no one talks about it."

Wealthy Danes make up a lower proportion than in many other countries. About 0.3 percent of Danes earn more than $370,000 a year. In the United States, a full 1 percent had income over $394,000 in 2012, according to Internal Revenue Service data.

As the cost of their social welfare systems has grown, Denmark and other Nordic nations have embraced work incentives — a trend that's led to a slight widening in income disparities. Sweden has gradually cut income taxes for the employed by up to $330 a month. Denmark has pushed to lower the maximum period for full unemployment benefits from four years to two.

Prime Minister Thorning-Schmidt said she's committed to helping businesses stay competitive.

"We need to continue to take decisions to ensure that our model is sustainable and preserves prosperity," she said in an email to The Associated Press.

In the end, there's an economic trade-off, says Danske Bank's chief economist, Steen Bocian.

"You could probably have higher growth in Denmark, allowing for more income inequality," he said. "But it's a political question whether you would pursue that.",
Last edited by steve55 on Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:53 am, edited 7 times in total.
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Postby steve55 » Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:46 am

LET ME INTRODUCE THIS ARTICLE TOO SINCE IT RELATES TO THE ABOVE ARTICLE ON WHY DENMARK AND OTHER EURO COUNTRIES GOT IT RIGHT AND THE U.S. HASNT. IT ALSO EXPLAINS WHY POORER 3rd WORLD COUNTRIES ARE OUT RANKING THE US IN HAPPINESS SURVEYS- THESE OTHER COUNTRIES ARE LESS MATERIAILISTIC AND MORE CONNECTED. THEIR SOCIETIES AARE BASED ON COOPERATION , ...NOT COMPETITION LIKE THE U.S.






Source http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/Tom-Shad ... obile-Home

Several years ago, Tom Shadyac seemed to have it all: a multimillion-dollar career directing Hollywood blockbusters like Bruce Almighty and The Nutty Professor, a 17,000-square-foot mansion, fancy cars, the luxury of flying in private jets, invitations to extravagant parties and more. It was a life many people dream about.

Despite these many luxuries, Tom says something just didn't feel right.

"I was standing in the house that my culture had taught me was a measure of the good life," Tom recalls in his documentary I Am. "I was struck with one very clear, very strange feeling: I was no happier."

Tom says he had been feeling a sense of emptiness for quite a while when a traumatic bike accident in 2007 left him with excruciating post-concussion syndrome. After several months of what he describes as "torture," Tom began to welcome death.

"Facing my own death brought an instant sense of clarity and purpose," he says in his film. "If I was, indeed, going to die, I asked myself: What did I want to say before I went? It became very simple and very clear. I wanted to tell people what I had come to know. And what I had come to know was that the world I was living in was a lie."

Five months after his accident, Tom began filming I Am to get to the bottom of two burning questions: What's wrong with our world, and what can we do about it?


Tom says that part of what's wrong with our world—and the lie that he says he was living—is our culture's definition of success.

"[We have] a very extrinsic model of success," he explains. "You have to have a certain job status, a certain amount of wealth. ... I think true success is intrinsic. ... It's love. It's kindness. It's community."

As Tom journeyed on his quest to find out what would truly make him happy and help unearth what's wrong with our world, he made major changes to his lifestyle. Today, Tom lives in a modest mobile home, bikes to work and flies commercial airlines—and he says he's never been happier.

"I started to wake up to certain hypocrisies in my life about 10 or 12 years ago, and I started shifting things as I asked [myself] more and more questions," Tom says. "The bike accident is what compelled me to share my journey."

Tom's journey can be seen in his provocative documentary I Am as he asks important questions about life, human nature, human behavior and our culture to dig down deeper and understand why the world is the way it is.

To find out why the world is the way it is, Tom explored the readings of scientists, philosophers, poets and others, and spoke with thought leaders, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, scientist Dean Radin, researcher Rollin McCraty of the HeartMath Institute, journalist Lynn McTaggart, professor Dacher Keltner of U.C. Berkeley, author Thom Hartmon and more.

What he discovered revolves around three key concepts that are explored in I Am:
1. It is scientifically proven that the entire human race is connected.
2. It is human nature to be cooperative rather than competitive.
3. If you don't do what your heart wants you to do and follow your passion, it will destroy you.

In I Am, Tom says, "There's one fundamental law that all of nature obeys that mankind breaks every day. Now, this is a law that's evolved over billions of years, and the law is this: Nothing in nature takes more than it needs."

In our culture, however, humans often take more than they need by buying large homes, driving expensive cars and living excessively, as Tom says he did.

"We have a term for something in the body when it takes more than its share," Tom says in the documentary. "We call it cancer."
Tom says he didn't want to be a part of that cancer—he wanted to be a part of the healing. "We must lose this cancerous idea that we have to take everything we can," he says.

"But [you're] not saying we have to give up all the stuff," Oprah says, turning to the audience. "He's saying that you look inside yourself and ask the questions of yourself."

"I can judge no one. And my path is different than someone else's," Tom says. "It's a simple life. I haven't given up everything. I don't want to overdramatize this. I simply met myself at my needs."


In a culture that takes more than it needs and gets caught up in the quest for wealth and power, Oprah says that one of the ways we've gotten so off course is the obsession with celebrity.

Tom: Celebrity should be celebrated. We should celebrate you and others for your talent. For your gift. ... [However,] when we put people on a pedestal, [we get] in the way of our authentic selves.

Oprah: But look at what we did as a culture. First, there was celebrating people because they did something or had an achievement. And now, this culture celebrates people for doing absolutely nothing.

Tom: Yes. ... The irony is we call it "reality TV." It's anything but reality.

Oprah: But aren't we a part of it?

Tom: Oh, my gosh, yes.

Oprah: Aren't we the feeder system? Everybody who's watching it? We're the feeder system. You can see how it reflects us, and we reflect it.

Tom: The audience—you guys have all the power. You see, you have to stop elevating us. I don't want to be your hero. I want to be your brother. You know, I want to be your family member. I want to be your equal. And if you start seeing things as they are, like as the divine sees it...who will celebrate the women who swept this floor as much as any artist because she is an artist too. We're all artists. If you guys start doing that, it will change.

A big revelation in I Am is that our culture is wrongly built around the idea of competition. Tom says in the film, "That's pretty much the message that I got as a kid: 'Separate yourself from the pack.' 'Be number one.' And 'Win.'"

Though our culture may be built around competition, I Am strives to answer the question of whether it's competition or cooperation that is the essential nature of humans.

"If you talk to people in aboriginal or indigenous cultures, you find the highest societal values is cooperation. And competition is a very low value. And competition beyond certain boundaries is considered mental illness," says author Thom Hartmann in I Am. "You look at our culture, and cooperation is considered a relatively low value. And competition is considered the highest value. We celebrate the most powerful competitors."

But is competition the true essence of human nature? Thom says that scientists decided to test this hypothesis and found that it is not.

"What [scientists] found was that democracy was being played out literally every day by ... animals," Thom says. He recalls his own experiences of going scuba diving and seeing schools of fish dart around as a collective group, and also remembers watching flocks of birds in his backyard fly together and change directions suddenly while still remaining together.

"How did they know?" Thom asks. "Well, it turns out, when you do the slow-motion photography, they're all voting literally with every wing beat or with every gill beat. They're voting hundreds of times a minute. And [the scientists] said, 'We found this from insects all the way up to primates.' The basis of nature is cooperation and democracy. It's in our DNA."

For the past 25 years, The Oprah Show has been telling people stories in hopes of connecting us all—sometimes people have laughed, and other times people have broken into what Oprah calls "the ugly cry." Now, Tom tells us that there is real science behind all of our responses.

That science is rooted in something called the vagus nerve, a bundle of nerves that triggers strong emotions within our bodies. "If we show people images in the lab that are classic sources of wanting to connect, the vagus nerve fires," explains professor Dacher Keltner in I Am. "It's when your chest kind of expands and you tear up. And you get this big rush."

"I understood that when they did the testing of the vagus nerve that they used a lot of Oprah Show clips for that," Oprah says to Tom.

"Well, the truth is that you have been the greatest igniter of the vagus nerve in the past 25 years!" Tom says. "By showing other human beings' stories that we all respond to, [Oprah] is helping evolution."

Another one of the important concepts in I Am is one that Oprah has said for years: If you don't do what your heart wants you to do and follow your passion, it will destroy you.

"People find happiness in direct proportion to doing what they love," she says. "If you don't do what you love, you die a little every day."

For this reason, Tom says he will not stop making comedies—he will always follow his heart. "I love comedy," he says. "I would happily serve that again. But I also have to do what's in my heart, which is ... I feel like I need to carry on this conversation."

Following one's heart may require him or her to make changes in life, and the way people change, Tom says, is to ask questions. The main question he wants people to ask themselves is this: Who are you? Not what your culture has told you to be, but who are you on the inside?

"I think many of us are living inauthentic lives," he says. "Authenticity means to be the author of your own life. I think many of us are telling stories that have been given to us rather than our own story."
Last edited by steve55 on Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:55 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby zboy1 » Wed Jun 25, 2014 6:53 am

I don't know why more people living in the U.S. or abroad don't consider relocating to European countries...?

For those not into Asian women, and also those who prefer living in a more Western country, Europe is a good choice for some people, especially those that want to live in a more socialized country with good benefits and a strong welfare system.

Third World countries aren't the only possible destination to think of, when being "happier-abroad."
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Postby gsjackson » Wed Jun 25, 2014 11:47 am

I've met four Danes in my life. Each one was an extremely impressive person. And each was very much focused on this ideal of economic egalitarianism contributing to a healthy society. A couple of them came to visit me in New Orleans several years ago, and wanted to go on the poverty tour to get the full flavor of what they called "the United States of Inequality." They got their money's worth. The windows were being rolled up as we drove past the projects where Master P grew up.

I'm afraid I'm going to have to spend time in Scandanavia, outrageously expensive though it may be. Difficulties communicating in English are proving significant in eastern Europe (though not in the Balkans). I'm currently in Prague.
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Postby djfourmoney » Wed Jun 25, 2014 8:42 pm

Just wait until the Libertarians come to this thread. They will say the high taxes and other Government restrictions limit entrepreneur-ism.

Work as we know it will be obsolete sooner than most people think.

The Governments are going to have to step-in and pay people to participate in the economy.

Why aren't more Americans living in Scandinavia? Zboy do you limit your exposure to Americans or something?

How many times have you heard "USA, USA, USA"? Do you think it's harmless patriotism?

What do you think Lars Larson, Micheal Savage, Rush Limbaugh and others do with most of the time on their radio shows?

The demonize Liberals, Liberalism and Socialism.

Just look at this forum, that will explain to you why most 'Mericans will stay put and why they rather talk about racial inferiority, Government interference and the specter of Multiculturalism.

Also how many times have you heard Denmark, Sweden, Norway or Finland are Feminist hell holes allowing in Jihadist, militant Arabs into their countries???
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Postby Moretorque » Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:08 pm

If I am not mistaken Denmark is where the house of Orange resides which is Queen Beatrix who's cousin Queen Elizabeth is just a heartbeat away across the channel?

Duped and then programmed by the state.
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Re: Wow! Denmark the perfect country!!!

Postby eurobrat » Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:12 pm

steve55 wrote:I've noticed that in the USA, higher taxes is a very dirty word, but many counties in Europe with much higher tax rates consistently score highest in the world in life satisfaction and happiness surveys. This article describes the way I wish the US was. Two core statements in this article are reflective of the society I'd like to live in and identity with and align with my core values, especially #1 below!!

1) "Among Danes, though, distaste for ostentatious wealth tends to outweigh dissatisfaction with taxes."

2) "Elite is a dirty word here," Mellish said. "The whole idea of ambition is embarrassing in Denmark. It's like being gay in the 1960's: Everybody knows it exists, but no one talks about it."

Anyways, this article describes utopia for me. No one is taking more resources than they need from society , income is more redistributed.(reflective of a society that cares for the less well off) Materialism, greed, the rich stomping the poor is much more controlled. While capitalism and profit motivation have their benefits, yes profit motive is essential in any economy, Denmark strikes a very healthy balance between capitalism and socialism in my opinion. It's why they and countries that have less income inequality (or more wealth redistribution via higher tax rates on everyone and/or higher tax rates on the rich) score the highest on happiness surveys. I've noticed a trend in world happiness and contentment surveys, (a general trend, not an absolute trend)and this article seems to explain it very well. Income inequality in societies seems to destroys happiness and contentment.


Those countries are not as nice as they look on paper. Heavy socialism is not the solution to happiness and a fulfilling life.
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Postby djfourmoney » Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:37 pm

Moretorque wrote:If I am not mistaken Denmark is where the house of Orange resides which is Queen Beatrix who's cousin Queen Elizabeth is just a heartbeat away across the channel?

Duped and then programmed by the state.


Is this more Bilderberg, connecting the dots, nonsense?

Does it really matter that Monarchies are linked?

The topic was the welfare state in Denmark and by extension how the Scandinavian countries have avoided the financial crisis with a robust welfare state.

Fear Mongering of the "Global Elite" is a distraction and yet another reason why a Men's Rights Movement will never come of age. There are too many silos, not enough cohesion and small numbers.
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Re: Wow! Denmark the perfect country!!!

Postby djfourmoney » Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:53 pm

eurobrat wrote:
steve55 wrote:I've noticed that in the USA, higher taxes is a very dirty word, but many counties in Europe with much higher tax rates consistently score highest in the world in life satisfaction and happiness surveys. This article describes the way I wish the US was. Two core statements in this article are reflective of the society I'd like to live in and identity with and align with my core values, especially #1 below!!

1) "Among Danes, though, distaste for ostentatious wealth tends to outweigh dissatisfaction with taxes."

2) "Elite is a dirty word here," Mellish said. "The whole idea of ambition is embarrassing in Denmark. It's like being gay in the 1960's: Everybody knows it exists, but no one talks about it."

Anyways, this article describes utopia for me. No one is taking more resources than they need from society , income is more redistributed.(reflective of a society that cares for the less well off) Materialism, greed, the rich stomping the poor is much more controlled. While capitalism and profit motivation have their benefits, yes profit motive is essential in any economy, Denmark strikes a very healthy balance between capitalism and socialism in my opinion. It's why they and countries that have less income inequality (or more wealth redistribution via higher tax rates on everyone and/or higher tax rates on the rich) score the highest on happiness surveys. I've noticed a trend in world happiness and contentment surveys, (a general trend, not an absolute trend)and this article seems to explain it very well. Income inequality in societies seems to destroys happiness and contentment.


Those countries are not as nice as they look on paper. Heavy socialism is not the solution to happiness and a fulfilling life.


Correct, moderation is the key, but given the groans are muted in Scandinavia because all the complaining is not focused. They will talk about how socialism has overreached, but get them talking long enough and they'll be complaints about Arabs and Multiculturalism which will invalidate their whole argument about the overreach.

Not too long ago, a Swedish Parliamentarian quipped in reaction to riots in Stockholm by Arab teenagers; saying "We give them clean housing, welfare, educate their children, why are they rioting?"

I can get into an extended diatribe about how Whites love to talk about Blacks on welfare when its not even something to be proud of not because it's handout, but because it's a min handout and won't get you out of poverty; not to mention it hasn't been increased or expanded but cut back constantly since Clinton and not kept up with inflation.

The problem with Arabs in Europe as a whole is social integration, but won't go into why that is. Let's just say if they accepted Christians from Iraq, Syria and other war zones, it would be less of a problem.

Like I said the overreach by the Social-Democracies in those countries can put a damper on things. The truth is however, its the rich and the wann-be rich who are doing the most complaining.

Everybody else is content and that's why serious changes are NOT forthcoming.
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Postby Cornfed » Wed Jun 25, 2014 10:52 pm

The difference between taxation in countries like Denmark and shitholes like the Anglosphere is that in Denmark the average man actually gets something in return for his taxes, whereas in the Anglosphere it is more a case of white men being robbed to pay for the dysfunctional lifestyles of females and inferior races. This is presumably why all the Danes I have met have complained about immigration. An all for one and one for all philosophy only works in a homogenous society where people are trustworthy and are not inclined to abuse the system. Open your borders and you should expect a lot of dysgenics with outstretched paws.
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Postby SilverEnergy » Thu Jun 26, 2014 2:34 am

Of course, it's common knowledge that European countries, Canada and Australia rank higher than the United States in terms of quality of life but some of the places are also a little more expensive to live.
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Postby djfourmoney » Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:55 am

SilverEnergy wrote:Of course, it's common knowledge that European countries, Canada and Australia rank higher than the United States in terms of quality of life but some of the places are also a little more expensive to live.


Nice to see the Village Idiot chiming in with is usual inferior races rant. Just can't keep that out of his mouth for more than a minute, no wonder he's a lower middle class person.

The latest Mercer survey results are in, it's not much different than '13 or '12

Highest standards of living is still three out of the top five cities are in Switzerland. Copenhagen is I think 9th now but still the first ranked Scandinavian city.

The first US city is I think Honolulu, Hawaii. The quality of life might be good there, but it's almost very expensive.

Being a car guy, Demark is a bit of turnoff because they tax you heavily to have one. In the long term for the environment and the specter of peak energy, however this likely the right move, though it would drive US conservatives nuts.

One of the many reasons why for me all road lead to Latin America is the fact I can develop my business and reduce the cost of living. Ultimately I would like to have my children educated in Europe; that is if International schools in LA aren't overtly expensive.
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Postby droid » Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:02 am

But why should I give my hard-earned money to someone inferior, of the same race or otherwise?
Usually the 're-distributionist' spirit lasts someone until they start making some decent money themselves.

I agree with the 'moderation' call.
1)Too much of one thing defeats the purpose.
2)Everybody is full of it. What's your hypocrisy?
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Postby Jester » Thu Jun 26, 2014 5:31 am

Cornfed wrote:The difference between taxation in countries like Denmark and shitholes like the Anglosphere is that in Denmark the average man actually gets something in return for his taxes, whereas in the Anglosphere it is more a case of white men being robbed to pay for the dysfunctional lifestyles of females and inferior races. This is presumably why all the Danes I have met have complained about immigration. An all for one and one for all philosophy only works in a homogenous society where people are trustworthy and are not inclined to abuse the system. Open your borders and you should expect a lot of dysgenics with outstretched paws.


+1

You have to adjust high European tax downward by the value you get back.

In the US you get nothing that you want from the Federal government (unless you enjoy groveling). They are simply a nuisance.
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Re: Wow! Denmark the perfect country!!!

Postby Jester » Thu Jun 26, 2014 5:34 am

eurobrat wrote:
Those countries are not as nice as they look on paper. Heavy socialism is not the solution to happiness and a fulfilling life.


Eurobrat you're in Prague still?

What's your perspective?

Is Europe happier?

Would Denmark, or Nordic Austria, for example, next door to you, have any advantage over Eastern Europe?

What's your feeling about your European experiment?
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Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

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