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Having Hard Time With Anti-Gun Laws in Most Parts

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Having Hard Time With Anti-Gun Laws in Most Parts

Postby zacb » Fri Apr 19, 2013 12:45 am

Hello,

I am having a hard time with gun registration in most countries. How can I trust these btards that they won't confiscate guns? I just want to be able to defend myself against thugs. Any advice?
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Re: Having Hard Time With Anti-Gun Laws in Most Parts

Postby momopi » Fri Apr 19, 2013 8:13 pm

zacb wrote:Hello,
I am having a hard time with gun registration in most countries. How can I trust these btards that they won't confiscate guns? I just want to be able to defend myself against thugs. Any advice?



The gun rights lobby have long supported the right to bear arms AND not allowing convicted criminals to buy or own firearms. It'd be hypocritical to cry foul when law enforcement agencies start confiscating firearms from convicted felons. From a libertarian perspective, instead of asking "should you be allowed", ask "should your rights and freedoms be taken". Should the rights and freedoms of a convicted bank robber to buy firearms and ammunition be taken away? Absolutely. Also, did anyone actually read the failed Manchin-Toomey amendment? It specifically forbades the government from creating a gun registry..

If you live in an anti-gun rights state, you need to accept the reality that 5.56 and 7.62 will be on top of the list to be banned in the future, versus .22, shotguns, and muzzle loaders will be on the bottom. At local Walmart here in Orange County, California, you can still find shelves piled high with shotgun ammo, but not certain other types for obvious reasons. You could get an AR-15 lower receiver made by local CNC shops, acquire all the parts and bury them in your backyard, but that would make it useless and out of reach, as you don't have time to dig it up, assemble, and load it when someone is breaking into your home now. Like it or not, an inexpensive, legally registered shotgun with plenty of ammo from local stores is the better option. Japan has very strict gun ownership laws and even they allow citizens to own shotguns and buy shotgun ammo.

One option to stay under the radar is to look into black powder firearms, which are not classified as modern firearms (as long as the lower receiver is not used in modern firearm or modern design). These are often cash and carry, even in California. You can get a cartridge conversion cylinder for black powder revolvers and use modern ammo. But if you want to look into this, you need to do some serious research on the types that are safe for conversion, as well as lower power ammunition. Using high power ammo on brass frame may result in you going to the hospital in a very bad way.

For those on a budget, do consider that for the price of an AR style rifle, you can buy a nice shotgun from local sporting store plus 12 months worth of emergency food and water storage. A nice rifle with a $2,000 scope is nice to look at, but you can't eat it if you're hungry. If you're buying a gun for emergencies, such as natural or man made disasters where utilities and local market supply chain is disrupted for weeks or even months, having a gun to defend your home with no food and water in the house would be stupid. There will be no food on the supermarket shelves to buy, and no water from your tap. These days even Walmart is selling emergency food buckets, but take note that the 20 year shelf life is 60F storage temperature, at 70F it's reduced to 10 years, and at 80F probably 3-5 years. Those pouches in the bucket are good to keep with a backpack at your work and car -- what counts is you can reach it when you need it. For home it's better to buy the #10 cans with 25 year shelf life that keeps better. Don't forget to store water. It irks me whenever I see a natural disaster and everyone have their hands out expecting the overwhelmed emergency response teams to feed them. As responsible citizens we should all keep at least 30 days of emergency food, water, medicine, portable toilet with lots of plastic bags, and enough firepower to defend ourselves until the situation is over.
Last edited by momopi on Fri Apr 19, 2013 9:24 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby zacb » Fri Apr 19, 2013 9:21 pm

Hmmm, interesting. Do you need to register shotguns in most countries? That is my biggest concern. I may not like gun control, but I would be able to live with shot guns.
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Postby momopi » Fri Apr 19, 2013 9:49 pm

zacb wrote:Hmmm, interesting. Do you need to register shotguns in most countries? That is my biggest concern. I may not like gun control, but I would be able to live with shot guns.


You'd find that in most countries that allow private ownership of firearms, registration and citizenship in good standing are required. Your first hurdle is getting the citizenship. You should also be aware that in more restrictive countries, firearm ownership is permitted for sports and hunting only, and self-defense is not accepted as a valid reason. Therefore if you used a gun to defend yourself, it's up to the prosecutor to decide if you'd be charged for unlawful use of a firearm.

Some places, such as Taiwan, allow private ownership of firearms for indigenous tribesmen only. This means even if you somehow obtained citizenship, you wouldn't be allowed to own firearms. For Taiwanese native tribesmen, they're allowed to own a certain number of hunting weapons per household, but both firearms and ammunition must be registered. Many tribals make their own unregistered ammunition, which is technically illegal, but law enforcement tend to look the other way unless if some incident occurs.

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