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Harder and tougher laws/requirements to live abroad

Discuss international visas, immigration and citizenship issues.

Moderators: fschmidt, jamesbond

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » May 25th, 2013, 6:59 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
Thais know exactly what foreigners are trying to do in getting long-term education and tourist visas. If you want to live in the country, you really need to do things legally. The days of old are pretty much gone. ...............

If you're on an education visa you need to go to the class. You do know that if you just pay for an education visa and blow it off that in doing so you could be deported? Some of the schools will report you if you don't go. You have to pay for the tuition and it helps to know Thai so why ask for trouble? Why not just go to class? It's only like 4 hours a week!
This is exactly why I had not viewed the education visa as a good path. Increasing hassle.

But four hours a week - is great news. I had no idea it was such a small time commitment. I was expecting ot to be about 20 hours a week like a normal total-immersion language school.
anamericaninbangkok wrote: It is no piece of cake to gain residency here, it's expensive, and the benefits are few IMO. You need to be here 3 years straight on a one-year visa (no problem here)
So education visa can be done for three years straight wothout leaving (if legitimately atttending class)? Excellent!
anamericaninbangkok wrote: AND the Thai government only grants 100 residency permits a year.
This sounds like you'te talking about citizenship, not residency. The ceremony where you swear allegiance to the king.

anamericaninbangkok wrote: ......you would need to fly to somewhere that gives multiple entry tourist visas, like Savannakhet in Laos.... You'll receive a 6 month multiple entry tourist visa. ......Anyhow, you come back to Thailand, at the end of the two months, go to immigration and get a 30-day extension. At the end of that 30 days, you need to do a visa run.
So you get a 6 month visa but have to leave in 90 days? Not impressive.
anamericaninbangkok wrote: Bangkok's airports are very mellow compared to the US airports. The do use scanners but they're the old style scanners.
By old style do you mean a tunnel or chamber-like radiation scanner where you stand still, or do you mean the simple rectangular-pipe metal detector that you just walk straight through - which has been in use since the 1970's?

anamericaninbangkok
Junior Poster
Posts: 564
Joined: May 11th, 2013, 7:23 am
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

Post by anamericaninbangkok » May 25th, 2013, 6:59 pm

Visa runs can be a hassle if you let them be or if you have no other choice. As I said, if you have the funds and the proper documents, a visa that allows you to stay for a year is relatively straightforward and easy. Obviously the Thai government does not want perpetual tourists (although it is still fairly easy to be one IMO).

Residency is set at 100 permits per year per nationality. Residency can be obtained after 3 years, citizenship is after 10.

Rectangular, walk-through type metal detectors.

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » May 28th, 2013, 4:25 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
Rectangular, walk-through type metal detectors.
THANKS FOR THE INFO!

They did buy Michael Chertoff's radiation scanners. And not using them! This has happened in many places. Countries must be under U.S. pressure to buy them, but then don't see the point in annoying or irradiating travelers.

Anyway, thanks to your info on education visa and no radiation at airports - Thailand is definitely back on the menu.

Thanks again.

ph
Freshman Poster
Posts: 29
Joined: September 17th, 2013, 12:45 pm

Post by ph » September 17th, 2013, 1:26 pm

Im in China right now due to a internship I have.

Here is something I have heard and know about getting even permanent residence or citizenship in china. I know there are foreigners who love china a lot, they want to live there. But here is the truth:

Getting PR is already hard- I know that china is overpopulated, they have more people then they could handle. So unless they made a special or special contribution to China, its not likely to happen. Best is a business or working visa which is renewable.

Citizenship- almost impossible for a foreigner unless very extraordinary contribution. Otherwise there aren't any benefits to getting that except not being hassled by the border or immigration.

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » September 18th, 2013, 8:00 am

ladislav wrote:[
I was with you up until the Holocaust part. That's hilarious, Ladislav. I see the connection.
Jews lived as non citizens in European countries for centuries if not millenia.

Kissinger and Einstein are "Germans" to Americans only.

Plus a European's eye can spot a Jew by looking at him, an American's eye usually cannot. Jews look 'white' and fall into the Caucasian category.

Many of these countries offered Jews citizenship if they would convert. No conversion, no citizenship. Born there or not. A dog born in the stables is not a horse. That is why they lived in ghettos and were kicked out of country after country. Countries do not expel citizens. Jews got expelled. Gypsies also were not citizens. They were born in all these countries but they live in caravans plus nationality has nothing with birthplace in Europe. The gypsies do not recognize all these nation states and they are just gypsies.
When Jews got to these former British empire countries this is when they were able to get citizenship because of birth citizenship laws. And even gypsies who were in the US could now call themselves Americans. None of that would have been possible in Europe.
So we HA-ers are the new gypsies....

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » September 18th, 2013, 8:04 am

ladislav wrote:After 6 months you need to get a clearance if you want to leave- it is a pain and I do not like it. So, I prefer to leave before 6 months expire.
Nice tip.

So you're doing a voluntary "visa run"?

Do you keep your same ID as you leave and return?

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » September 18th, 2013, 8:07 am

YoucancallmeAl wrote:
......a flier distribution service, i.e. -putting business' ad fliers on doors)
And I'd love to find a foreign country where I could start doing the same business. But I doubt there's a country that would give me residence just to do my flier service. Right? If there is, let me know!

Paraguay. Nowhere else can you start with no capital, legally do the work yourself, compete with locals, and be a legal resident.

Healthy economy too.
Last edited by Jester on September 18th, 2013, 8:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 7875
Joined: January 20th, 2009, 10:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Post by Jester » September 18th, 2013, 8:20 am

YoucancallmeAl wrote:
SNS wrote: But ladislav is right that if one comes with a little bit of money and starts even a small business this is what most countries welcome.
But don't you need to show you have enough investment capitol?
If you can design fliers for OTHERS to distribute, and sell this design service ONLINE, and build it to a little over $1000 a month, Germany will welcome you.

OR -- Around $1500 a month ONLINE needed to do get residency in Mexico. Once you get there, the actual flier distribution would have to be done off the books, for cash, till you could go thru hoops to make it legal, with employees doing the work.

OR -- Latin countries and probably others would let you distribute fliers locally, but they DO require various investment capital amounts, plus incorporation and tax filing, and you have to hire employees right away, and you can't run the fliers yourself.

Best place, with no restrictions, would be Paraguay.

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