Join John Adams, world renowned Intl Matchmaker, Thurs nights 8:30 EST for Live Webcasts with FREE Prizes!
And check out Five Reasons why you should attend a FREE Live AFA Seminar! See locations and details.


Scam free! Check out Christian Filipina - Meet Asian women with Christian values! Members screened.
Exclusive book offer! 75% off! How to Meet, Date and Marry Your Filipina Wife



View Active Topics       Latest 100 Topics       View Your Posts       FAQ Topics       Switch to Mobile


The Savage Life

Discuss and talk about any general topic.

Moderators: jamesbond, fschmidt

The Savage Life

Postby The_Adventurer » Sun Apr 03, 2016 10:45 am

In another thread, Adama posted some information from Benjamin Franklin which I believe is worthy of discussion apart from the idiocy of the thread in which it appears. In the thread, he quotes Benjamin Franklin as follows:

Benjamin Franklin wrote:To those who remained behind, it was often rumored that those who had gone over to the Indians had been “captured.” While some captives were taken, more often the whites took up Indian life without compulsion. As Franklin wrote to Peter Collinson May 9, 1753:

The proneness of human Nature to a life of ease, of freedom from care and labour appear strongly in the heretofore little success that has attended every attempt to civilize our American Indians. . . . They visit us frequently and see the advantages that Arts, Science and compact Society procure us; they are not deficient in natural understanding and yet they have never strewn any inclination to change their manner of life for ours, or to learn any of our Arts.
While Indians did not seem to have much inclination to exchange their culture for the Euro-American, many Euro-Americans appeared more than willing to become Indians at this time:

When an Indian child has been brought up among us, taught our language and habituated to our customs, yet if he goes to see his relations and makes one Indian Ramble with them, there is no perswading him ever to return. And that this is not natural [only to Indians], but as men, is plain from this, that when white persons of either sex have been taken prisoners young by the Indians, and lived awhile among them, tho’ ransomed by their Friends, and treated with all imaginable tenderness to prevail with them to stay among the English, yet within a Short time they become disgusted with our manner of Life, and the care and pains that are necessary to support it, and take the first good Opportunity of escaping again into the Woods, from whence there is no reclaiming them.
Franklin followed with an example. He had heard of a person who had been “reclaimed” from the Indians and returned to a sizable estate. Tired of the care needed to maintain such a style of life, he had turned it over to his younger brother and, taking only a rifle and a matchcoat, “took his way again to the Wilderness.” Franklin used this story to illustrate his point that “No European who has tasted Savage Life can afterwards bear to live in our societies. Such societies provided their members with greater opportunities for happiness than European cultures.

The Care and Labour of providing for Artificial and fashionable Wants, the sight of so many Rich wallowing in superfluous plenty, whereby so many are kept poor and distress’d for Want, the Insolence of Office . . . the restraints of Custom, all contrive to disgust them with what we call civil Society.


I have read numerous articles on this very topic. I have even seen documentary films relating to this particular issue in our modern times. In these documentary films, they usually involve modern western man going to live among the natives of the rain forest in south America. In one such film, the story is told of the native boy who was raised since being an infant in the big city. I believe it was the capital of Venezuela. Growing up, this boy never fit in and often got into trouble. He also developed a serious drinking problem.

As an adult, this boy discovered he had living relatives among the natives of the rainforest. He eventually went to live among. Living among the natives, he found that everyday he did absolutely nothing. He was amazed that the elders didn't pressure them to do any sort of work. They simply told him that one day you will find yourself. He tried a number of different things, But nothing seemed to stick. Eventually, he turned to gardening. After some time, yet found what he wanted to do and it created a beautiful garden and was contributing to feeding his people and growing medicinal plants. The elders told him that they always knew he would find his way. He was also free from his drinking problem and his troublemaking ways.

In another story, we hear about the western man who married a local native woman and took her back to England. At first, she was astounded by all the tall buildings in the supermarket stocked with more food than any number of people could eat. She was impressed with all the advanced technology modern society had to offer. After some time, however, even though they had children, she became disillusioned. She said that in that society everyone locked themselves in a box. Each person, or family, stayed in their little box alone and didn't interact with others. She couldn't stand this.

You see, in her village houses had roofs but no walls. Everything was built in a circle, and everyone could see everyone else at anytime. The very idea of privacy was completely foreign to her. Life in the modern western world was too fast-paced and lonely for her. Eventually, she took her children and return home to her native rainforest.

Anyone who knows the story of Mutiny on the Bounty, which involves the Cook Islands, can quickly see that it also relates to this issue. The men on that ship took local wives from among the Islanders and wanted to stay there. Life there provided much more happiness than finishing out their contracts working for the English.

I have a friend, who is a minister, went to the Cook Islands to do missionary work. He once told me the story of how he stood on a hill with a native looking down on the posh resort where the Americans were staying. The native asked him,"This is what makes you happy?" Looking down at this resort, with all of its amenities, the native simply couldn't understand it.

My friend also told me that the owners of these posh resorts always had trouble staffing them. The natives would work for a week or two and then suddenly disappear. The reason for this, my friend was told, was that on those islands the natives lacked nothing. Fruit trees were growing everywhere, and any child new how to go down to the nearest waterhole and catch fish and crab with a stick. When someone needed a house, their friends got together and they put up a hook for them. The materials needed to build it are everywhere. The only reason someone would work, is because they wanted a DVD player or video game or something like that. It would work just long enough to save up the money needed to buy the thing they want and then quit.

This type of thing was a huge problem for the British Empire during their maritime journeys. They would arrive on the island where the natives lived in perfect tropical weather. Food was friendly growing everywhere and fishing game were plentiful. The natives basically had no reason to do work for The English. They were not poor. The English would, then, mow down their trees and put a fence around their watering holes, saying that now they have to pay for that which had been free all of their lives. In this way, they forced the natives to work on their plantations. This type of thing is still happening in South America today. Now, however, it is large companies like Coke and Pepsi instead of the British Empire.

THE HAPPIER ABROAD CONNECTION

I've often wondered if this issue plays a part in why the Philippines is a great destination for those who wish to be happier abroad. Before civilization came to them, the people of the Philippines where Island natives living a lifestyle not much different than that of Native Americans. In fact, some tribes still live that way in the mountains to this day. The people are very welcoming, open and friendly. Poverty is not experienced in the same way as it will be in the west.

I have seen people living in the worst of squatter areas and yet make no effort to improve their lives. I once ventured into such area not far from Ayala Mall in Cebu city. In that area, I spoke with the number of able-bodied men, In the middle of the day, who were drinking rum and playing cards. These men were all perfectly capable of working if they have the inclination.

Like the native villages I described in the rain forest of South America, the houses in this area have no real walls. They might put up the sheet, Or some form of paneling, but for the most part things were pretty open. Small children were running around playing, Women or washing clothes or cooking, and the men were drinking, playing cards, and enjoying themselves. Just was their life. Perhaps, they saw no reason to try and change.

So my favorite such an area that is incredibly dangerous. To some extent, it probably is. Everyone there, however, was very friendly and they invited me to sit down, Drink and play cards with them.

WORK AND LIFE

I will freely admit that I don't like to work. Don't get me wrong, as an artist and animator I can do my craft for 12 hours a day and enjoy every minute of it. I made huge salaries doing this type of thing for companies such as EA, Warner Bros., Sony pictures and universal. It's not work to me. Still, for some reason I wanted to escape and find some form of freedom. As Benjamin Franklin spoke, the care of maintaining a certain life style was just too much trouble. That's one of the reasons I first went to the Philippines.

In the Philippines, doing my craft for myself, as opposed to using it to make someone else rich, I sometimes made only $300 or $400 per month. Still, I could survive there! I have my freedom. I would wake up and every hour of every day was mine to do with as I please. I did lots of different things to make money. Some of them I liked, and some of them I didn't. At least, I had choices. Living in Los Angeles, with a $1200 a month rent bearing down on me, and a huge car payment, and many other things I had no such choices.

I'm currently in China. There have been many discussions on here about the importance of the pursuit of money in this country, and I feel that, as a result, I got stuck in a grind not much different then what I escaped from in Los Angeles. I suppose this is why this particular topic currently appeals to me. I'm starting to think that, for those who can handle some of the Philippines more negative points, it may still be one of the best destinations for those who wish to be happier abroad, especially those who wish to escape the rat race and find some form of freedom in life.
Last edited by The_Adventurer on Mon Apr 04, 2016 4:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
“b***y is so strong that there are dudes willing to blow themselves up for the highly unlikely possibility of b***y in another dimension." -- Joe Rogan
User avatar
The_Adventurer
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:17 pm







Re: The Savage Life

Postby Wolfeye » Sun Apr 03, 2016 12:42 pm

The Adventurer: Got some interest in the Philippines, could you go into more detail? They don't generally speak Spanish, right? And there's some nuances to living there (for a white man, especially), I hear. Besides little things here & there (mostly Kali-related), I don't know much about the Philippines.
Wolfeye
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1130
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 6:18 am

Re: The Savage Life

Postby hammanta » Sun Apr 03, 2016 2:14 pm

This is a very interesting thread. Thanks for sharing.

I recall traveling with a few friends to a place in Zambales called Anawagin Cove. It is an isolated cove, only way in and out is by boat but is a tourist attraction place. There's no electricity and only semi running water. Showers are taken by filling up a bucket of cold water and dumping it on yourself. Same bucket is used for flushing the toilet. We planned on staying for 4 days but within the first few hours I wanted to leave. There was literally nothing to do except lay in your tent or walk the beach. By the 4th day I had become depressed because I was leaving.

Something about the tranquility in doing nothing, having no plans, just waking up to endless possibilities and no stress on a beautiful beach with good friends, was pure bliss. Sure 4 days wasn't a lifetime but I am the type of person who goes insane being home for a few hours. I need to always be working on something, having something planned to do, looking to the future to escape my "miserable" present. In the modern world we tend to rely on hope to get us by: hoping that working 14 hour days will pay off later, hoping that new car will boost my social standing, hoping that in ten years once my career takes off I will be able to do the things and get the things I want. There is no living in the present. I personally have a great family, have a strong group of friends, decent finances, and can still get women but I always feel as if something is missing. That feeling is lost when I travel outside of the U.S.

I can completely see how the tribal mindset can be almost paradise to some individuals. I remember watching a documentary on Netflix about a U.S. military guy walking across the DMZ into North Korean and leaving behind everything to join his enemy. I believe 6 soldiers in all had done that throughout the Korean War.
hammanta
Junior Poster
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:36 pm
Location: East Coast of USA

Re: The Savage Life

Postby Wolfeye » Sun Apr 03, 2016 4:02 pm

I wonder if maybe there's kind of a psychological scarring with things like this. I notice a lot of people (at least, I've run into it fairly commonly) have an issue with not having someone's commands to follow. It's like institutionalization, but for work as a general lifestyle. I don't think there's much to applaud with that lifestyle, honestly. Someone doesn't even comprehend something outside of doing as directed? That's, to my mind, is actually mental damage.

I get wanting stuff to do- but, in truth, there's no reason to believe that one would never get bored with this "theme of lifestyle." I've heard that boredom is a sign that you're not paying enough attention to things- it actually seems to work. It seems to dissolve that boredom to simply pay more attention to things. Doesn't have to be making any conclusions or discovering new things, just "intensifying" things on that level.
Wolfeye
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1130
Joined: Sun Dec 29, 2013 6:18 am

-----

Postby Ghost » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:53 pm

-----
Last edited by Ghost on Tue Oct 25, 2016 3:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
Ghost
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 5749
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:23 am

Re: The Savage Life

Postby The_Adventurer » Mon Apr 04, 2016 1:54 am

Wolfeye wrote:The Adventurer: Got some interest in the Philippines, could you go into more detail? They don't generally speak Spanish, right? And there's some nuances to living there (for a white man, especially), I hear. Besides little things here & there (mostly Kali-related), I don't know much about the Philippines.


Although it is a Spanish descended colony, they are still more Asian than Latin. They have their own languages, Tagalog in the north, Visayan in the middle and Marinau mostly in the south, and many other lesser known languages and dialects scattered about the many islands. Almost everywhere English is quite prevalent. It is not American English, nor is it really British English. It has evolved as sort of their own English and some minor things have different meanings than you might expect. All of it is very easy to get used to though.

The Spanish influence is mostly seen in some aspects of construction, especially the over done, huge catholic cathedrals. It also appears in the slow pace of life, which I hear is, or was in some cases, a common trait in most South American destinations.

The Philippines is probably the most well covered destination written about on this board, so I highly recommend searching around and getting a wide variety of opinions from various posters. Opinions may vary widely from love to hate. It depends on what will be the right place for you in the end.
“b***y is so strong that there are dudes willing to blow themselves up for the highly unlikely possibility of b***y in another dimension." -- Joe Rogan
User avatar
The_Adventurer
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:17 pm

Re: The Savage Life

Postby The_Adventurer » Mon Apr 04, 2016 2:00 am

hammanta wrote:I recall traveling with a few friends to a place in Zambales called Anawagin Cove. It is an isolated cove, only way in and out is by boat but is a tourist attraction place. There's no electricity and only semi running water. Showers are taken by filling up a bucket of cold water and dumping it on yourself. Same bucket is used for flushing the toilet. We planned on staying for 4 days but within the first few hours I wanted to leave. There was literally nothing to do except lay in your tent or walk the beach. By the 4th day I had become depressed because I was leaving.


That sounds like one of THEE most amazing experiences to have! I am curious, were smartphones popular back then? Did people really totally disconnect while out there? I can imagine someone today going to a place like that and spending it glued to their phone, until the battery ran out anyway.

I have to wonder if it would even be possible for someone from a heavily workaholic culture to make it through even 4 days in a place like that. As much as I want to, at this particular point in my adventure, I don't think I could handle it. I mean, the END, not the beginning.
“b***y is so strong that there are dudes willing to blow themselves up for the highly unlikely possibility of b***y in another dimension." -- Joe Rogan
User avatar
The_Adventurer
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:17 pm

Re: The Savage Life

Postby Adama » Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:24 am

Good thread, Adventurer. You have good interests. I never would have given it much thought other than as another factoid in the corner of my mind somewhere.
Look for women who automatically want to please you because it pleases them. Any woman who seeks to please her man is a treasure. Even better if you don't have to ask but rather suggest.
User avatar
Adama
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 3949
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:37 pm

Re: The Savage Life

Postby Cornfed » Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:46 am

You could search terms such as "anarcho-primitivism" and "anti-civ" for more information on this topic.
Cornfed
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4633
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 4:22 am

Re: The Savage Life

Postby zboy1 » Mon Apr 04, 2016 6:11 pm

Interesting thread guys! I too, sometimes wondered about this same topic as well; are humans better off living off the land or being 'slaves' in a capitalist system.

To be honest, all the things we've been taught: work your butt off and make money, pursue your dreams but don't enjoy your life--is that what life is all about? No, not in my opinion.
Find teaching jobs in China at http://workabroad.today
zboy1
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4441
Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:33 am

Re: The Savage Life

Postby hammanta » Mon Apr 04, 2016 10:50 pm

The_Adventurer wrote:
hammanta wrote:I recall traveling with a few friends to a place in Zambales called Anawagin Cove. It is an isolated cove, only way in and out is by boat but is a tourist attraction place. There's no electricity and only semi running water. Showers are taken by filling up a bucket of cold water and dumping it on yourself. Same bucket is used for flushing the toilet. We planned on staying for 4 days but within the first few hours I wanted to leave. There was literally nothing to do except lay in your tent or walk the beach. By the 4th day I had become depressed because I was leaving.


That sounds like one of THEE most amazing experiences to have! I am curious, were smartphones popular back then? Did people really totally disconnect while out there? I can imagine someone today going to a place like that and spending it glued to their phone, until the battery ran out anyway.

I have to wonder if it would even be possible for someone from a heavily workaholic culture to make it through even 4 days in a place like that. As much as I want to, at this particular point in my adventure, I don't think I could handle it. I mean, the END, not the beginning.


It was in 2009 so not that distant but smart phones had not really hit the Philippines hard. I had one of the earlier iphones but there was still no service. Don't get me wrong it wasn't as isolated as the Philippines can get. There were plenty of tourists from Manila (no foreigners) camping out and enjoying the experience as well but it made for an excellent bonding opportunity and caused you to branch out and meet new people. By Sunday the tourists left and it was just a few people left. At night we just sat by the campfire on the beach laying in the sand or in a hammock chatting the night away. I think someone had a guitar and there was a little stand set up by one of the local tribes on the island that sold red horse for pennies. The local tribe consisted of a few families that lived in the cove. We had to buy our food prior to coming so all meals a day were made over the fire.

Now I'm from a rural mountainous area in the U.S. where I hunt, fish, hike, and camp out regularly during the spring and summer but doing it in a culture not my own on a nice isolated beach was truly spectacular. There were no worries.

If you ever get the chance, check out Sagada. Truly a paradise located in the Philippines. A pretty touristy place but it is nestled right in the middle of the Cordillera mountain range and is a little village surrounded by massive rice terraces. Weather is awesome and the drive there is long but beautiful through winding roads, cliff faces, small villages, and 7000-8000 foot mountains.
hammanta
Junior Poster
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:36 pm
Location: East Coast of USA

Re: The Savage Life

Postby The_Adventurer » Tue Apr 05, 2016 10:53 am

hammanta wrote:Now I'm from a rural mountainous area in the U.S. where I hunt, fish, hike, and camp out regularly during the spring and summer but doing it in a culture not my own on a nice isolated beach was truly spectacular. There were no worries.


I had never been much of an outdoors person, but a few years ago I moved to a small mountain town in southern China, and started hiking in the mountains there. Granted, the mountains have mad made stairs, temples and statues of gods around, but it is still such a serene environment. Sometimes I would go up there and just sit there, doing nothing, especially after a fight with the wife. Few things I can find are so relaxing.


hammanta wrote: If you ever get the chance, check out Sagada. Truly a paradise located in the Philippines. A pretty touristy place but it is nestled right in the middle of the Cordillera mountain range and is a little village surrounded by massive rice terraces. Weather is awesome and the drive there is long but beautiful through winding roads, cliff faces, small villages, and 7000-8000 foot mountains.


This is something I am going to have to try next time I am in the Philippines. I hope it is soon.
“b***y is so strong that there are dudes willing to blow themselves up for the highly unlikely possibility of b***y in another dimension." -- Joe Rogan
User avatar
The_Adventurer
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1384
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 4:17 pm


Return to General Discussions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: zerowing1 and 7 guests