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Staying Put! :shock:

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Jester
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Staying Put! :shock:

Post by Jester » May 12th, 2012, 12:55 am



gsjackson
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Post by gsjackson » May 12th, 2012, 1:36 pm

Well, nobody can ever accuse you of not planning things out ahead of time. You'll definitely put Mr. Lennon's theory to a test -- life is what happens when we're making other plans. Hope much of it works out, including that listing and selling real estate part -- no given these days. I just managed to sell a condo in Tucson after listing it three different times. Lost only $21K on it -- a small victory since I think prices have even further to drop, given the backlog of foreclosures the banks have been sitting on.

That Paraguay passport is very interesting. Are you saying it gets you into the Schengen Zone in Europe, for how long? I believe most of the country is god-awful hot and humid, but four months may be doable. Would really like to piggy-back on to your research here.

And Armenia has just gone on to my list.

Jester
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Post by Jester » May 13th, 2012, 6:52 am

gsjackson wrote:Well, nobody can ever accuse you of not planning things out ahead of time. You'll definitely put Mr. Lennon's theory to a test -- life is what happens when we're making other plans.
LOL {ouch} - yes I am guilty of being an overplanner/perfectionist. Usually works out great if (and only if) there is some urgency to do it all fast. That's why I like real estate deals. Planning + pressure = excitement and victory. Been missing the stress.

And in general if I DON'T plan my life... I find others do it for me. Inertia sucks.
gsjackson wrote: Hope much of it works out, including that listing and selling real estate part -- no given these days. I just managed to sell a condo in Tucson after listing it three different times. Lost only $21K on it -- a small victory since I think prices have even further to drop, given the backlog of foreclosures the banks have been sitting on.
I agree on prices, more shit could happen. Agents are creeping back into the business (like me) - which will increase number of transactions, not necessarily prices. Seems like rental units in non-rent-controlled areas in my part of Los Angeles should do well if inflation accelerates down the road. People always need a place to live. Rents have quit dropping since folks have moved in with each other etc. -- but landlords can't raise rents now because all the tenants are broke.

Btw - MY listings sell the first time around! The basics are always said to be "location, location, location." But you can't move the property! So to me the basics are "promote, promote, promote".
Got to hit it hard up front.
gsjackson wrote: That Paraguay passport is very interesting. Are you saying it gets you into the Schengen Zone in Europe, for how long?
Schengen is the same for almost all I think. (New Zealanders may get a special deal, I forget.) You get three months in Europe, then have to spend three months outside, then repeat. You can spend the off-months in non-Schengen countries of course, in Britain or Ireland or Balkans or Cyprus etc..

My point is that some of the easy-residency, easy-passport countries, like Belize and Dominican Republic, are not great passports for a traveler or PT. For example you must apply for visas in advance at a consulate to go to the EU. I don't know how hard that is.

But anyway I use the EU (Schengen) countries as a measure of passport's usefulness. Even if you don't get Visa-Free or VOA into the EU, it doesn't mean you're stuck and can't travel on a whim. Some SEA passports work well within SEA, and LA passports seem to work well in LA. But if you are ok to go to EU without visa in advance, then probably you get into other ritzy places too, like Japan.

Most Latin American countries are visa-free or visa-on-arrival to the EU. Exceptions, where you WOULD need to apply for visa to visit EU, would include holders of passports from Ecuador, Peru, Colombia. Probably an anti-drug-smuggling thing I guess.

Because of Schengen, a perpetual tourist lifestyle with visa runs wouldn't work well in Europe like it can in Latin America or Thailand. You would need an actual resident visa to live there. Germany is good for that, already discussed by Peter Nolan on another thread of mine. Montenegro is okay also, and low-tax. Portugal is now IMO the best opening in Europe. Tax-free for 10 years, easy residency, don't have to buy real estate (as you would in say Malta). And Portugal includes Madeira plus the Azores in the Atlantic Ocean. Interesting way into the Schengen Zone!
gsjackson wrote:I believe most of the country is god-awful hot and humid, but four months may be doable.
I once saw a website that had its own "comfort index" based on humidity and high temperature during the summer months. Kind of like a "chill factor", but for heat. I guess you could call it a "sweat factor". Never found that website again. Would love to find it again. Everyone says it's "really hot" in Paraguay, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Panama, Singapore - or wherever - but you only get temperatures. They'll say omigod it hits 40 degrees celsius. Here in California that's bearable if you don't go hiking at noon. But it's dry here. I know the places mentioned will be godawful sweaty sometimes but I would like to be able to compare or rank the misery - so I know which godawful tropical hellhole is LESS miserable...

Re 4 months a year - yes - obviously a fellow with a Mercosur passport could divide the other 8 months a year between Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Brazil, visa-free.

Jester
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Re: Staying Put! :shock:

Post by Jester » May 13th, 2012, 7:00 am

Jester wrote: ******
OK, that’s the plan. ....

Thoughts?

-Jester
Don't be shy folks. I posted this under Questions and Advice. So please let me have your thoughts. If you detect a problem with my plan, or even suspect one, or if you see a better way, or want to "call bullshit" - fire away!

gsjackson
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Post by gsjackson » May 13th, 2012, 8:18 am

Jester wrote:
gsjackson wrote:I believe most of the country is god-awful hot and humid, but four months may be doable.
I once saw a website that had its own "comfort index" based on humidity and high temperature during the summer months. Kind of like a "chill factor", but for heat. I guess you could call it a "sweat factor". Never found that website again. Would love to find it again. Everyone says it's "really hot" in Paraguay, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Panama, Singapore - or wherever - but you only get temperatures. They'll say omigod it hits 40 degrees celsius. Here in California that's bearable if you don't go hiking at noon. But it's dry here. I know the places mentioned will be godawful sweaty sometimes but I would like to be able to compare or rank the misery - so I know which godawful tropical hellhole is LESS miserable...

Re 4 months a year - yes - obviously a fellow with a Mercosur passport could divide the other 8 months a year between Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Brazil, visa-free.
I was just thinking of Asuncion actually -- since I'd want to go to the most cosmopolitan city in a country like Paraguay -- and I checked the climate numbers there a couple of months ago. Very hot and very humid, all year. Apparently it's dryer in the western part of the country.

But the easiest way into Europe permanently is my objective, and it doesn't sound like the L.A. passports are any better than the US for that purpose. Now you've got me definitely interested in Portugal.

Your plan sounds fine, BTW. California does have the world's best climate and beautiful country. The culture is a human wasteland, but if you build your own little tightly held Armenian sanctuary it might work. Tightly held is key, though. Just look at the Kardashian gals to get some idea of how bad it can get if they're overexposed to the local toxicity.

Jester
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Post by Jester » May 13th, 2012, 9:10 am

gsjackson wrote: I was just thinking of Asuncion actually -- since I'd want to go to the most cosmopolitan city in a country like Paraguay
LOL exactly
gsjackson wrote: -- and I checked the climate numbers there a couple of months ago. Very hot and very humid, all year. Apparently it's dryer in the western part of the country.
if you ever run across a good website for year-round or summer-long heat and humidity in multiple countries -- please post!
gsjackson wrote: But the easiest way into Europe permanently is my objective, and it doesn't sound like the L.A. passports are any better than the US for that purpose. Now you've got me definitely interested in Portugal.
This website is oriented toward Hong Kongers who were using Portugal as a backup passport a few years back. I think it recommends buying a $100,000 or so rental property (updated price), establishing residency, learning language, then citizenship easy.

here is the site:
http://www.marktier.com/2ndpassport/cha ... Page=09-02

But I think the new law (2010 or so) allows residency without real estate, just based on being self-supporting, like Germany, Mexico, etc. - actual law doesn't seem available in English. Same law offers the 10 year tax holiday I believe.

Btw folks from Portugese speaking countries have a faster track, but I don't know whether it's worth a detour. Apparently you get Brazil residency with $50000 or so in real estate.
gsjackson wrote: Your plan sounds fine, BTW. California does have the world's best climate and beautiful country. The culture is a human wasteland, but if you build your own little tightly held Armenian sanctuary it might work. Tightly held is key, though.Just look at the Kardashian gals to get some idea of how bad it can get if they're overexposed to the local toxicity.
You said it.

And I really do appreciate the input. Good to hear the affirming words. I feel like the last normal man on earth sometimes. Like the Chuck Heston movie - Omega Man. :roll:

djfourmoney
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Post by djfourmoney » May 13th, 2012, 9:42 am

The only thing I will say is that Taxes shouldn't be looked at as a bad thing.

Its how Governments function and while we are going through a historical financial/social disaster, its about getting benefits in exchange for paying taxes.

The BRICS nations are experiencing almost double digit growth but still have internal problems with poverty. The least of these is likely Brazil since it really doing something about its poverty and hasn't been captured by US interest. Its seeing tremendous investment from Germany.

Germany controlling the debt crisis keeps the crisis from coming home to roost and that makes it a logical landing point if your considering relocation. Latin America offers very affordable living if you don't mind the lack of infrastructure outside of the major cities.

In a recent episode of House Hunters: International there was a couple from Florida. This White Woman's husband is Colombian and wanted to go back to his country. Specific reasons beyond the usually getting back to my roots were not given.

Anyway I bought a clapped out two story ranch style home in the rural area near one of the bigger cities (I forgot which one) for $30,000 US.

That leaves plenty of budget to build the house into what they want and they car close to nature.

Just like I often bring up, you can get affordable beach front property in Mexico at about the 1/4 of the cost of beach front property in much of Southern California and still be only 30-35 mins from the boarder with a Sentry Card (very little to no wait at all).

Work options still exist in America but when we plan to have our first child, I will likely relocate at that time.

gsjackson
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Post by gsjackson » May 13th, 2012, 5:10 pm

Jester wrote: if you ever run across a good website for year-round or summer-long heat and humidity in multiple countries -- please post!
For most cities of any size the Wickipedia article will have a month-by-month climate chart. To get an idea about humidity, just look at the average low for the month, and check how high it is. In humid climates the low at night does not drop too far below the high. Anything above 65 for an average low, and certainly above 70, it's getting pretty uncomfortable, at least for me. Not a concern in most of Europe, except for the odd heat wave, but very much so in Latin America and Asia, and, of course, the US.

Jester
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Post by Jester » May 21st, 2012, 8:40 am

djfourmoney wrote:The only thing I will say is that Taxes shouldn't be looked at as a bad thing.

Its how Governments function and while we are going through a historical financial/social disaster, its about getting benefits in exchange for paying taxes.

The BRICS nations are experiencing almost double digit growth but still have internal problems with poverty. The least of these is likely Brazil since it really doing something about its poverty and hasn't been captured by US interest. Its seeing tremendous investment from Germany.

Germany controlling the debt crisis keeps the crisis from coming home to roost and that makes it a logical landing point if your considering relocation. Latin America offers very affordable living if you don't mind the lack of infrastructure outside of the major cities.

In a recent episode of House Hunters: International there was a couple from Florida. This White Woman's husband is Colombian and wanted to go back to his country. Specific reasons beyond the usually getting back to my roots were not given.

Anyway I bought a clapped out two story ranch style home in the rural area near one of the bigger cities (I forgot which one) for $30,000 US.

That leaves plenty of budget to build the house into what they want and they car close to nature.

Just like I often bring up, you can get affordable beach front property in Mexico at about the 1/4 of the cost of beach front property in much of Southern California and still be only 30-35 mins from the boarder with a Sentry Card (very little to no wait at all).

Work options still exist in America but when we plan to have our first child, I will likely relocate at that time.
Don't mind taxes, I mind reporting. I prefer VAT and sales tax, so I never have to fle income tax.

Also I don't want to income tax or social security tax on internet income, if I'm living in a country that won't let me work there or start a business there. If I make money there from the locals, I'll pay tax there. A lot of "better" countries tax worldwide income, I don't see doing this if they are not giving me full citizenship.

BRICs probably won't work for me, though I admire them. Brazil has those radiation scanners at airports, I am just not gonna subject self and loved ones to blatant irradiation. Insult is on top of injury. Would like to visit via ferry from Uruguay.

I do appreciate that you keep pointing out positive options, like BRICs, Mexico, Germany etc.

Way to be!

Like you I guess I see Mexico as an easy first step for testing out foreign living, proximity, and good airline connections.

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