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Advice for those still in the US

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Advice for those still in the US

Postby AnonymousAmerican » Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:21 am

after seeing the questions of mr.darcy, I was inspired to make this thread. this thread goes to all the men still living in the US, figuring out how to escape this prison. I'll give you recommendations based off what I have seen in other people.

First, realize this, we don't live in the 1950s anymore, where heterosexual average american men were highly valued in the US and were viewed as clear winners in everything, and the losers were thugs and parasites who lived off everybody else. now, that's turned around, as average heterosexual american men are the new niggers/bums/untouchables who are despised by everybody and even despise each other. also, realize that you're a third-class citizen, having less rights than women (most especially attractive women), rich and powerful men, and queers.

second, you must realize that in the US, to get a woman that has this caliber in looks:

Image

you must be this:

Image

this:

Image

or this:

Image

otherwise, you must accept and fight over girls with other average guys that have the looks of this caliber:

Image

now to surviving in the US of saudi arabia:

1. pretend you accept the dogma of the decadent culture of the US:

you resist the flow, your whole life can be ruined in many ways (losing your job, being blackmarked to any future good job, being ostracized, etc). you give two faces so that you can be released from the prison that's the US on good behavior (if you have a criminal record, you can be barred from emigrating to another country or even to visit sometimes).

2. Save your money by not going out to bars/clubs:

Bars/clubs in the US are just places where women go to get attention validation in person and shoot down any guy who dares to make a move on them. many of you know that. add to that, places like those are big rip-offs as they charge ridiculous prices for drinks. you might as well stay at home and have a beer at home while watching educational videos on youtube, reading a book, or even sleeping early (becoming well-rested to have a good day).

3. don't try to get romantically involved with american women.

There is far too many risks and too little benefits getting romantically or trying to get involved with an american woman. it costs you too much broken hearts, too much headaches, and too much sad days to waste your time with them. You want to see your future with an american woman, watch the movie "American Beauty." that's your future with an american woman if you try to get involved with them.

4. workout, keep healthy:

don't have to explain much on that. it also keeps you busy.

5. save lots of money or re/train on a job that you can work abroad:

so you want to move abroad, how do expect to live? On Dirt? This should be one of the things you should plan on. talk to any of the prominent members on this forum (Ladislav, winston, etc) on tips to live abroad.

6. work your ass off:

connects to 5, and it keeps you busy.

7. don't listen to the bullshit of PUAs:

PUAs are like those shady get rich quick schemes. they promise big time results if you do certain things that don't even work or are too little benefit for too much work. only PUA that I have seen to give good information is rooshv, but that's because he also encourages to live abroad and his forum gives lots of good 411 on places to go and how to wisely spend your hard earned gold in those places of the world.

8. do your research:

plan where you want to go live/study abroad. each place has different cultures that cater to different people (ex: some people might like more Brazil than Mexico while some might like the Philippines more than Thailand. ladislav has covered that a bit).

9. take action.

don't just sit around, do what it takes to get your ass out of prison. you think those guys who escaped from Alcatraz just sat around and scratched their bellies? Hell no! They cunningly planned their escape plans and implemented their plans to make their escape attempt one of the most famous in the history of the USA. do your own escape from Alcatraz, unless you want to continue being a miserable slave to queers, feminists, and gorgon american women who only want you to overwork you till you die or are too old and weak to work.
A bartender told me this while I was in Guadalajara Mexico:

"If you aren't careful here with the women, you will be married in a week."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMNPv_HXffQ

how I live my life.

how to survive in the US: http://www.happierabroad.com/forum/view ... hp?t=19236
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Postby Jester » Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:51 am

Sticky this!
"Pick a point and go to it."
-- Dr John Hunsucker, speaking about canoeing on Georgia's Lake Lanier, with its irregular shape, and 1000 miles of meandering shoreline
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Postby xiongmao » Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:32 am

Great post!

Well I did actually go abroad, not sure I'm happier here, but it's nice to do something a bit different with your life.

I'll second the not spending money thing. For 2-3 years I bought practically nothing except for food. The result was building up enough cash to survive in Asia for years.

While I'm here I still live the frugal life. You could make a massive list of all the things I don't have but I'm really enjoying the minimalist lifestyle.
In February 2013 I quit my boring job and now I'm Happier Abroad...
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Postby Repatriate » Thu Jun 27, 2013 4:03 pm

You left one thing out: Consider options for dual nationality. A second passport is really useful because there are many countries which have reciprocal visa agreements with the U.S. which is not always a good thing. U.S. passport holders are often charged more for visas (Brazil and China come to mind) plus there's certain countries you may never get to visit legally or without risk if you're an obvious U.S. citizen.

Once you establish yourself overseas it's better to slowly extricate yourself from the U.S. tax system. If you hit the jackpot and ever become really successful overseas you can then contemplate totally renouncing citizenship as some very wealthy individuals have done already.

Dual nationality is also very useful for owning property overseas. Even in developing world countries that passport can be invaluable especially if you want to buy a house in some place like Thailand or invest in a business or whatever. Try doing it as a non citizen and you'll likely lose your shirt.

As a U.S. citizen i've also considered finding a citizen of a E.U. country to do a passport swap. We "marry" there and I get citizenship in a E.U. country and I marry/register them in the U.S. so they can get U.S. citizenship. Of course that's very much in the grey area but it's doable :lol: and sure beats really marrying someone for a passport.
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Postby Repatriate » Thu Jun 27, 2013 4:41 pm

I also forgot to mention that having a U.S. passport means your privacy and travel is constantly being monitored. I'm not some paranoid conspiracy theorist but with the way the current homeland security laws are set up it's best to stay as far off the radar as possible. They can screw you for any number of reasons through extrajudicial means. Even if you're not doing anything illegal why risk having the government butt its nose into everything you do.
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Postby Rock » Thu Jun 27, 2013 4:45 pm

Repatriate wrote:You left one thing out: Consider options for dual nationality. A second passport is really useful because there are many countries which have reciprocal visa agreements with the U.S. which is not always a good thing. U.S. passport holders are often charged more for visas (Brazil and China come to mind) plus there's certain countries you may never get to visit legally or without risk if you're an obvious U.S. citizen.

Once you establish yourself overseas it's better to slowly extricate yourself from the U.S. tax system. If you hit the jackpot and ever become really successful overseas you can then contemplate totally renouncing citizenship as some very wealthy individuals have done already.

Dual nationality is also very useful for owning property overseas. Even in developing world countries that passport can be invaluable especially if you want to buy a house in some place like Thailand or invest in a business or whatever. Try doing it as a non citizen and you'll likely lose your shirt.

As a U.S. citizen i've also considered finding a citizen of a E.U. country to do a passport swap. We "marry" there and I get citizenship in a E.U. country and I marry/register them in the U.S. so they can get U.S. citizenship. Of course that's very much in the grey area but it's doable :lol: and sure beats really marrying someone for a passport.


Do u know which if any countries (not necessarily EU) offer fast (1-2 years or less) second citizenship tracks to American men who marry their nationals? Now even in DR, laws have been modified on this so it takes several years.

Keep in mind, if u renounce for tax reasons (never admit that tho or u might be denied a visa to return for visits), u need to be somewhat strategic about it. Cus after a certain income and/or net worth cut-off, you have to pay a nasty exit tax (basically all of your assets are marked to market and you pay a significant percentage of your calculated net worth). So if you are headed towards prosperity but not quite there yet, do the math and renounce before you get too close to avoid this type of asset confiscation. Also, you would only wanna renounce if u have a decent second passport for travel purposes. A passport from say Phils would make your life very difficult if u wanna travel outside of a handful of countries. OTH, Taiwan passport, believe it or not, is quite a respectable and convenient travel pass these days. But of course, certain western passports (not US) are overall the best.
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Postby Repatriate » Thu Jun 27, 2013 5:45 pm

Rock wrote:Do u know which if any countries (not necessarily EU) offer fast (1-2 years or less) second citizenship tracks to American men who marry their nationals? Now even in DR, laws have been modified on this so it takes several years.

I'm not sure as i'm still doing some research into this. I suspect a mainland E.U. country would be the best way to do this. Of course they probably have language proficiency and cultural knowledge requirements but those are small hurdles. The southern European (Spain, Portugal, Greece, etc..) group of countries looks interesting because they're economically distressed and i'm sure there are many people who wouldn't mind taking on a U.S. passport in return. Spain only requires 1 year of residency after marriage for citizenship.

Keep in mind, if u renounce for tax reasons (never admit that tho or u might be denied a visa to return for visits), u need to be somewhat strategic about it. Cus after a certain income and/or net worth cut-off, you have to pay a nasty exit tax (basically all of your assets are marked to market and you pay a significant percentage of your calculated net worth). So if you are headed towards prosperity but not quite there yet, do the math and renounce before you get too close to avoid this type of asset confiscation. Also, you would only wanna renounce if u have a decent second passport for travel purposes. A passport from say Phils would make your life very difficult if u wanna travel outside of a handful of countries. OTH, Taiwan passport, believe it or not, is quite a respectable and convenient travel pass these days. But of course, certain western passports (not US) are overall the best.

That would be a thing for sure if you started a business and were actively banking under your U.S. passport. This is where having a passport from a region like H.K. or Taiwan would be handy. They have better taxation laws and you can open up accounts under a non U.S. passport. E.U. countries have pretty steep taxes too but i'm sure there are many creative ways you can mix and match opening accounts in various countries to keep yourself from becoming too big of a financial target. In order to become a primo target for the IRS or homeland security I suspect that you have to be making really big waves. I'm guessing most of us will never get into the double digit millions much less billions level. A few million net worth business would certainly be small enough to keep under that financial radar.
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Postby aozora13 » Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:45 pm

Repatriate wrote:
Rock wrote:Do u know which if any countries (not necessarily EU) offer fast (1-2 years or less) second citizenship tracks to American men who marry their nationals? Now even in DR, laws have been modified on this so it takes several years.

I'm not sure as i'm still doing some research into this. I suspect a mainland E.U. country would be the best way to do this. Of course they probably have language proficiency and cultural knowledge requirements but those are small hurdles. The southern European (Spain, Portugal, Greece, etc..) group of countries looks interesting because they're economically distressed and i'm sure there are many people who wouldn't mind taking on a U.S. passport in return. Spain only requires 1 year of residency after marriage for citizenship.

Keep in mind, if u renounce for tax reasons (never admit that tho or u might be denied a visa to return for visits), u need to be somewhat strategic about it. Cus after a certain income and/or net worth cut-off, you have to pay a nasty exit tax (basically all of your assets are marked to market and you pay a significant percentage of your calculated net worth). So if you are headed towards prosperity but not quite there yet, do the math and renounce before you get too close to avoid this type of asset confiscation. Also, you would only wanna renounce if u have a decent second passport for travel purposes. A passport from say Phils would make your life very difficult if u wanna travel outside of a handful of countries. OTH, Taiwan passport, believe it or not, is quite a respectable and convenient travel pass these days. But of course, certain western passports (not US) are overall the best.

That would be a thing for sure if you started a business and were actively banking under your U.S. passport. This is where having a passport from a region like H.K. or Taiwan would be handy. They have better taxation laws and you can open up accounts under a non U.S. passport. E.U. countries have pretty steep taxes too but i'm sure there are many creative ways you can mix and match opening accounts in various countries to keep yourself from becoming too big of a financial target. In order to become a primo target for the IRS or homeland security I suspect that you have to be making really big waves. I'm guessing most of us will never get into the double digit millions much less billions level. A few million net worth business would certainly be small enough to keep under that financial radar.


Repatriate,

Thanks for the idea. I was wondering about this for years and thought the only way is to try to marry someone from Europe and then try to settle in a country that does not have high taxes. Possibly spread out your businesses. I am not sure why a person would be happy with a US Passport other than have about 150+ countries with Visa Free travel (tourism up to 90 days). I think though it has to be away to settle in a country as the only legal and logical way is to either teach English in a non-English country you like (low salary) or to possibly open a business up and/or if you are lucky to see if you are a candidate for an ancestry-link for a passport (as having a Irish grandparent to get a EU Passport, Italian, German or others that do have that plan setup).
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Postby gsjackson » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:37 pm

xiongmao wrote:Great post!

Well I did actually go abroad, not sure I'm happier here, but it's nice to do something a bit different with your life.

I'll second the not spending money thing. For 2-3 years I bought practically nothing except for food. The result was building up enough cash to survive in Asia for years.

While I'm here I still live the frugal life. You could make a massive list of all the things I don't have but I'm really enjoying the minimalist lifestyle.


I must have missed a few weeks of your posting around a month ago, xiongmao. Iirc, as recently as May you still found China very intriguing. You seem to have bailed now, holding your nose. What happened? Globetrotter/PHVisitor might have undergone a similar evolution of views about China, but it didn't get reported here. Do people taking dumps in public places and such finally just wear you down?
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Postby q7677 » Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:19 pm

xiongmao wrote:Great post!

Well I did actually go abroad, not sure I'm happier here, but it's nice to do something a bit different with your life.

I'll second the not spending money thing. For 2-3 years I bought practically nothing except for food. The result was building up enough cash to survive in Asia for years.

While I'm here I still live the frugal life. You could make a massive list of all the things I don't have but I'm really enjoying the minimalist lifestyle.


xiongmao, why do you say "not sure I'm happier here"? has the "women" problem improved?
If it did, do you feel like you've traded off something that you had in the US? I'm asking because I've had similar feelings when living outside the US: no problems with accessibility to women, but small things you get used to(safety, easy access to outdoors, business opportunities, service, etc) when being in the states are missing.
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Postby AnonymousAmerican » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:29 am

Repatriate wrote:You left one thing out: Consider options for dual nationality. A second passport is really useful because there are many countries which have reciprocal visa agreements with the U.S. which is not always a good thing. U.S. passport holders are often charged more for visas (Brazil and China come to mind) plus there's certain countries you may never get to visit legally or without risk if you're an obvious U.S. citizen.

Once you establish yourself overseas it's better to slowly extricate yourself from the U.S. tax system. If you hit the jackpot and ever become really successful overseas you can then contemplate totally renouncing citizenship as some very wealthy individuals have done already.

Dual nationality is also very useful for owning property overseas. Even in developing world countries that passport can be invaluable especially if you want to buy a house in some place like Thailand or invest in a business or whatever. Try doing it as a non citizen and you'll likely lose your shirt.

As a U.S. citizen i've also considered finding a citizen of a E.U. country to do a passport swap. We "marry" there and I get citizenship in a E.U. country and I marry/register them in the U.S. so they can get U.S. citizenship. Of course that's very much in the grey area but it's doable :lol: and sure beats really marrying someone for a passport.


what you said falls on the research area. but yeah, it's better to relinquish your american citizenship once you leave for good, since Uncle Sam will hunt you down for any sort of income when you're living and working abroad. I am thinking of going to spain, since I have mexican citizenship and all I need to do is live there for two years and I can get a spanish passport.
A bartender told me this while I was in Guadalajara Mexico:

"If you aren't careful here with the women, you will be married in a week."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMNPv_HXffQ

how I live my life.

how to survive in the US: http://www.happierabroad.com/forum/view ... hp?t=19236
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Postby AnonymousAmerican » Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:31 am

xiongmao wrote:Great post!

Well I did actually go abroad, not sure I'm happier here, but it's nice to do something a bit different with your life.

I'll second the not spending money thing. For 2-3 years I bought practically nothing except for food. The result was building up enough cash to survive in Asia for years.

While I'm here I still live the frugal life. You could make a massive list of all the things I don't have but I'm really enjoying the minimalist lifestyle.


it's better to live as a minimalist. what's the point of living with so much materials and things? nothing. just like the Tao has said, when you have more material, it only requires you to guard more your things, wasting precious time in the process, adding to the stress as well.
A bartender told me this while I was in Guadalajara Mexico:

"If you aren't careful here with the women, you will be married in a week."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMNPv_HXffQ

how I live my life.

how to survive in the US: http://www.happierabroad.com/forum/view ... hp?t=19236
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Postby Rock » Sat Jun 29, 2013 9:00 pm

Repatriate wrote:
Rock wrote:Do u know which if any countries (not necessarily EU) offer fast (1-2 years or less) second citizenship tracks to American men who marry their nationals? Now even in DR, laws have been modified on this so it takes several years.

I'm not sure as i'm still doing some research into this. I suspect a mainland E.U. country would be the best way to do this. Of course they probably have language proficiency and cultural knowledge requirements but those are small hurdles. The southern European (Spain, Portugal, Greece, etc..) group of countries looks interesting because they're economically distressed and i'm sure there are many people who wouldn't mind taking on a U.S. passport in return. Spain only requires 1 year of residency after marriage for citizenship.

Keep in mind, if u renounce for tax reasons (never admit that tho or u might be denied a visa to return for visits), u need to be somewhat strategic about it. Cus after a certain income and/or net worth cut-off, you have to pay a nasty exit tax (basically all of your assets are marked to market and you pay a significant percentage of your calculated net worth). So if you are headed towards prosperity but not quite there yet, do the math and renounce before you get too close to avoid this type of asset confiscation. Also, you would only wanna renounce if u have a decent second passport for travel purposes. A passport from say Phils would make your life very difficult if u wanna travel outside of a handful of countries. OTH, Taiwan passport, believe it or not, is quite a respectable and convenient travel pass these days. But of course, certain western passports (not US) are overall the best.

That would be a thing for sure if you started a business and were actively banking under your U.S. passport. This is where having a passport from a region like H.K. or Taiwan would be handy. They have better taxation laws and you can open up accounts under a non U.S. passport. E.U. countries have pretty steep taxes too but i'm sure there are many creative ways you can mix and match opening accounts in various countries to keep yourself from becoming too big of a financial target. In order to become a primo target for the IRS or homeland security I suspect that you have to be making really big waves. I'm guessing most of us will never get into the double digit millions much less billions level. A few million net worth business would certainly be small enough to keep under that financial radar.


I'm not sure you can really naturalize in Spain after just one year of married residency. I have a close Taiwan friend who married a Spanish guy in Barcelona more than 6 years ago, established residency there right away, and has been working legally there since. She told me she is qualified in theory to naturalize and has had her paperwork in some queue for like 2 or 3 years now but is still waiting. She has no idea when it will be approved and the government agencies she deals with won't give her definite answers. BTW, she studied the languages very hard and is now fluent in Spanish with an accent of course and has decent command of Catalin too; so language issues have not been much of a hindrance to her in the application process. She uses Spanish intensely everyday in her work.

In DR, I got the runaround too. And a new president and new set of laws mid-course messed everything up. Getting PR status is quite easy in many countries but it really doesn't protect you at all. But becoming an actual citizen by naturalization seems to be getting more and more challenging in many of the places where it used to be doable. Guys like you, Winston, Momopi, and Falcon are so lucky you can obtain Taiwan citizenship quickly and easily without having to first renounce you US citizenship.

As for US tax enforcement overseas, do not assume they only go after big fish. Sometimes the giants escape relatively unscathed while the small fries get burned. Just look at some of the details of the DOJ prosecution of UBS and its attack on thousands of its US clients who held funds with the bank in Switzerland. The first customer to get prosecuted, billionaire Igor Olenicoff got a slap on the wrist - small fine relative to size of accounts and no jail time. But many of the account holders who held funds of 500K to a few million got their accounts confiscated and had to serve jail time. There are even clients who had maximum balances of as low as just over 100k who ended up getting prosecuted criminally. The small guys lack the resources to put up a good fight. Defending yourself when the government sues you for an FBAR penalty can run in the 100s of thousands in some cases. And you've got to contend with the criminal side first if you really get unlucky.

Already, the government will block your passport application/renewal if you owe more than 2,500 in child support. It's not much of a stretch that they might also cancel an existing passport if someone at home like your baby mamma made some noise. Now consider the pieces being put into place for international tax enforcement of US persons with offshore accounts. FATCA is being rolled-out and will force overseas financial institutions to act as agencies of US tax system by automatically submitting relevant data to IRS each year on all US persons. Don't assume State Department won't at some stage cooperate with IRS as they already do with other government agencies in the case of unpaid child support.
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Postby Jester » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:38 am

Repatriate wrote:That would be a thing for sure if you started a business and were actively banking under your U.S. passport. This is where having a passport from a region like H.K. or Taiwan would be handy. They have better taxation laws and you can open up accounts under a non U.S. passport.


Tricky.

I believe that U.S. is demanding, under FATCA, that any country trading with our banks rat out not only U.S. depositors, but also foreign depositors who were born in the U.S.

I think the IRS is trying to target "accidental" U.S. citizens, who were raised overseas and may not know they are technically American.

But anyway the point is that - if the foreign bank is diligent they may send off a form to the U.S. informing the U.S. about your account with them - even if the account is opened with your second passport. How will they know you are U.S.-born? Your new passport will probably have that info on it (place of birth).

Sure, they may miss that info when opening the account, or they may neglect to include you on their FATCA report. But the simplest thing would be to put up with the nuisance of reporting assets to the U.S., until that glorious day when you renounce.
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Postby Why Not » Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:04 am

Newbie here...great post!!! Both humorous and insightful. Keep it coming :)
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