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Harder and tougher laws/requirements to live abroad

Discuss international visas, immigration and citizenship issues.

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Harder and tougher laws/requirements to live abroad

Postby polya » June 8th, 2009, 7:59 am

I'm really noticing that almost all countries are toughening up on their visa/immigration rules. More and more countries are bringing in 90/180 day rules (where you need to leave for 90 days after living for 90 days). This in itself financially prohibits immigration. I read that this 90/180 day rule is a World Trade Organisation requirement for all member countries.

Even the USA now requires tourists to give early notice of their trip - even if they are from visa-waiver counties (almost all western countries).

Citizenship is getting harder and harder - most countries now require 5 years of living in their country (up from 2 years), that you know their language....

Really, all these incremental changes will one day make it impossible to live anywhere else unless you have a student or working visa (which are usually too expensive for guys looking for love to get).

Has anyone else noticed this?? Does anyone have any ideas on countries that are still "free" to live in long term?

Because you don't want to leave your family, and she doesn't want to leave hers, you do need to spend long stays in eachother's country. I just wish there was a visa you could get to "spend time with your girl" that would be perfect!
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Re: Harder and tougher laws/requirements to live abroad

Postby momopi » June 8th, 2009, 7:07 pm

When the economy is doing well, countries welcome immigrant workers. When the economy is tough, they make it harder to immigrate, but lower the bar for foreign investors (provided that they invest to create jobs locally). i.e. both Taiwan and USA have reduced economic requirements for investor VISA (which grants long-term residency). For the US, the $ requirement for EB-5 greencard has been reduced by half in some areas. For some countries even if the requirement stays the same, the economic department handling the cases become much more agreeable and helpful. However this only applies to countries with free market economy and not those with strong protectionist culture.
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Postby ladislav » June 8th, 2009, 7:24 pm

If you have enough cash, rules will be bent for you.
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Postby COPE2 » December 13th, 2009, 11:35 am

They've just changed the rules in Britain making it 8yrs instead of 5 to become a citizen. you are also seeing this trend throughout europe. most of the laws are designed out of hatred for muslims, but when they make rules like that, it affects all immigrants. here are a few countries that have changed their laws to keep muslims out- danmark, netherlands, france. but ireland has also changed its laws, not just to keep muslims out, but everyone. it does not have anything to do with the economy because danmark and the netherlands changed theirs when the economy was strong. australia also changed alot of their laws at the height of their economic boom. other countries that are known for not liking foreigners are italy, germany. i dont know if you can find many european countries that actually like foreigners.
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Postby SNS » December 13th, 2009, 1:47 pm

COPE2 wrote:They've just changed the rules in Britain making it 8yrs instead of 5 to become a citizen. you are also seeing this trend throughout europe. most of the laws are designed out of hatred for muslims,

I am inclined to agree because it is my understanding that the owner of Harrods, which is GB most famous department store is an Egyptian and he has yet to be granted a British passport.
COPE2 wrote:other countries that are known for not liking foreigners are italy, germany. i dont know if you can find many european countries that actually like foreigners.

With regards to Germany, maybe so. It's hard to say. I have a residency permit to live there and the immigration people said that if I start a business in Germany they would approve me for unlimited stay status. Thing is, that even though I am american, I have a German last name and I'm white and look anglo German.

But ladislav is right that if one comes with a little bit of money and starts even a small business this is what most countries welcome.

Having said that, however for example it is becoming more difficult for americans to visit Russia. Visas are becoming more expensive and the allowed stays are shorter.
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Postby COPE2 » January 20th, 2010, 2:57 pm

all countries welcome rich people, but the fact remains that germany is anti foreigner. you can be born in germany and not get german citizenship. germany changed their laws from jus soli to Jus sanguinis, specifically to keep foreigners out. germany is also keeping new eu members out, despite agreeing to free labour movement throughout the eu. if a polish person wants to work in germany, he cant because the german laws are designed to keep foreigners like these out. on the other hand, polish can work in britain, and sweden without a visa. foreigners have to live in germany for 8yrs to become a citizen vs. 3yrs for canada.
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Postby MrPeabody » January 21st, 2010, 5:32 am

I obtained a high tech visa from the Netherlands over two years ago. It included a 30% tax ruling making 30% of my income tax free, the right to a driver's license just by exchanging your old one (a big deal because the drivers test in most european countries is tough and costly), a five year residence permit, and the right to apply for citizenship after five years. The company that hired me got the visa and it only took a few weeks. THe Netherlands offered this visa to attract high tech workers in which they have a shortage. However, with the economy now in a severe recession, I dont know how practical this option is anymore, but may be worth looking into if you have special technical skills.
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Postby ladislav » January 21st, 2010, 2:38 pm

In the Philippines you can come in on a 21 day visa upon arrival and then extend it by 38 days, Then you keep extending it every two months up to 16 months or even two years ( not sure). Then you can come out and come back after a while. The Philippines is wise in that it wants dollars and that is how they make their dollars. Every time you extend your tourist visa you pay $65-120. Then they have retiree visas and other visas all available if you have cash.
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Postby ladislav » January 21st, 2010, 2:39 pm

COPE2 wrote:all countries welcome rich people, but the fact remains that germany is anti foreigner. you can be born in germany and not get german citizenship. germany changed their laws from jus soli to Jus sanguinis, specifically to keep foreigners out. germany is also keeping new eu members out, despite agreeing to free labour movement throughout the eu. if a polish person wants to work in germany, he cant because the german laws are designed to keep foreigners like these out. on the other hand, polish can work in britain, and sweden without a visa. foreigners have to live in germany for 8yrs to become a citizen vs. 3yrs for canada.


I thought Germany changed jus sanguinis to jus solis in 2000. Did they change it back?
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Postby UVU » July 3rd, 2010, 6:45 pm

no. all european union countries are jus sanguinis
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Postby ladislav » July 4th, 2010, 3:05 am

In many countries if you marry the gal, you get permanent residency. 90 days is still enough to fall in love and all. The Philippines still has no 90 day visas and hopefully it won't ever have them.

no. all european union countries are jus sanguinis


Really? OK. One thing that most Americans do not understand and needs to be taught to them when they start traveling is that "while born in the USA" and "American born and raised" allows you to just run to the nearest city hall and get your birth certificate this does not work in most other countries. This is usually an American phenomenon. In other countries even if you walk in and ask for citizenship with a placenta hanging over you because " I was born here", they will just show you the door. And even if you get citizenship, ethnically you still do not have the nationality. This is why Europe has holocausts and all.
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Postby Adama » July 4th, 2010, 3:27 am

ladislav wrote:In many countries if you marry the gal, you get permanent residency. 90 days is still enough to fall in love and all. The Philippines still has no 90 day visas and hopefully it won't ever have them.

no. all european union countries are jus sanguinis


Really? OK. One thing that most Americans do not understand and needs to be taught to them when they start traveling is that "while born in the USA" and "American born and raised" allows you to just run to the nearest city hall and get your birth certificate this does not work in most other countries. This is usually an American phenomenon. In other countries even if you walk in and ask for citizenship with a placenta hanging over you because " I was born here", they will just show you the door. And even if you get citizenship, ethnically you still do not have the nationality. This is why Europe has holocausts and all.


I was with you up until the Holocaust part. That's hilarious, Ladislav. I see the connection.
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Postby ladislav » July 4th, 2010, 4:08 am

[
I was with you up until the Holocaust part. That's hilarious, Ladislav. I see the connection.


Jews lived as non citizens in European countries for centuries if not millenia.

Kissinger and Einstein are "Germans" to Americans only.

Plus a European's eye can spot a Jew by looking at him, an American's eye usually cannot. Jews look 'white' and fall into the Caucasian category.

Many of these countries offered Jews citizenship if they would convert. No conversion, no citizenship. Born there or not. A dog born in the stables is not a horse. That is why they lived in ghettos and were kicked out of country after country. Countries do not expel citizens. Jews got expelled. Gypsies also were not citizens. They were born in all these countries but they live in caravans plus nationality has nothing with birthplace in Europe. The gypsies do not recognize all these nation states and they are just gypsies.
When Jews got to these former British empire countries this is when they were able to get citizenship because of birth citizenship laws. And even gypsies who were in the US could now call themselves Americans. None of that would have been possible in Europe.
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Postby zzzz » October 21st, 2010, 4:27 am

ladislav wrote:In the Philippines you can come in on a 21 day visa upon arrival and then extend it by 38 days, Then you keep extending it every two months up to 16 months or even two years ( not sure). Then you can come out and come back after a while. The Philippines is wise in that it wants dollars and that is how they make their dollars. Every time you extend your tourist visa you pay $65-120. Then they have retiree visas and other visas all available if you have cash.


So you can definitely stay for 6 months or so and just renew it in the country no problem? I thought you had to fly out then come back in after 59 days? Or is that incorrect?
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Postby ladislav » October 21st, 2010, 4:37 am

zzzz wrote:
ladislav wrote:In the Philippines you can come in on a 21 day visa upon arrival and then extend it by 38 days, Then you keep extending it every two months up to 16 months or even two years ( not sure). Then you can come out and come back after a while. The Philippines is wise in that it wants dollars and that is how they make their dollars. Every time you extend your tourist visa you pay $65-120. Then they have retiree visas and other visas all available if you have cash.


So you can definitely stay for 6 months or so and just renew it in the country no problem? I thought you had to fly out then come back in after 59 days? Or is that incorrect?


The flying out every two months is for Thailand, not Philippines. And Thailand is the one that is imposing one rule after another.
The Philippines is trying to attract people, not push them away.
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