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Freelance SEO writing, my story...

Discuss working and making a living overseas, starting a business, or studying abroad.

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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Wed Oct 02, 2013 2:18 am

GenYguy wrote:
Ghost wrote:If I was back at that age and free, I would go the online route and do that as much as possible. Even if you're working 40, 50, 60 hours a week, sure beats working for someone else's benefit (while getting a paltry paycheck in return.) And by the time you're my age (26), you could move there permanently and find a nice little Filipina and stay with her, enjoying a fairly safe, stable, secure life that is - most importantly - happy. If only I had known then what I know now...that's what I would've done. I'm 26, have a bachelor's degree, have work experience, and am currently living and teaching in China. And I'll be taking my first trip to the Philippines in a month. I wish I had applied myself before and done it so much sooner.


Yeah, I've never liked the idea of working for someone elses benefit either. I'd rather build MYSELF up than build up some other guys presence, and I don't like being totally disposable. Though I know to work for myself, I need certain skills and attitudes. This forum is great for finding like minded people. :)

So that's another reason I've never had or wanted a traditional job. You're only 26, we're both still young :).


Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place. Until you have something to provide of value, don't go anywhere.
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Postby GenYguy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 3:40 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
GenYguy wrote:
Ghost wrote:If I was back at that age and free, I would go the online route and do that as much as possible. Even if you're working 40, 50, 60 hours a week, sure beats working for someone else's benefit (while getting a paltry paycheck in return.) And by the time you're my age (26), you could move there permanently and find a nice little Filipina and stay with her, enjoying a fairly safe, stable, secure life that is - most importantly - happy. If only I had known then what I know now...that's what I would've done. I'm 26, have a bachelor's degree, have work experience, and am currently living and teaching in China. And I'll be taking my first trip to the Philippines in a month. I wish I had applied myself before and done it so much sooner.


Yeah, I've never liked the idea of working for someone elses benefit either. I'd rather build MYSELF up than build up some other guys presence, and I don't like being totally disposable. Though I know to work for myself, I need certain skills and attitudes. This forum is great for finding like minded people. :)

So that's another reason I've never had or wanted a traditional job. You're only 26, we're both still young :).


Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place. Until you have something to provide of value, don't go anywhere.


Yeah, thanks for summing it up. Anyone have any more suggestions? Not just for me, but for other young guys who don't know what the hell they want to do (which means they most likely aren't very specialized yet..), but have decided they want to escape the US or whatever country they live in? We've all heard of teaching English, but what are some other unique and cool travel enabling jobs hardly anyone knows about, but someone out there is making a killing doing?? Anyone have any ideas?
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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:05 am

GenYguy wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:
GenYguy wrote:
Ghost wrote:If I was back at that age and free, I would go the online route and do that as much as possible. Even if you're working 40, 50, 60 hours a week, sure beats working for someone else's benefit (while getting a paltry paycheck in return.) And by the time you're my age (26), you could move there permanently and find a nice little Filipina and stay with her, enjoying a fairly safe, stable, secure life that is - most importantly - happy. If only I had known then what I know now...that's what I would've done. I'm 26, have a bachelor's degree, have work experience, and am currently living and teaching in China. And I'll be taking my first trip to the Philippines in a month. I wish I had applied myself before and done it so much sooner.


Yeah, I've never liked the idea of working for someone elses benefit either. I'd rather build MYSELF up than build up some other guys presence, and I don't like being totally disposable. Though I know to work for myself, I need certain skills and attitudes. This forum is great for finding like minded people. :)

So that's another reason I've never had or wanted a traditional job. You're only 26, we're both still young :).


Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place. Until you have something to provide of value, don't go anywhere.


Yeah, thanks for summing it up. Anyone have any more suggestions? Not just for me, but for other young guys who don't know what the hell they want to do (which means they most likely aren't very specialized yet..), but have decided they want to escape the US or whatever country they live in? We've all heard of teaching English, but what are some other unique and cool travel enabling jobs hardly anyone knows about, but someone out there is making a killing doing?? Anyone have any ideas?


I just had this conversation with another guy a day or two ago.

There are a limited number of fields available for those who are not specialized. This is not necessarily because foreigners are incapable of doing other jobs but because the respective governments of the countries foreigners want to work in limits the jobs to those that their own people are incapable of doing.

Teaching English - if you don't have a degree and/or TEFL certificate, you're going to be fairly limited to what you earn. Most guys in Thailand are making around $1000 a month, sometimes more, sometimes less. Those with solid credentials are making $45K+++. So in my opinion, if you don't have the credentials, unless you're willing to bust your ass or start up a company of your own like Ladislav, for the long term it's a dead end job. It might work for a couple of years until you can figure something else out but...you need to figure something out before you get too old and if you come back to the US or wherever you can only get a job at McDonalds or Wal-Mart because you have no job history and you're too old.

If you're asking about good-paying jobs that hardly anyone knows about, you need to do more yourself. YOU need to be the hustler and find the niche, find where you can provide a service or product that people need. Guys without skills aren't making a killing because someone told them about a job and they flew over and started working. The only exception I can think of is if you get in with a boiler room. You usually need someone to vouch for you though and if you get busted, you'll probably spend some time in jail, get deported, and blacklisted.

Many years ago I used to sell products from Asia. There were very few sites that looked good, provided good service, and had good products. So I did this for a couple of years and made anywhere from $2500 a month all the way up to $10K a month. Then people starting catching on, competition drove prices down, and it because much less worthwhile for me to do this. So I stopped and found another way to make money.

Nowadays many of the telecommuting jobs or other jobs abroad are already known. So you need the degree, the certification, whatever. To get an oil rig job - you need an in or certification. To be a teacher, in most places you need a degree. The answer is make your own job. But what job is up to you.

My buddy worked for an airline for many years. Against his better judgement, he quite and move to Thailand. He's working a job now where he's making 25,000 baht a month. He doesn't know what else to do than what he's doing, which is SEO. He works 6 days a week for shit. Why move? Better to get the credentials first and then move. Seriously.
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Postby Jester » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:08 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place. Until you have something to provide of value, don't go anywhere.



Second that.

And absolutely positively no more college for now. Get your grades this term to prove to yourself you can do it.

Then no more.

If you run up college loans, then drop out, they will take your passport away.

If you have the self-discipline to give up TV and video games, you have the self-discipline to succeed in online self-employment.

With your auditory situation, TEFL would be a poor choice.

The way you can pay your parents back is to thrive. That's what will thrill them.
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Postby Cornfed » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:21 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place.

Not necessarily. The trouble is that you never know what valuable skills there will be a market for at a given time and place. There a plenty of unemployed people with valuable skills. Many skills can only be utilized via the corporate system, and so if they don't want to hire you, you are out of luck. Most valued job skills can only be acquired from doing the job for several years in the first place, so if people only want to hire already skilled workers you are out of luck. Even if you get skills and experience, whole industries can be wiped out overnight. It is getting less and less likely that young men in the West will receive a payoff for whatever skills they acquire.
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Postby Cornfed » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:29 am

GenYguy wrote:Anyone have any ideas?

Just a thought. Would you be suitable for the security industry? It is a job that can sometimes be learned on the job by taking easy jobs and progressing to harder ones. It is a growing industry in most parts of the world, both as the social situation deteriorates and govts palm more of the role of police onto private security. This latter reason means that people with good communication skills are in demand in order to write incident reports, testify in court etc. You would probably have to do it where you are at first, but maybe you could subsequently become a consultant and transfer overseas.
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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:30 am

Cornfed wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place.

Not necessarily. The trouble is that you never know what valuable skills there will be a market for at a given time and place. There a plenty of unemployed people with valuable skills. Many skills can only be utilized via the corporate system, and so if they don't want to hire you, you are out of luck. Most valued job skills can only be acquired from doing the job for several years in the first place, so if people only want to hire already skilled workers you are out of luck. Even if you get skills and experience, whole industries can be wiped out overnight. It is getting less and less likely that young men in the West will receive a payoff for whatever skills they acquire.


This could happen, that could happen...yes, but the sky isn't falling. ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. So should I just forgo a f***ing education because something might happen? I don't think so. You have to take a chance one way or another and I'd much rather be the guy with skills than the guy without. If a person is sharp enough or they're a hustler, they'll figure it out. Period. But if they're asking what sort of job to do, that generally means they're going to work for someone else or a company. To do this, you need skills. I'll take having an education and skills over not having them any day of the week, even if whole industries can be wiped out overnight.
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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:44 am

Cornfed wrote:
GenYguy wrote:Anyone have any ideas?

Just a thought. Would you be suitable for the security industry? It is a job that can sometimes be learned on the job by taking easy jobs and progressing to harder ones. It is a growing industry in most parts of the world, both as the social situation deteriorates and govts palm more of the role of police onto private security. This latter reason means that people with good communication skills are in demand in order to write incident reports, testify in court etc. You would probably have to do it where you are at first, but maybe you could subsequently become a consultant and transfer overseas.


So he needs to acquire the skills before he transfers overseas, correct?

All the security guys I know, they got their jobs because they were in the military or are retired cops.
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Postby Cornfed » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:46 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:This could happen, that could happen...yes, but the sky isn't falling. ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. So should I just forgo a f***ing education because something might happen? I don't think so.

Like any gamble, you calculate the amount at risk and the odds and size of the potential payoff and make a decision on that basis. College in the West is now an insane gamble when evaluated by the usual standards for most young men.
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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:50 am

Cornfed wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:This could happen, that could happen...yes, but the sky isn't falling. ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. So should I just forgo a f***ing education because something might happen? I don't think so.

Like any gamble, you calculate the amount at risk and the odds and size of the potential payoff and make a decision on that basis. College in the West is now an insane gamble when evaluated by the usual standards for most young men.


Maybe so. But there are other ways to gain credentials, that's my point. A young kid with no credentials or acquired occupational skills is going to have to hustle to make a living.
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Postby Cornfed » Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:53 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:So he needs to acquire the skills before he transfers overseas, correct?

All the security guys I know, they got their jobs because they were in the military or are retired cops.

Yes, he would have to work locally until he had enough skills and contacts to bring something to the table. A lot of security are ex-ZOG goons, but it is still possible to start out checking bags at the supermarket or whatever and work your way up. Of course, that may change...
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Postby GenYguy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 6:03 am

Jester wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:
Get skills, build skills, make yourself valuable in some way. Once you do this, the rest will fall into place. Until you have something to provide of value, don't go anywhere.



Second that.

And absolutely positively no more college for now. Get your grades this term to prove to yourself you can do it.

Then no more.

If you run up college loans, then drop out, they will take your passport away.

If you have the self-discipline to give up TV and video games, you have the self-discipline to succeed in online self-employment.

With your auditory situation, TEFL would be a poor choice.

The way you can pay your parents back is to thrive. That's what will thrill them.


Thanks, I agree with all of that... only reason I am going to college is because my parents said I had to work or go to school after I spent two years doing nothing basically. I wasn't seriously thinking about working for myself at the time, so I went ahead and signed up for the semester I'm in now. I didn't know what else to do. I just knew that this time I had to do well, because this is my last chance to prove myself. I want to show my folks that I can make some money online to prove to them that I am serious about supporting myself, other than by doing well in school. I'd rather devote my time to one or the other. The only other option I had was trying to get a job at McDonalds or something similar, but I have sense enough to know that that won't get me anywhere in the long run, and as long as I'm living with my parents it isn't necessary. What's more important is setting up a successful future for myself, I realize that now.

I'm going to check out Odesk and Elance when I have time and let you guys know how that goes. :)
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Postby GenYguy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 6:18 am

Cornfed wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:This could happen, that could happen...yes, but the sky isn't falling. ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. So should I just forgo a f***ing education because something might happen? I don't think so.

Like any gamble, you calculate the amount at risk and the odds and size of the potential payoff and make a decision on that basis. College in the West is now an insane gamble when evaluated by the usual standards for most young men.


Yes what you're saying is along my line of thinking as well. Who's to say my degree will be worth anything in 10 years? Even if I go into a field that's projected to be in demand 10 years from now, it's still taking a long term calculated risk, and the more time between now and then increases the risk factor exponentially. What if an invention comes out that makes an entire industry obsolete for example?? Thinking long term is tricky...my generation is overall one of the least trusting generations ever. Lots of us are less trusting of authority than previous generations. We expect constant change. We even EXPECT chaos (look how the world has changed after 9/11). Looking at the world today, things are happening now that have never happened before in history. No economy has ever lasted and sustained itself, as a WORLD SUPER POWER, like America has, on a fiat currency. What's going to happen in my lifetime..??

Whereas taking a risk NOW in something that is proven to work for people RIGHT NOW, like the various ways people make money online filling an immediate need that people have, the risk is that YOU might fail fulfilling those needs, but there is NO risk that the need doesn't exist. That's why it's so tempting :P. I love helping people most of all.

Just to add my last thoughts on this, what's REALLY more useful? Creds, or skills to fulfill a need that lots of people need met NOW? In our instant gratification microwave culture, what seems the most valuable skill to me, is EFFICIENCY. Helping fulfill a need and doing so quickly. What's smarter, getting in debt now taking a large gamble on your future, or saving your money, learning a skill, and learning through trial and error how to efficiently fulfill a need that someone has, and in return GAINING money AND experience? And with the internet, you can teach yourself anything. Especially online work, can be learned... online. :D

Of course what do I know, lol...
Last edited by GenYguy on Wed Oct 02, 2013 7:02 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby GenYguy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 6:51 am

Cornfed wrote:
GenYguy wrote:Anyone have any ideas?

Just a thought. Would you be suitable for the security industry? It is a job that can sometimes be learned on the job by taking easy jobs and progressing to harder ones. It is a growing industry in most parts of the world, both as the social situation deteriorates and govts palm more of the role of police onto private security. This latter reason means that people with good communication skills are in demand in order to write incident reports, testify in court etc. You would probably have to do it where you are at first, but maybe you could subsequently become a consultant and transfer overseas.


Maybe.. but I'm looking for work I can take with me when I leave the US. I don't want to have to rely on a job located in the Philippines if I can help it. I don't want to be tethered down to a job, which is why I want to travel while I'm young in the first place.

Besides, traditional jobs, I've heard others say that foreigners don't really get hired in third world countries anyway (except as an English teacher as we all know, and call centers maybe?), so this would be a last ditch effort only. And getting paid local wages.. lol. It's not the worst thing in the world but it ain't ideal either. I would rather work here making enough USD to have a better standard of living in the Philippines, or find a reliable way to make USD while living abroad.
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Postby GenYguy » Wed Oct 02, 2013 6:54 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
Cornfed wrote:
anamericaninbangkok wrote:This could happen, that could happen...yes, but the sky isn't falling. ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. So should I just forgo a f***ing education because something might happen? I don't think so.

Like any gamble, you calculate the amount at risk and the odds and size of the potential payoff and make a decision on that basis. College in the West is now an insane gamble when evaluated by the usual standards for most young men.


Maybe so. But there are other ways to gain credentials, that's my point. A young kid with no credentials or acquired occupational skills is going to have to hustle to make a living.


Yeah, my new motto should be the one Rick Ross has: "everyday I'm hustlin" :D.
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