Join John Adams, world renowned Intl Matchmaker, Thurs nights 8:30 EST for Live Webcasts with FREE Prizes!
And check out Five Reasons why you should attend a FREE Live AFA Seminar! See locations and details.


Scam free! Check out Christian Filipina - Meet Asian women with Christian values! Members screened.
Exclusive book offer! 75% off! How to Meet, Date and Marry Your Filipina Wife



View Active Topics       Latest 100 Topics       View Your Posts       FAQ Topics       Switch to Mobile


-----

Ask questions and get advice, or share advice. Disclaimer: Any advice you take here is at your own risk. We are not liable for any consequences you might incur from following someone's advice here.
Note: Before posting your question, do a search for it in the Google Search box at the top to see if it's already been addressed.

Moderators: jamesbond, fschmidt

-----

Postby Ghost » Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:19 am

-----
Last edited by Ghost on Fri Oct 28, 2016 4:52 am, edited 2 times in total.
Ghost
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 5749
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:23 am







Re: I need a plan! What can I do?

Postby Rock » Sun Jun 05, 2011 12:28 pm

Ghost wrote:Ok, so I have lots of ideas, but few concrete plans. This is one area where I tend to have trouble with: I'll come up with and gather dozens of ideas that are appealing, and then be overwhelmed by everything that I neglect to focus on one thing so I'll get relatively little accomplished.

However, by now, I have a more concrete idea of what I want to do in the near future. The country I want to go to is the Philippines. I had been interested in it being a place to go, but now I really want to. I'm reading and learning more and more about it. I'm also talking to a nice Filipina and want to meet her eventually.

Here's the thing: When it comes to going abroad, I am more interested in the long term and being able to stay abroad for as long as I would like instead of just taking trips. (I do also want to take a trip, or two, or three *ahem* for getting laid basically. More on that later.)

Obviously one of the best ways to live abroad is to work abroad also. Otherwise, I could just save up money for trips, and it would be short term things. I'm going to lay out my resources, and if anyone could give me advice on how I can go and stay abroad for the long-term, I would appreciate it! Here's what I've got:

1. A bachelor's degree - Education/English. One of my desires is to teach English in a foreign land. Obviously, that would be a great way to live abroad longer term. I know that it is possible that an American with a decent command of English could be a teacher of English abroad, but I hope my degree will help me that much more. What kind of additional certification or whatever do I need in addition to my degree to help me even more? Or do I even need anything additional with my degree. And does anyone know of good ways to go about teaching English in the Philippines? Because that is where I truly wish to go.

2. Money in the bank. Approximately $4500 so far. I make about $1000 a month at my job, give or take a little. Although I do not make much, I save the vast majority of what I do earn, and am trying to build a nest-egg. What is the best way to use my money?

3. No debt. I owe nothing to anyone. I have a paid for degree, vehicle, no rent or food expenses. This means I'm not a financial slave and have more freedom and options since I'm not making payments to someone every month.

Those are my main resources, and although I keep adding to them (mostly by saving money) progress is slow and I feel like I'm not going to get to where I need to be to make this dream happen.

As far as living longer term in the Philippines, I am willing to live frugally. I'm not looking to live like a rockstar there. The one thing I am willing to spend on is getting laid, which is something I want to do first, before having a girlfriend there. It's just a little issue I need to take care of...(Actually, I'll probably make another advice thread sometime about that so as to keep this one track.) Anyway, I know pretty much that I need an income there in order to live there. Besides teaching English there, are there "regular" jobs I could get hired to do, or are there decent business ideas for Americans in the Philippines. (I'm not really the entrepreneurial type, but where there's a will, there's a way I suppose.) Whatever it takes, I want to do it, eventually. I am patient, and am not trying to go tomorrow, but being happier abroad is a dream I am not willing to relinquish! If anyone who has experience with the Philippines has advice I would greatly appreciate it! (Or any good ideas at all, I'm all ears!)

And thanks again Winston for the site! It draws me back to it, and is one of the things that gives me hope for the future! Now I just have to work for that future.


Hi Ghost

Congrats on figuring out where you wanna settle eventually. Here's a practical idea you could consider to get started right away:

1. If you're not entrepreneurial, don't have an advanced business or technical degree, or have the skills to create an income generating website, it will be extremely difficult to make serious money in PI. And as I know, English teaching pay there sucks. So bypass PI, and teach intensively in Taiwan on a short-term basis. You could probably swing US$2,000-3,000 per month pretty easily with living costs similar to PI - well under US$1,000 per month.

2. Taiwan is very close to PI and flights from Taipei to Clark are dirt cheap. So you could take lots of short trips down between your teaching sessions and for long term during extended national holidays like the Lunar Chinese New Year OR you could choose to take-off 3-4 months a year to live in PI without working. I met an American girl who teaches English to children in Taiwan and goes to PI once per month for several days just for volunteer work, all on a very tight budget.

3. Eventually, after you save enough money, you could invest in rentable condos in PI or other higher yielding products in order to generate passive investment income. Property and other such investments would probably require minimum capital of US$20,000 to US$30,000 but with a 10% return, you would take work pressure off yourself as you accumulated them.

4. If you are reasonably frugal and invest well in high income generating assets, you could build-up quite an impressive passive income within a few years, settle permanently in PI, and live happily ever after with your Filipina. Good luck.
Last edited by Rock on Sun Jun 05, 2011 2:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Rock
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4120
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby Contrarian Expatriate » Sun Jun 05, 2011 12:41 pm

If I were you, I would get a second job part-time just to boost your savings. You should aim for 100,000 cash in the bank before you move abroad. Once there, you can live cheaply and find work over there (if you can do it legally).

The next step is to invest in obtaining a skill that you can do anywhere. Can you build web pages, or write code, or fix laptops, or speak Tagalog? If you speak Tagalog, you are more marketable to take any job in the Philippines. The trouble with that is you MUST be sure that is the country you want to settle in.

Do you have a passport yet?

Try to write down your goal, then write down the various objectives you must meet to attain that goal.
Feel free to visit my sites and to leave your respected words of wisdom:

http://thedeclineofmyamerica.blogspot.com/

http://www.youtube.com/user/ContrarianExpatriate
Contrarian Expatriate
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1404
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2009 5:57 am

Re: I need a plan! What can I do?

Postby Adama » Sun Jun 05, 2011 3:37 pm

Rock wrote:
3. Eventually, after you save enough money, you could invest in rentable condos in PI or other higher yielding products in order to generate passive investment income. Property and other such investments would probably require minimum capital of US$20,000 to US$30,000 but with a 10% return, you would take work pressure off yourself as you accumulated them.


Is $30,000 total investment or downpayment on a rentable condo?
User avatar
Adama
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 3949
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:37 pm

Postby E_Irizarry » Sun Jun 05, 2011 4:08 pm

I feel that my boy Contrarian Expat is a little extreme on what is required to save up before moving abroad. 100, 000 is definitely a safety net due to the waning value of the greenback worldwide (although there are still a lot of countries in which you would get a favorable exchange rate)...but it's not the etched floor that must be met.

I feel 50, 000 is the absolute minimum. It took me 3 1/2 years to spend up 34.5 grand (i.e. $34,500 USD convertible), but I had spread that out in Thailand, the Philippines (where most of my money went down the drain - some of it lost over inflation/overpaying for shit (don't go there and accuse me of P4P..f**k you guys that want to hang me out to dry for that (that was bi-polar moment jajajaa lol!)); Chile (almost as expensive as Brasil, and slight more expensive than Colombia); Perú; Bolivia; Ecuador; and Brasil & Colombia killed my pockets with the finishing touch *sigh*. *Jumps back and kisses himself*

And since I know Spanish, I hardly was f***ed over in South America in contrast to Pinoys (Filipinos) that speak rudimentary English, Tagalog, Ilocano, and Chavacano (which is old-school, Castillian Spanish - which I got by fine) that got over on me way more times than I have realized.

But like a previous poster said on here, if you haven't mastered an idiom besides English, nor have an IT/Eng. degree/tech diploma, nor have strong related-familial ties in the foreign country you want to expatriate to, then you better have 50, 000 in order to allot yourself time to get up to speed meeting those aforementioned prerequisites.

However, however, it's like the guys whom haven't graduated from university (i.e. Puff Daddy/P. Diddy, Bill Gates, and the Korean-Am siblings in So. Cal. that are running a social site and only are 18 or something), ONE CAN MAKE IT AD-HOC-WISE (i.e. hitting the ground running) in a foreign country on the strength of beginning with savings of 10 to 15 grand or less.

That means one would have to become/be frugal (don't get it confused with being cheap), and pick up on the culture and the idiom fast enough if applicable.

So going to countries where the economy, the scene and how they were "feeling" me interpolates into how long one will make it in the abroad country.

I made the mistake of going to countries that weren't "feeling" me in combo with a lackluster economy.

In another words, I should have gone back to Brasil first and foremost upon when I first began to spend my savings.

Now I am back in the US of Gay trying to save up again. I'm not fretting; I have already sketched out a schematic blueprint of how I'm going to return to BR once and for all and become a citizen there.

I am not trying to scare people; I'm just telling it like it is.
"I appreciate the opportunities I have in America. Opportunities that allow me to live abroad." **Smiles** - Have2Fly@H.A. (2013)

"The only way to overcome that is to go abroad to get a broad."
- E. Irizarry (2009)

"MGTOW resilience is the key to foreign residence. You better muthafuckin' ask somebody!!"
- E. Irizarry (2012)

"I rather be ostracized by 157.0 million (27.3% of the US of Gay pop), then to appease 1 feminist." - E. Irizarry (2013)

TanBoy by DNA | Despedido, Hugo Chavez...Descansa en paz!
E_Irizarry
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2352
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2008 8:07 am
Location: The Corporation ( the U.S. of Gay )

Re: I need a plan! What can I do?

Postby Rock » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:09 pm

Adama wrote:
Rock wrote:
3. Eventually, after you save enough money, you could invest in rentable condos in PI or other higher yielding products in order to generate passive investment income. Property and other such investments would probably require minimum capital of US$20,000 to US$30,000 but with a 10% return, you would take work pressure off yourself as you accumulated them.


Is $30,000 total investment or downpayment on a rentable condo?


1. During my last visit to Angeles, I checked-out a new Condohotel being built right-off Fields Ave. The smaller units are being sold for about US$75-80K equivalent in Pesos and low rate US$ financing is available to qualified foreigners through nearby HSBC branch for up to 65% of purchase amount. With these units, you leave your condo to the hotel pool when not using it yourself and are entitled to 50% of the revenue. Projected returns @70% estimated annual occupancy are very attractive and up to now, Angeles has a room shortage, especially at the higher end, opposite of Pattaya.

2. For minimum entry of US$20,000, there are stable financial products available which pay a cash dividend of 0.8% per month (~9.6% annualized).
Last edited by Rock on Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Rock
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4120
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby Rock » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:12 pm

E_Irizarry wrote:I feel that my boy Contrarian Expat is a little extreme on what is required to save up before moving abroad. 100, 000 is definitely a safety net due to the waning value of the greenback worldwide (although there are still a lot of countries in which you would get a favorable exchange rate)...but it's not the etched floor that must be met.

I feel 50, 000 is the absolute minimum. It took me 3 1/2 years to spend up 34.5 grand (i.e. $34,500 USD convertible), but I had spread that out in Thailand, the Philippines (where most of my money went down the drain - some of it lost over inflation/overpaying for shit (don't go there and accuse me of P4P..f**k you guys that want to hang me out to dry for that (that was bi-polar moment jajajaa lol!)); Chile (almost as expensive as Brasil, and slight more expensive than Colombia); Perú; Bolivia; Ecuador; and Brasil & Colombia killed my pockets with the finishing touch *sigh*. *Jumps back and kisses himself*

And since I know Spanish, I hardly was f***ed over in South America in contrast to Pinoys (Filipinos) that speak rudimentary English, Tagalog, Ilocano, and Chavacano (which is old-school, Castillian Spanish - which I got by fine) that got over on me way more times than I have realized.

But like a previous poster said on here, if you haven't mastered an idiom besides English, nor have an IT/Eng. degree/tech diploma, nor have strong related-familial ties in the foreign country you want to expatriate to, then you better have 50, 000 in order to allot yourself time to get up to speed meeting those aforementioned prerequisites.

However, however, it's like the guys whom haven't graduated from university (i.e. Puff Daddy/P. Diddy, Bill Gates, and the Korean-Am siblings in So. Cal. that are running a social site and only are 18 or something), ONE CAN MAKE IT AD-HOC-WISE (i.e. hitting the ground running) in a foreign country on the strength of beginning with savings of 10 to 15 grand or less.

That means one would have to become/be frugal (don't get it confused with being cheap), and pick up on the culture and the idiom fast enough if applicable.

So going to countries where the economy, the scene and how they were "feeling" me interpolates into how long one will make it in the abroad country.

I made the mistake of going to countries that weren't "feeling" me in combo with a lackluster economy.

In another words, I should have gone back to Brasil first and foremost upon when I first began to spend my savings.

Now I am back in the US of Gay trying to save up again. I'm not fretting; I have already sketched out a schematic blueprint of how I'm going to return to BR once and for all and become a citizen there.

I am not trying to scare people; I'm just telling it like it is.


If you gotta few grand US$ saved-up, have a bachelors degree, are white or black and speak native level English, Taiwan is a safe starting bet. You can pretty much fly over and walk into a teaching job within a month as long as you don't like like a total mess. Opportunities are especially abundant if you are willing to teach children.
Rock
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4120
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby E_Irizarry » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:18 pm

Rock wrote:
E_Irizarry wrote:I feel that my boy Contrarian Expat is a little extreme on what is required to save up before moving abroad. 100, 000 is definitely a safety net due to the waning value of the greenback worldwide (although there are still a lot of countries in which you would get a favorable exchange rate)...but it's not the etched floor that must be met.

I feel 50, 000 is the absolute minimum. It took me 3 1/2 years to spend up 34.5 grand (i.e. $34,500 USD convertible), but I had spread that out in Thailand, the Philippines (where most of my money went down the drain - some of it lost over inflation/overpaying for shit (don't go there and accuse me of P4P..f**k you guys that want to hang me out to dry for that (that was bi-polar moment jajajaa lol!)); Chile (almost as expensive as Brasil, and slight more expensive than Colombia); Perú; Bolivia; Ecuador; and Brasil & Colombia killed my pockets with the finishing touch *sigh*. *Jumps back and kisses himself*

And since I know Spanish, I hardly was f***ed over in South America in contrast to Pinoys (Filipinos) that speak rudimentary English, Tagalog, Ilocano, and Chavacano (which is old-school, Castillian Spanish - which I got by fine) that got over on me way more times than I have realized.

But like a previous poster said on here, if you haven't mastered an idiom besides English, nor have an IT/Eng. degree/tech diploma, nor have strong related-familial ties in the foreign country you want to expatriate to, then you better have 50, 000 in order to allot yourself time to get up to speed meeting those aforementioned prerequisites.

However, however, it's like the guys whom haven't graduated from university (i.e. Puff Daddy/P. Diddy, Bill Gates, and the Korean-Am siblings in So. Cal. that are running a social site and only are 18 or something), ONE CAN MAKE IT AD-HOC-WISE (i.e. hitting the ground running) in a foreign country on the strength of beginning with savings of 10 to 15 grand or less.

That means one would have to become/be frugal (don't get it confused with being cheap), and pick up on the culture and the idiom fast enough if applicable.

So going to countries where the economy, the scene and how they were "feeling" me interpolates into how long one will make it in the abroad country.

I made the mistake of going to countries that weren't "feeling" me in combo with a lackluster economy.

In another words, I should have gone back to Brasil first and foremost upon when I first began to spend my savings.

Now I am back in the US of Gay trying to save up again. I'm not fretting; I have already sketched out a schematic blueprint of how I'm going to return to BR once and for all and become a citizen there.

I am not trying to scare people; I'm just telling it like it is.


If you gotta few grand US$ saved-up, have a bachelors degree, are white or black and speak native level English, Taiwan is a safe starting bet. You can pretty much fly over and walk into a teaching job within a month as long as you don't like like a total mess. Opportunities are especially abundant if you are willing to teach children.


See I don't have a Bachelor's, but are there ways around that by talking CELTA or TESOL and have them look for countries for you abroad?
"I appreciate the opportunities I have in America. Opportunities that allow me to live abroad." **Smiles** - Have2Fly@H.A. (2013)

"The only way to overcome that is to go abroad to get a broad."
- E. Irizarry (2009)

"MGTOW resilience is the key to foreign residence. You better muthafuckin' ask somebody!!"
- E. Irizarry (2012)

"I rather be ostracized by 157.0 million (27.3% of the US of Gay pop), then to appease 1 feminist." - E. Irizarry (2013)

TanBoy by DNA | Despedido, Hugo Chavez...Descansa en paz!
E_Irizarry
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2352
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2008 8:07 am
Location: The Corporation ( the U.S. of Gay )

Postby Rock » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:34 pm

E_Irizarry wrote:
Rock wrote:
E_Irizarry wrote:I feel that my boy Contrarian Expat is a little extreme on what is required to save up before moving abroad. 100, 000 is definitely a safety net due to the waning value of the greenback worldwide (although there are still a lot of countries in which you would get a favorable exchange rate)...but it's not the etched floor that must be met.

I feel 50, 000 is the absolute minimum. It took me 3 1/2 years to spend up 34.5 grand (i.e. $34,500 USD convertible), but I had spread that out in Thailand, the Philippines (where most of my money went down the drain - some of it lost over inflation/overpaying for shit (don't go there and accuse me of P4P..f**k you guys that want to hang me out to dry for that (that was bi-polar moment jajajaa lol!)); Chile (almost as expensive as Brasil, and slight more expensive than Colombia); Perú; Bolivia; Ecuador; and Brasil & Colombia killed my pockets with the finishing touch *sigh*. *Jumps back and kisses himself*

And since I know Spanish, I hardly was f***ed over in South America in contrast to Pinoys (Filipinos) that speak rudimentary English, Tagalog, Ilocano, and Chavacano (which is old-school, Castillian Spanish - which I got by fine) that got over on me way more times than I have realized.

But like a previous poster said on here, if you haven't mastered an idiom besides English, nor have an IT/Eng. degree/tech diploma, nor have strong related-familial ties in the foreign country you want to expatriate to, then you better have 50, 000 in order to allot yourself time to get up to speed meeting those aforementioned prerequisites.

However, however, it's like the guys whom haven't graduated from university (i.e. Puff Daddy/P. Diddy, Bill Gates, and the Korean-Am siblings in So. Cal. that are running a social site and only are 18 or something), ONE CAN MAKE IT AD-HOC-WISE (i.e. hitting the ground running) in a foreign country on the strength of beginning with savings of 10 to 15 grand or less.

That means one would have to become/be frugal (don't get it confused with being cheap), and pick up on the culture and the idiom fast enough if applicable.

So going to countries where the economy, the scene and how they were "feeling" me interpolates into how long one will make it in the abroad country.

I made the mistake of going to countries that weren't "feeling" me in combo with a lackluster economy.

In another words, I should have gone back to Brasil first and foremost upon when I first began to spend my savings.

Now I am back in the US of Gay trying to save up again. I'm not fretting; I have already sketched out a schematic blueprint of how I'm going to return to BR once and for all and become a citizen there.

I am not trying to scare people; I'm just telling it like it is.


If you gotta few grand US$ saved-up, have a bachelors degree, are white or black and speak native level English, Taiwan is a safe starting bet. You can pretty much fly over and walk into a teaching job within a month as long as you don't like like a total mess. Opportunities are especially abundant if you are willing to teach children.


See I don't have a Bachelor's, but are there ways around that by talking CELTA or TESOL and have them look for countries for you abroad?


Not 100% sure but traditionally, I believe the Ministry of Education has wanted to see some kind of proof of a 4 year college or uni degree to grant a work permit. Perhaps specialized English teaching credentials attainable in much shorter periods could circumvent that requirement. I would have to check it out to be sure.
Rock
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4120
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Re: I need a plan! What can I do?

Postby Jackal » Sun Jun 05, 2011 6:41 pm

Hmm...everyone is giving very complex answers and suggesting a very high amount of savings.

You could just do things the simple-minded, easy way like I did:
-Apply for jobs while you're still at home. Get hired while you're still at home (some countries may not do this and may require a demo lesson, but in that case, you should have contacted several schools which are good possibilities). Since you have a degree, I don't think you'll have such a hard time finding a job, but I don't know anything about the English teaching market in the Philippines.

-Pay for the plane ticket with your credit card. Use your savings for living expenses and fees during the first few months while you are getting your bank account and paperwork set up so you can get paid normally.

-Learn the local language, explore the country, and have fun!

Don't be too worried about finally taking the plunge! You can't wait and plan forever! You've got a bit of money and a degree (other people will have to tell you whether it would be advantageous for you to get a CELTA/TEFL certificate or not). Nothing more is needed besides an adventurous spirit!
Jackal
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1229
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:24 am
Location: Hungary

Re: I need a plan! What can I do?

Postby Rock » Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:01 pm

Jackal wrote:Hmm...everyone is giving very complex answers and suggesting a very high amount of savings.

You could just do things the simple-minded, easy way like I did:
-Apply for jobs while you're still at home. Get hired while you're still at home (some countries may not do this and may require a demo lesson, but in that case, you should have contacted several schools which are good possibilities). Since you have a degree, I don't think you'll have such a hard time finding a job, but I don't know anything about the English teaching market in the Philippines.

-Pay for the plane ticket with your credit card. Use your savings for living expenses and fees during the first few months while you are getting your bank account and paperwork set up so you can get paid normally.

-Learn the local language, explore the country, and have fun!

Don't be too worried about finally taking the plunge! You can't wait and plan forever! You've got a bit of money and a degree (other people will have to tell you whether it would be advantageous for you to get a CELTA/TEFL certificate or not). Nothing more is needed besides an adventurous spirit!


Well, I also suggested that he could go with minimal savings as long as he started out in a safe country like Taiwan, less than 2 hours away and under US$100 one way by air.

Thing about teaching English in PI, you gotta wonder, why don't any of our on-the-ground guys do it? Lad teaches online, Mr. S does something more professional, and Winston runs a site plus freelances as an editor. I suspect straight-up English teaching work in PI sucks, both pay and condition wise.

But that in turn throws-up some new ideas. Perhaps Winston could get him set-up with the type of work he does since he hates it so much, lol. It actually pays pretty well if you are fast like Winston. Or maybe Lad could show him how to get set-up teaching English online to Russians and Chinese.

I have seen a certain type of foreigner both in Thailand and PI who for whatever reason runs-out of money and gets stuck. If you stay too long, deplete your resources, and get too old, you can find yourself shit out of luck - not able to find employment back in your home country and too desperate looking to get hired as a local English teacher. I imagine those types got to that state by getting caught-up in sex and/or drug addiction or just have serious psychological issues. Easily avoidable if you keep your head on straight. Just a note of caution, not trying to fear monger.
Rock
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 4120
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby Hero » Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:55 pm

I only have about $9500 in cash. No way I'm gonna wait until I have $50,000.
Hero
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1679
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 8:19 pm

Postby Ghost » Sun Jun 05, 2011 7:58 pm

-----
Last edited by Ghost on Fri Oct 28, 2016 4:51 am, edited 2 times in total.
Ghost
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 5749
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:23 am

Postby Hero » Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:07 pm

I could save up $20,000 in cash fairly quickly too, but there are so many other ways I can put my money to use. Still trying to figure out how to allocate my paycheck among cash and stocks. Quite a challenge, to say the least.
Hero
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1679
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 8:19 pm

Postby Ghost » Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:08 pm

-----
Last edited by Ghost on Sat Oct 22, 2016 2:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ghost
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 5749
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:23 am

Next

Return to Questions and Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests