Join John Adams, world renowned Intl Matchmaker, Thurs nights 8:30 EST for Live Webcasts with FREE Prizes!
And check out Five Reasons why you should attend a FREE Live AFA Seminar! See locations and details.


Scam free! Check out Christian Filipina - Meet Asian women with Christian values! Members screened.
Exclusive book offer! 75% off! How to Meet, Date and Marry Your Filipina Wife



View Active Topics       Latest 100 Topics       View Your Posts       FAQ Topics       Switch to Mobile


Where to live for mixed race with $1000 income

Ask questions and get advice, or share advice. Disclaimer: Any advice you take here is at your own risk. We are not liable for any consequences you might incur from following someone's advice here.
Note: Before posting your question, do a search for it in the Google Search box at the top to see if it's already been addressed.

Moderators: jamesbond, fschmidt

Postby Dark_Sol » Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:01 pm

I researched Paraguay, seeing how they had low cost of living and that supposedly firearms is easy to acquire. I am a huge shooter, own a few firearms, from pistols to assault rifles. I can sell my weapons if it becomes a problem to transport them, but would like to start my collection again in the country I am going to live.
Dark_Sol
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:13 am
Location: Colorado







Postby Jester » Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:04 pm

Dark_Sol wrote:I researched Paraguay, seeing how they had low cost of living and that supposedly firearms is easy to acquire. I am a huge shooter, own a few firearms, from pistols to assault rifles. I can sell my weapons if it becomes a problem to transport them, but would like to start my collection again in the country I am going to live.


You can collect in virtually any Latin country, with permits, but I don't think you need a permit to buy in Paraguay or Bolivia.

Guatemala is pro-gun, but probably still need permits there. I think permit to buy also gives you concealed-carry there, not sure.

Anyway best place if you're pro-gun, anti-tax and don't need the ocean right outside, is Paraguay. No gangs, no Leftists, no personal income tax, easy residency.

See you there, maybe.
Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 7869
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Postby Dark_Sol » Wed Aug 22, 2012 1:02 am

Sold :twisted:
Dark_Sol
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:13 am
Location: Colorado

Postby Jackal » Wed Aug 22, 2012 2:58 am

You could probably go to Romania or Bulgaria also. Those countries are quite poor. Romanian is a bit related to Spanish so things might be a bit easier there (you'll recognize more words and they don't use cyrillic letters like they do in Bulgaria).

Romanian women are beautiful and the countryside is beautiful there, too. I personally don't like it there, but other people really like it, and I haven't been there many times.
Jackal
Experienced Poster
 
Posts: 1229
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:24 am
Location: Hungary

Postby Dark_Sol » Thu Aug 23, 2012 8:32 pm

I'll look into that, see if it's easy to acquire weapons and start a business.
Dark_Sol
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:13 am
Location: Colorado

Postby Rocky Top » Sat Aug 25, 2012 10:47 pm

Jester wrote:
publicduende wrote:
If you like hot weather all year round as I do and your plan is to work as a chef, places like Cartagena des Indias (Colombia) just seem perfect to me. They're not as sophisticated as Miami or Acapulco yet theyre booming and developing an international jet set mentality. This means more chic bars and restaurant to cater for the local and cosmopolitan rich, and more opportunities for a young talented chef to work, have a good life while furthering their career.

My wife's brother is a pro chef, he did a university degree in that and he's specialising in fish cuisine. Last time I heard from him he told me of Cartagena and Bogota the best locations for a budding chef.

Plus the big racial mix in the north Caribe will help making you feel at ease. Good luck!


+1
This is the absolutely the right answer.

If you hold a U.S. passport you can enter as a tourist and spend 3 months at a time, job-hunting in Colombia while living via the ATM from your U.S. account. Colombia is rising and big hotels etc. will snap you up with your gringo degree.

Once you locate a job there is massive paperwork, but you can get help. It won't be hard if you make some friends. Just let employer guide you through the process. They may introduce you to a "fixer" who has connections, who can walk the paperwork through, this is fine, like using a lawyer here. Your hands stay clean. Don't offer a bribe to Colombian immigration folks.

Basically Colombia just wants FirstWorld guys doing FirstWorld jobs to advance the country, not unskilled workers taking jobs from Colombians. The key here is that you are going to support the high-end tourist industry by preparing dishes that cater to international visitors. So the Yankee cooking school degree is the key.

Take all your papers including birth certificate, divorce decree (if any), child support up-to-date letter (if any), discharge papers, proof of disability payment (letter from VA. etc) and bank statements showing deposits, plus an FBI report showing your criminal record if any.

First step: A Colombian consulate (or embassy?) can advise you on the steps. Find out if the school certificate will qualify you for an employment visa (once you get hired of course). Also find out the exact paperwork required. Ask which documents will need translation and/or "apostille".

(Note: Make it clear you're not applying today for an employment visa, you're just going to visit as a tourist and look around first. If they are willing to hook you up with an employment visa right away, of course, take it, because it will save your employer paperwork and make you easier to hire.)

Second step: Go to a Live-Scan office (may be called something else outside California) to get fingerprinted, and order the FBI certificate to be mailed to a family address in states. Your family can send it to you down there later.

Third step: Buy a plane ticket, call your bank the day before you go and tell them where you'll be, fly to Colombia, look around, make friends, have fun.

Thank us later.


Seems like Jester has some experience with this. I would have thought that my electrical engineering degree would be of value in Colombia (else I would be there right now). But on my job searches for companies like GE, ABB, Areva, etc, I haven't found anything in my field (substations/power distribution).

I'm sure there have to be jobs down there or a big demand for those jobs, but I must be looking in the wrong places. I even searched around on the local Medellin power distributor webpage for some jobs.

Seems like the only thing they are looking for is IT related jobs.
Rocky Top
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:23 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby Jester » Sun Aug 26, 2012 12:23 am

Rocky Top wrote:
Jester wrote:If you hold a U.S. passport you can enter as a tourist and spend 3 months at a time, job-hunting in Colombia while living via the ATM from your U.S. account. Colombia is rising and big hotels etc. will snap you up with your gringo degree.

Once you locate a job there is massive paperwork, but you can get help. It won't be hard if you make some friends. Just let employer guide you through the process. They may introduce you to a "fixer" who has connections, who can walk the paperwork through, this is fine, like using a lawyer here. Your hands stay clean. Don't offer a bribe to Colombian immigration folks.

Basically Colombia just wants FirstWorld guys doing FirstWorld jobs to advance the country, not unskilled workers taking jobs from Colombians.


Seems like Jester has some experience with this. I would have thought that my electrical engineering degree would be of value in Colombia (else I would be there right now). But on my job searches for companies like GE, ABB, Areva, etc, I haven't found anything in my field (substations/power distribution).

I'm sure there have to be jobs down there or a big demand for those jobs, but I must be looking in the wrong places. I even searched around on the local Medellin power distributor webpage for some jobs.

Seems like the only thing they are looking for is IT related jobs.


Rocky Top if I had that degree I would go there in person on a student visa to learn Spanish or on a tourist visa, and look for work in person. I think Colombia is VERY much a who-you-know place, so making friends with someone at the right socioeconomic level who can introduce you would be important. A process, but doable for someone like you.

I do not think it would be overkill to do the following:
---Get letters of recommendation from professors or employers
---Take these with all paperwork I listed above to Colombian consulate, and ask them to translate, consularize, notarize, apostillize, blah blah

Then go down there on student or tourist visa (student if you need to aren't fluent) and start networking like mad with ambitious, accomplished people - people with money.

You would of course make more money in Asia, but if you want land, dogs, horses, salsa, cumbia, guns and all the rest, i.e. if you like Latin America over Asia, Colombia lifestyle will be tough to beat -- once you worm your way in.

Sao Paolo is going to work too, with higher salaries and much higher cost of living. Pick one or the other and go for it.

Other way is to get work with an international company in your field, and then down the road be open to international transfer.

PS The reasoning behind all the above is that Brazilians (for sure) and Colombians (I would guess) are open to hiring Yankees, but have no idea how to tell if someone is any good. I think (not sure) that they are probably used to hiring via "the grapevine", -- and you are not attached to that vine at present. So you pretty much have to package up the proof for them. E.g. if you're a Purdue graduate they may have never heard of Purdue, they might even need something that lists Purdue as one of America's top engineering schools...

I envy that degree... if you don't go abroad with it I will throw tomatoes!
Jester
Elite Upper Class Poster
 
Posts: 7869
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:10 am
Location: Chiang Mai Thailand

Postby publicduende » Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:14 am

Rocky Top wrote:
Jester wrote:
publicduende wrote:
If you like hot weather all year round as I do and your plan is to work as a chef, places like Cartagena des Indias (Colombia) just seem perfect to me. They're not as sophisticated as Miami or Acapulco yet theyre booming and developing an international jet set mentality. This means more chic bars and restaurant to cater for the local and cosmopolitan rich, and more opportunities for a young talented chef to work, have a good life while furthering their career.

My wife's brother is a pro chef, he did a university degree in that and he's specialising in fish cuisine. Last time I heard from him he told me of Cartagena and Bogota the best locations for a budding chef.

Plus the big racial mix in the north Caribe will help making you feel at ease. Good luck!


+1
This is the absolutely the right answer.

If you hold a U.S. passport you can enter as a tourist and spend 3 months at a time, job-hunting in Colombia while living via the ATM from your U.S. account. Colombia is rising and big hotels etc. will snap you up with your gringo degree.

Once you locate a job there is massive paperwork, but you can get help. It won't be hard if you make some friends. Just let employer guide you through the process. They may introduce you to a "fixer" who has connections, who can walk the paperwork through, this is fine, like using a lawyer here. Your hands stay clean. Don't offer a bribe to Colombian immigration folks.

Basically Colombia just wants FirstWorld guys doing FirstWorld jobs to advance the country, not unskilled workers taking jobs from Colombians. The key here is that you are going to support the high-end tourist industry by preparing dishes that cater to international visitors. So the Yankee cooking school degree is the key.

Take all your papers including birth certificate, divorce decree (if any), child support up-to-date letter (if any), discharge papers, proof of disability payment (letter from VA. etc) and bank statements showing deposits, plus an FBI report showing your criminal record if any.

First step: A Colombian consulate (or embassy?) can advise you on the steps. Find out if the school certificate will qualify you for an employment visa (once you get hired of course). Also find out the exact paperwork required. Ask which documents will need translation and/or "apostille".

(Note: Make it clear you're not applying today for an employment visa, you're just going to visit as a tourist and look around first. If they are willing to hook you up with an employment visa right away, of course, take it, because it will save your employer paperwork and make you easier to hire.)

Second step: Go to a Live-Scan office (may be called something else outside California) to get fingerprinted, and order the FBI certificate to be mailed to a family address in states. Your family can send it to you down there later.

Third step: Buy a plane ticket, call your bank the day before you go and tell them where you'll be, fly to Colombia, look around, make friends, have fun.

Thank us later.


Seems like Jester has some experience with this. I would have thought that my electrical engineering degree would be of value in Colombia (else I would be there right now). But on my job searches for companies like GE, ABB, Areva, etc, I haven't found anything in my field (substations/power distribution).

I'm sure there have to be jobs down there or a big demand for those jobs, but I must be looking in the wrong places. I even searched around on the local Medellin power distributor webpage for some jobs.

Seems like the only thing they are looking for is IT related jobs.


Oh that's interesting. Yes I have been (briefly) toying with the idea of working in Medellin and did find a few very reputable IT companies (the best one is www.pslcorp.com). My wife has a Mech Eng degree and used to work there as a production planner before moving to London. She's sleeping now, but if you're interested I will ask her about a few job boards for engineers and post the links here. One word of warning though: unless you have a commission-based job, one that involves significant responsibility, or uses skill rarely found in the local workforce (even interacting with a US customer could be one), salaries don't tend to be stellar. That doesn't mean you can't live comfortably and enjoy Medellin night and day, though :)
User avatar
publicduende
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2630
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:20 pm

Postby Rocky Top » Sun Aug 26, 2012 1:54 pm

publicduende wrote:
Rocky Top wrote:
Jester wrote:
publicduende wrote:
If you like hot weather all year round as I do and your plan is to work as a chef, places like Cartagena des Indias (Colombia) just seem perfect to me. They're not as sophisticated as Miami or Acapulco yet theyre booming and developing an international jet set mentality. This means more chic bars and restaurant to cater for the local and cosmopolitan rich, and more opportunities for a young talented chef to work, have a good life while furthering their career.

My wife's brother is a pro chef, he did a university degree in that and he's specialising in fish cuisine. Last time I heard from him he told me of Cartagena and Bogota the best locations for a budding chef.

Plus the big racial mix in the north Caribe will help making you feel at ease. Good luck!


+1
This is the absolutely the right answer.

If you hold a U.S. passport you can enter as a tourist and spend 3 months at a time, job-hunting in Colombia while living via the ATM from your U.S. account. Colombia is rising and big hotels etc. will snap you up with your gringo degree.

Once you locate a job there is massive paperwork, but you can get help. It won't be hard if you make some friends. Just let employer guide you through the process. They may introduce you to a "fixer" who has connections, who can walk the paperwork through, this is fine, like using a lawyer here. Your hands stay clean. Don't offer a bribe to Colombian immigration folks.

Basically Colombia just wants FirstWorld guys doing FirstWorld jobs to advance the country, not unskilled workers taking jobs from Colombians. The key here is that you are going to support the high-end tourist industry by preparing dishes that cater to international visitors. So the Yankee cooking school degree is the key.

Take all your papers including birth certificate, divorce decree (if any), child support up-to-date letter (if any), discharge papers, proof of disability payment (letter from VA. etc) and bank statements showing deposits, plus an FBI report showing your criminal record if any.

First step: A Colombian consulate (or embassy?) can advise you on the steps. Find out if the school certificate will qualify you for an employment visa (once you get hired of course). Also find out the exact paperwork required. Ask which documents will need translation and/or "apostille".

(Note: Make it clear you're not applying today for an employment visa, you're just going to visit as a tourist and look around first. If they are willing to hook you up with an employment visa right away, of course, take it, because it will save your employer paperwork and make you easier to hire.)

Second step: Go to a Live-Scan office (may be called something else outside California) to get fingerprinted, and order the FBI certificate to be mailed to a family address in states. Your family can send it to you down there later.

Third step: Buy a plane ticket, call your bank the day before you go and tell them where you'll be, fly to Colombia, look around, make friends, have fun.

Thank us later.


Seems like Jester has some experience with this. I would have thought that my electrical engineering degree would be of value in Colombia (else I would be there right now). But on my job searches for companies like GE, ABB, Areva, etc, I haven't found anything in my field (substations/power distribution).

I'm sure there have to be jobs down there or a big demand for those jobs, but I must be looking in the wrong places. I even searched around on the local Medellin power distributor webpage for some jobs.

Seems like the only thing they are looking for is IT related jobs.


Oh that's interesting. Yes I have been (briefly) toying with the idea of working in Medellin and did find a few very reputable IT companies (the best one is www.pslcorp.com). My wife has a Mech Eng degree and used to work there as a production planner before moving to London. She's sleeping now, but if you're interested I will ask her about a few job boards for engineers and post the links here. One word of warning though: unless you have a commission-based job, one that involves significant responsibility, or uses skill rarely found in the local workforce (even interacting with a US customer could be one), salaries don't tend to be stellar. That doesn't mean you can't live comfortably and enjoy Medellin night and day, though :)


When I was in Medellin last spring (2011), Hewlett-Packard was building some monstrosity down there that seemed to take up an entire city block near the aquarium & botanical garden. Seems like Medellin is heavily geared towards IT. The other big jobs I found were in the oil & gas business.
Rocky Top
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:23 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby Rocky Top » Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:01 pm

Oh, just one more thing.

Just from what I've seen online, it appears that Cartagena is bit more expensive than Medellin. I'm basing that on some of the rental properties I've seen posted online. I realize that on the coast that you will probably be paying a premium... I understand that aspect. But That is something I have been considering.

But everything is all relative. Cartagena compared to Medellin is more expensive. Cartagena compared to your typical Southeastern US city or mid-sized Midwestern city... about on par. So if I compared the two, I could maintain my present standard of living (assuming I could earn close to what I make here) in Cartagena or I could stay here in The Matrix for that price.

Not really much of a choice if you put a gun to my head.
Rocky Top
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:23 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby publicduende » Sun Aug 26, 2012 3:08 pm

Rocky Top wrote:When I was in Medellin last spring (2011), Hewlett-Packard was building some monstrosity down there that seemed to take up an entire city block near the aquarium & botanical garden. Seems like Medellin is heavily geared towards IT. The other big jobs I found were in the oil & gas business.


Yes, I heard about HP setting up their Latin American headquarters in Medellin. Not bad, considering that Medellin has the best technical universities in the country (eg. http://www.eafit.edu.co and http://www.upb.edu.co). It definitely looks like the workforce development agenda is more geared towards "nearsourcing" IT services. Good engineers are always welcome though. Monica just told me she used to look for opportunities on http://www.monster.com.co/, although some of the jobs are not publicly advertised and are for grabs if you know people who knows...you know what I mean.

Another thing you may have to be aware of. In Medellin, the working day starts at 7:30 AM, 8 at the latest, and ends at 5:30 or 6 PM. That might suck, especially for lazy arses like it me. In fact, Medellin is such a warm and sunny city and you'll always be waking up in a pleasant sunshine, and that helps a lot, compared to London at least :) The standard working week is 48 hours and the standard holiday entitlement is 15 days. Perhaps on a par with the US market, yet far from the European 38/40 hours and up to 25 days off.

Oil and gas rigs are not too bad a workplace, they too have power infrastructures to maintain. The southern district of Itagui still has a few manufacturing plants, they used to be more but some of them got shut down and moved elsewhere in the country, where it's cheaper.

Cartagena is probably a more pleasantly exotic place to live, but the job prospects in engineering and IT are far bleaker. It's all about tourism services and estates.
User avatar
publicduende
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2630
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:20 pm

Postby Rocky Top » Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:13 pm

publicduende wrote:
Rocky Top wrote:Oil and gas rigs are not too bad a workplace, they too have power infrastructures to maintain. The southern district of Itagui still has a few manufacturing plants, they used to be more but some of them got shut down and moved elsewhere in the country, where it's cheaper.


Oh, don't get it twisted... I have no issues with working in the field for oil/gas projects. That would be pretty similar to what I do now, and actually, closer to what I would be looking for.

I don't have a desire to work an office job. Field work is right up my alley.
Rocky Top
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 231
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 3:23 pm
Location: Tennessee

Postby Dark_Sol » Tue Aug 28, 2012 12:34 am

How does Bulgaria and Romania sound? Maybe even the Stan lands?
Dark_Sol
Freshman Poster
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:13 am
Location: Colorado

Postby publicduende » Tue Aug 28, 2012 12:49 am

Rocky Top wrote:
publicduende wrote:
Rocky Top wrote:Oil and gas rigs are not too bad a workplace, they too have power infrastructures to maintain. The southern district of Itagui still has a few manufacturing plants, they used to be more but some of them got shut down and moved elsewhere in the country, where it's cheaper.


Oh, don't get it twisted... I have no issues with working in the field for oil/gas projects. That would be pretty similar to what I do now, and actually, closer to what I would be looking for.

I don't have a desire to work an office job. Field work is right up my alley.


Found ths website. http://www.opcionempleo.com.co/
User avatar
publicduende
Veteran Poster
 
Posts: 2630
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:20 pm

Re: Where to live for mixed race with $1000 income

Postby polya » Fri Sep 14, 2012 5:47 am

Dark_Sol wrote:Title says it all, I get an income for $1000 for disability from the military for life. No college degree, but going to school for culinary. Plan to save the additional +$2000 from my gibill to move and invest. Which country can I live comfortably with $1000 a month. I am already living alright with this in the US.


What country have you decided to go to dark_sol? Let us know as I like to hear how things turn out when guys ask for advice on here.
"Woman is a violent and uncontrolled animal... If you allow them to achieve complete equality with men, do you think they will be easier to live with? Not at all. Once they have achieved equality, they will be your masters." Cato the Elder
polya
Junior Poster
 
Posts: 850
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:21 am

PreviousNext

Return to Questions and Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests