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Why I'm tired of living in Angeles City, where to move to?

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Re: Good News!

Postby pete98146 » Mon Jul 25, 2011 7:56 pm

Northamericanguy wrote:
Rock wrote:48.12 seconds for 400 meters puts you at something like top 0.01% to 0.001% of US males up to 30 or so. The fastest guy in my high school could never even break 50 seconds. How fast can you run it now?


^^ Yea, tell that to Nike or Adidas, 48.1 is SLOW to them (though good for a collage scholarship). You need to run about mid 45, for sure, 44 seconds to even think about getting a shoe contract and running at the big meets in Europe to make lottery type earnings.

Right now I can run the 400m around 50/51 seconds as I no longer train for the grueling 400m race. In preparation for the 100m/200m my morphology has completely changed as I have gained muscle mass and weight which is somewhat of a hindrance for a 400m sprint.



As far as what I run currently, I now train for the 100m/200m, and so far my training time for the 60m is 6.6 hand time. .24 needs to be added to get a FAT time. I have yet to record a 100m/200m this year as I have only been training. I'm hoping to run around 10.4/21.5 by the end of this year.



Rock wrote:A lot of the better distance runners I've seen tend to look a bit weak and gaunt unless they are very young. It seems that too much distance training doesn't just burn-off fat but also some lean body mass. So I don't think extreme distance running is a good way to train for fitness. And some serious weightlifters look distorted and unhealthy to me too. I would rather be built like an in-shape Thai kick-boxer - not too big or bulky but solid as granite.


I agree.


Those of us that are lucky enough to be good athletes IMO have a leg up when dealing with warm weather. It's a given that I'll retire in Asia and I too will have to fight the heat and humidy. However, I look forward to this challenge because nothing will get in the way of keeping fit.

If I can't find an air conditioned gym, then I'll wake up at the crack of dawn when it's cooler. I can think of dozens of activities that would keep me in shape such as martial arts, yoga, strength training, cycling, tennis, basketball, walking etc.

If you are not in optimal shape then yes the heat will make your life a living hell. So staying in shape will be priority number one and there will be no excuses tolerated. Every time I'd stay in BKK I'd wake up early and go walking for miles and miles. I can't think of a more concrete jungle than Sukhumvait
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Re: Good News!

Postby Winston » Mon Jul 25, 2011 8:05 pm

pete98146 wrote:Those of us that are lucky enough to be good athletes IMO have a leg up when dealing with warm weather. It's a given that I'll retire in Asia and I too will have to fight the heat and humidy. However, I look forward to this challenge because nothing will get in the way of keeping fit.

If I can't find an air conditioned gym, then I'll wake up at the crack of dawn when it's cooler. I can think of dozens of activities that would keep me in shape such as martial arts, yoga, strength training, cycling, tennis, basketball, walking etc.

If you are not in optimal shape then yes the heat will make your life a living hell. So staying in shape will be priority number one and there will be no excuses tolerated. Every time I'd stay in BKK I'd wake up early and go walking for miles and miles. I can't think of a more concrete jungle than Sukhumvait


Didn't you read what I posted about the danger of exercising in heat and humidity? Not even people in shape are exempt from it.

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/wheat1.htm

Heat, humidity add up to danger

The elderly and ill aren't the only people that heat kills. It also kills healthy young people, usually because they do not recognize the dangers of exercising in hot weather, especially hot, humid weather.
When heat and humidity combine to slow evaporation of sweat from the body, outdoor exercise becomes dangerous even for those in good shape.
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Re: Good News!

Postby NorthAmericanguy » Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:02 pm

pete98146 wrote:

Rock wrote:A lot of the better distance runners I've seen tend to look a bit weak and gaunt unless they are very young. It seems that too much distance training doesn't just burn-off fat but also some lean body mass. So I don't think extreme distance running is a good way to train for fitness. And some serious weightlifters look distorted and unhealthy to me too. I would rather be built like an in-shape Thai kick-boxer - not too big or bulky but solid as granite.


I agree.

I agree.
Last edited by NorthAmericanguy on Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Truthville » Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:34 pm

(Sigh)

Like a car wreck you just can't HELP but slow down and gawk at, I'm back.

I hope you all are doing well?

Winston?

You are absolutely right! Your poor health is really all about the horrid weather conditions in that place you live.

I talked to a friend of mine whom is a certified climate scientist, and he told me that, and I quote, "Hot, humid weather makes people fat, depressed, and lazy."

His advice? Go travel to somewhere like Siberia, where it's dry and cold. He told me it will take YEARS off your age, or was it is your life?

I then talked to a food scientist I found on Craig's List, and he told me that "Soy is nature's fountain of processed youth."

Seriously Winston?

Quit banning people like well-informed and Phoenix Sosa! They are a lot more entertaining than you are.

Remember Happier Abroadians. "You are free to disagree with the emperor, just don't you DARE tell him!"

Oh, and you like quotes Winston? He are some I found about Phoenix Sosa.

"Phoenix is the BEST free-lance writer on the "net" today! by Burt in Chicago
"Phoenix Sosa embodies the true spirit and character of the pissed-off American Male" by Kathy in New York'
"Phoenix tells it straight, with no chaser!" by Doug in Detroit.

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Postby odbo » Tue Jul 26, 2011 12:08 am

Winston wrote:Mr S, odbo,

I asked an expat I know in Palawan, who is one of the smartest guys I know with a laser-like mind, about the soy issue. Here is what he said:

There are many dairy-industry-funded special interest groups setting up "organizations" espousing the harmful effects of soy. I am sure there are also soy-industry-funded interest groups doing the opposite. I am not worried about it; I have been eating tons of it for decades, and my children since birth. I am still functioning at high mental levels, so are my children, and my son and I aren't growing breasts. Yes, we can look at the example of Asia eating tofu... but modern-day vegetarians in general consume far more.

Remember also that the chemicals in meat these days (hormones, antibiotics, growth-enhancers, etc. etc.) are far worse than anything Nature puts in soy!

So for me, I'll stop eating soy when I see myself getting stupid and growing breasts as they claim. One site even claims that the rise in homosexuality is 100% caused by soy. Idiots like that are scaring people for profit.

I got news for you. Both milk and soy (even all natural) are unhealthy for you. So the soy and milk lobbies don't have to lie or try very hard to make legitimate claims that the other is unhealthy. I got some more news for you. Not everything is about money. If a person cannot understand this they're not very smart regardless of how "laser-like" their mind is. A logical question to ask is why would people at the Federal Reserve who print the money need money?

If you can accept that, you're on your way to seeing what really runs the world. Our shit food is about eugenics, controlling society and shaping it how they see fit. Feminization of men, reduction of sperm count, reduction of IQ count, all effects of soy, and they've done a nice job flipping us from a testosterone driven species to an estrogen one.
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Postby Rock » Tue Jul 26, 2011 4:24 am

Winston wrote:
Rock wrote:1. I don't know who you talked to but 10-15 years ago, things were a lot different for an American. The guy with a bank account full of greenbacks felt like rich man overseas. In 2002, the US$ index hit its highest level since late 1980s. It has fallen 40% since then. In the late 90s, Asia suffered a financial crises which caused currencies in the region to collapse. The amount of Thai Baht a US$ could buy more than doubled in a short period of time. And local currency prices were a lot cheaper then too. From late 97 through 2002, Thailand was an extremely cheap place for Americans and it was clear to anyone who visited. In the late 90s, a US$ was worth more than one Euro and worth a lot more than a Swiss Franc, an Aussie dollar, or a Canadian dollar. Today, each of these currencies is worth more than a US$. Oh and don't forget Brazil. Back in 2003 when Lulu was elected, US$ shot up to nearly 4 Reals and local prices were a lot lower then too. Americans used to flock down there for cheap fun. Today, a US$ buys just 1.5 Reals and prices in larger Brazilian cities are on par with a European capital. In China, a US$ could exchange over 8 Renminbi until it was de-pegged in 2005. Today, a US$ gets just 6.5 Renminbi and local currency prices are much higher now.

If things keep going the way they have been for a few more years (I don't think they will unless powers that be in Washington decide to let dollar collapse), the US will become one of the world's cheap countries. If the debt ceiling issue doesn't get resolved in the next few days and we default on any of our treasury bonds, the dollar could face a new crisis.

2. How do you know I have no plans to go to Russia or any other parts of CIS? I've always acknowledged that girls in those areas on average outclassed women in most other parts of the world in terms of raw physical beauty and sex appeal. Asians, especially SE Asians, don't even come close. Anyway, I will research your cheap hotel options in Moscow. IF reasonable (quality and location) accommodation is that cheap, it certainly adds to the incentive to visit again.


Rock,
Even if all that is true, still, there are CHEAP ways to buy things that you need and get around. There are still choices. Prices may be higher but they still come in a wide range. You can still find cheaper ways of doing things. They are there if you look and shop around. That's common sense.

What I don't get is why you like to focus on the negative. It's like you are trying to focus on the glass being half empty and downplay things. Do you know that when you do that, you instill fear and doubt into others? Worrying is not a good thing. If you're going to talk about an obstacle, try to balance it out by talking about a solution or way of overcoming/dealing with it too. Do you understand what I mean?

Sure you can post high prices of things. But I can post low prices of things as well. Why not bring more balance to the picture? Otherwise you discourage people by always downplaying things. Are you aware of that?

For example, Moscow is rated as one of the most expensive cities in the world. Yet I can buy food and snacks from street vendors for really cheap, like 50 roubles or so. They are there, for tourists and local people. And the hostel I stayed at, Galina's Flat, is still very cheap, just as it was before.

So you see, there is still a vast price range of cheap prices and high prices. You can work around that. Why focus on the high prices and discourage others? Many expats like to do that for some reason. It's weird. I don't understand why expat guys have an instinctive desire to pump up numbers. I am glad that I'm not like that.

Anyway, if you have any other questions about Moscow or Russia, feel free to ask me or someone else here who is qualified.


1. I don't care how much shopping around you do. As an American, you cannot escape higher prices when foreign costs and/or currencies shoot-up in value relative to US$. The best you can do is go downmarket and cut things out - less comfortable or convenient accommodation, fewer dates, avoiding taxis, etc. I've eaten cheap street food before and saved a bit of money. But after just a few times, I got a nasty case of food poisoning and ended up spending a chunk of money in the hospital. The chances of getting items stolen goes up in very cheap hotels or hostels too. So going downmarket has its financial risks which you should factor in. And even the cheapest of cheap charlies from America who spend their whole vacations looking for the lowest cost way to do things will tell you they have to spend a lot more than they used to in a low-cost country like Thailand. Your brand of common sense sounds more like denial.

2. Winston, try to see the big picture for a change. For Americans, the Happier Abroad glass in not half empty now, more like three quarters empty as far as costs in most places are concerned. And a decade ago, it was three quarters full. You can call it negativity. But sometimes, the reality just happens to be negative. On the other hand, Australians, Swiss, and Japanese have benefited from a very strong local currencies so for them, costs overseas have gone up a lot less. And if things keep going in the current direction, they'll probably move into the US in bigger numbers to buy real estate and enjoy our cheap entertainment.

3. I don't pay much attention to the surveys which say such-and-such a city is the most expensive or least expensive. Those surveys are generally geared for multinational (MNC) corporate expats on a package. So it surveys the high-end, not budget end. For example, company expats on a package in Taipei may get a rent allowance of NT$100,000 or more to stay in some sort of serviced apartment. But rents at the comfortable budget end here are just a tiny fraction of that. Moscow may be expensive for MNC expats but perhaps not so much for regular leisure travelers. You find out true costs by traveling to a place, staying there for awhile, and learning the best ways to save money. The numbers I have cited, to the best of my knowledge, are not pumped-up.

4. I don't let worry get into my way as you can see from my travel track-record. That shoe fits you much better. Please don't preach what you don't practice! I'm not a whiner, complainer, or excuse maker. And I'm not here to blindly push the Happier Abroad lifestyle like some kind of fundamentalist religion if it means not telling the whole truth as I see it from my own experiences - both good and bad.

5. The financial side of long term travel is critical. To just gloss over it or make overly rosy assumptions is foolish in my view. If members understand that the world does not automatically become dirt cheap once they leave the US, they are more likely to make sound arrangements - online or on-the-ground teaching, online article writing, becoming fully qualified for a professional job in their target country, building-up sufficient savings for their trip, having a re-entry plan to make more money when their stash runs-out, etc. I will never forget some of the westerners I've seen in Asia and LatAm who ran out of money and resorted to begging. Its not a pretty sight.
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Postby OutWest » Tue Jul 26, 2011 5:07 am

Rock wrote:[quote

4. I don't let worry get into my way as you can see from my travel track-record. That shoe fits you much better. Please don't preach what you don't practice! I'm not a whiner, complainer, or excuse maker. And I'm not here to blindly push the Happier Abroad lifestyle like some kind of fundamentalist religion if it means not telling the whole truth as I see it from my own experiences - both good and bad.

5. The financial side of long term travel is critical. To just gloss over it or make overly rosy assumptions is foolish in my view. If members understand that the world does not automatically become dirt cheap once they leave the US, they are more likely to make sound arrangements - online or on-the-ground teaching, online article writing, becoming fully qualified for a professional job in their target country, building-up sufficient savings for their trip, having a re-entry plan to make more money when their stash runs-out, etc. I will never forget some of the westerners I've seen in Asia and LatAm who ran out of money and resorted to begging. Its not a pretty sight.


Rock-

You touch on some interesting and important points. When men have an unrealistic idea of expenses, they are setting themselves up for a real let-down.
There is also a second point you nearly got at- Being a traveler is not the same as being an expat. An expat lives in his host country, in time, often adopting it as his own. You correctly site the declining dollar as a hazard to dreams men may have of living overseas- but there is one way to help in that area, so long as you are an actual expat vs a traveler. You can participate in the local economy. This can index part of your income at least, to an appreciating local currency. That might be any number of activities, from tourism to raw products. I have seen this somewhat myself with the few hectares
of mango trees we have.

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Postby Rock » Tue Jul 26, 2011 5:59 am

OutWest wrote:
Rock wrote:[quote

4. I don't let worry get into my way as you can see from my travel track-record. That shoe fits you much better. Please don't preach what you don't practice! I'm not a whiner, complainer, or excuse maker. And I'm not here to blindly push the Happier Abroad lifestyle like some kind of fundamentalist religion if it means not telling the whole truth as I see it from my own experiences - both good and bad.

5. The financial side of long term travel is critical. To just gloss over it or make overly rosy assumptions is foolish in my view. If members understand that the world does not automatically become dirt cheap once they leave the US, they are more likely to make sound arrangements - online or on-the-ground teaching, online article writing, becoming fully qualified for a professional job in their target country, building-up sufficient savings for their trip, having a re-entry plan to make more money when their stash runs-out, etc. I will never forget some of the westerners I've seen in Asia and LatAm who ran out of money and resorted to begging. Its not a pretty sight.


Rock-

You touch on some interesting and important points. When men have an unrealistic idea of expenses, they are setting themselves up for a real let-down.
There is also a second point you nearly got at- Being a traveler is not the same as being an expat. An expat lives in his host country, in time, often adopting it as his own. You correctly site the declining dollar as a hazard to dreams men may have of living overseas- but there is one way to help in that area, so long as you are an actual expat vs a traveler. You can participate in the local economy. This can index part of your income at least, to an appreciating local currency. That might be any number of activities, from tourism to raw products. I have seen this somewhat myself with the few hectares
of mango trees we have.

outwest


Yes, one strategy is to survey the world as a traveler first, figure out what place you like best, then work towards becoming an expat there. Participating in local overseas economies is a way to reduce exposure to the ongoing economic demise of the US which I still hope will reverse (wishful thinking, huh?). I think there are good and bad ways to do this. Here's what I would avoid:

1. Buying land, a house or condo in the name of a local girlfriend.

2. Setting-up a business with a local partner or a local girlfriend or wife (very risky). Perhaps risks can be somewhat mitigated if you keep things in your name and just put locals on payroll or profit sharing.

3. Speculating in local stock markets as a trader unless you have already proven yourself in your home market with a strong long term track record.

4. Investing with unknown parties (often expats) who present seemingly sweet financial deals. Some Asian capitals still have boiler-rooms, often run from overseas.

Here's what I might consider:

1. Getting posted as an expat from a developed country to a lower income country (not easy but doable for a small subset of guys).

2. Buying land in an up-and-coming area in my own name (not many countries allow this though).

3. Investing in high-yielding condos in commercial centers or up-and-coming areas. SE Asia has a lot of decent yield opportunities, Latin America may be even better. In NE Asia, you won't get yield but compelling capital appreciation is a strong possibility as long as you invest in up-and-coming areas and avoid bubble periods.

4. Localizing to the extent that I could function as an effectively as an entrepreneur and then start my own business based on a niche where I found a promising opportunity (doable for certain types).

5. Getting hired locally at professional position in a rich place Singapore, Hong Kong (local economy moving away from US$ pegged HK$ towards offshore Renminbi as de-facto currency) or certain areas of Europe or Australia (doable for some with the right skills).

6. Getting hired locally at professional level an up-and-coming country like China (doable for many, especially Mandarin speakers).

7. Investing long-term in select local bonds or stocks, especially those with strong growth prospects or an attractive cash yield. Again, only in my own name.
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Cost comparison example

Postby Rock » Tue Jul 26, 2011 6:28 am

Over a decade ago, I lived in Hong Kong and found it quite cheap relative to the US for self-pay medical treatments of any kind. Now, the picture is no longer so clear.

Recently, I checked prices for bunion removal surgery from one of the leading specialists in Hong Kong and a leading specialist from the States (LA area). Here are the total costs of the surgery:

Hong Kong: 1 foot: HK$78,000 (US$10,012), 2 feet: HK$130,000 (US$16,688)

Los Angeles: 1 foot: US$6,000, 2 feet: US$12,000

Also, Bumrungrad Hospital in Bangkok is a world famous destination for medical tourism. Back in early 2000s, it was extremely cheap relative to costs in the US and developed Asia. Over the years, prices there have shot-up. Today, it still may be generally cheaper than the US for most things. But I've found its become more expensive than self pay rates for leading hospitals in Taipei (a developed city) for many types of critical operations (cancer surgeries, tumor removals, etc.). Simpler things also tend to be more expensive there. And I'm not sure it lives up to its reputation for quality. There seems to be more focus on the facilities and amenities (kinda like a little resort) and less on the actual quality of medical care. I know of expats who suffered botched procedures there and required secondary corrective treatments in other hospitals.
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Postby NorthAmericanguy » Tue Jul 26, 2011 9:48 am

Rock wrote:
Anyway, if you have any other questions about Moscow or Russia, feel free to ask me or someone else here who is qualified.


1. I don't care how much shopping around you do. As an American, you cannot escape higher prices when foreign costs and/or currencies shoot-up in value relative to US$. The best you can do is go downmarket and cut things out - less comfortable or convenient accommodation, fewer dates, avoiding taxis, etc. I've eaten cheap street food before and saved a bit of money. But after just a few times, I got a nasty case of food poisoning and ended up spending a chunk of money in the hospital. The chances of getting items stolen goes up in very cheap hotels or hostels too. So going downmarket has its financial risks which you should factor in. And even the cheapest of cheap charlies from America who spend their whole vacations looking for the lowest cost way to do things will tell you they have to spend a lot more than they used to in a low-cost country like Thailand. Your brand of common sense sounds more like denial.

2. Winston, try to see the big picture for a change. For Americans, the Happier Abroad glass in not half empty now, more like three quarters empty as far as costs in most places are concerned. And a decade ago, it was three quarters full. You can call it negativity. But sometimes, the reality just happens to be negative. On the other hand, Australians, Swiss, and Japanese have benefited from a very strong local currencies so for them, costs overseas have gone up a lot less. And if things keep going in the current direction, they'll probably move into the US in bigger numbers to buy real estate and enjoy our cheap entertainment.

3. I don't pay much attention to the surveys which say such-and-such a city is the most expensive or least expensive. Those surveys are generally geared for multinational (MNC) corporate expats on a package. So it surveys the high-end, not budget end. For example, company expats on a package in Taipei may get a rent allowance of NT$100,000 or more to stay in some sort of serviced apartment. But rents at the comfortable budget end here are just a tiny fraction of that. Moscow may be expensive for MNC expats but perhaps not so much for regular leisure travelers. You find out true costs by traveling to a place, staying there for awhile, and learning the best ways to save money. The numbers I have cited, to the best of my knowledge, are not pumped-up.

4. I don't let worry get into my way as you can see from my travel track-record. That shoe fits you much better. Please don't preach what you don't practice! I'm not a whiner, complainer, or excuse maker. And I'm not here to blindly push the Happier Abroad lifestyle like some kind of fundamentalist religion if it means not telling the whole truth as I see it from my own experiences - both good and bad.

5. The financial side of long term travel is critical. To just gloss over it or make overly rosy assumptions is foolish in my view. If members understand that the world does not automatically become dirt cheap once they leave the US, they are more likely to make sound arrangements - online or on-the-ground teaching, online article writing, becoming fully qualified for a professional job in their target country, building-up sufficient savings for their trip, having a re-entry plan to make more money when their stash runs-out, etc. I will never forget some of the westerners I've seen in Asia and LatAm who ran out of money and resorted to begging. Its not a pretty sight.[/quote]

+1
Last edited by NorthAmericanguy on Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby momopi » Wed Jul 27, 2011 1:12 am

Rock wrote:2. Buying land in an up-and-coming area in my own name (not many countries allow this though).

3. Investing in high-yielding condos in commercial centers or up-and-coming areas. SE Asia has a lot of decent yield opportunities, Latin America may be even better. In NE Asia, you won't get yield but compelling capital appreciation is a strong possibility as long as you invest in up-and-coming areas and avoid bubble periods.


I read that Mainland Chinese investors are now buying RE in TW, specifically Taichung area (or others that I'm unaware of).
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Postby momopi » Wed Jul 27, 2011 1:59 am

Winston wrote:
momopi wrote:If you're going to be a vegetarian, why eat all that fake meat stuff?


Because it's SOOOOOOOO delicious! Don't you know? It's like heaven in your mouth. And I grew up on them too. They are the most delicious things I've ever eaten!
Dude, have you tried the Morningstar veggie sausages or bacon strips? Or the Tofurky frankfurter hot dogs that come in many flavors? Or Boca Burgers? They taste healthy too. Maybe you should try them sometime to see what I mean. Nothing compares to them.

<snip>

Vegetarian chicken is very good for noodle soups. Very delicious. Momopi, haven't you ever tried my mom's cooking? If you did, you'd understand what I mean. All my friends said her vegetarian cooking is delicious and one of a kind.
If tempura is bad for you, then why is it a main part of Japanese cuisine? I only eat vegetable tempura occasionally.



The purpose of being a vegetarian is to not desire or eat meat products. Fake meat products are made to imitate the meat's texture and flavor, which conflicts with the goal of not desiring the consumption of meat. Quoting Gordon Ramsey, vegetarians should be good at cooking veggies. If I wanted a sausage, I'd eat a bratwurst and not some fake soy hotdog. If I wanted to eat tofu, I'd take a little trip to Meiji Tofu in Gardena and buy what they made in the morning (http://www.meijitofu.com/) and not some fake tofu burger from the supermarket frozen section.

The Japanese eat a variety of fried foods (tempura, katsu, croquette, tatsuda, furai, etc). But they don't eat them in as large of quantity or frequency as Americans do. East Asians are more likely to eat instant noodles as junk food.
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insane double standards against me

Postby Winston » Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:01 am

Have you all noticed, that those who accuse me of "being unable to take disagreement or constructive criticism" are usually THEMSELVES guilty of the same thing? It's like they are projecting their faults onto me or something. Obviously, they can dish it out, but they can't take it.

Then, even worse, after firing the first volley of attacks/insults at me, then they falsely claim that I started it! Are they blind to their own actions? Or deliberately lying and trying to frame me? Go figure. Either way, they are committing a crime when they do that. And with even more deception, they claim that their attacks/insults were nothing but "constructive criticism", which any bozo can do. Um, hello! I'm not stupid. I can tell the difference between constructive criticism and a mean spirited pointless attack/insult. Duh! Don't take me for a fool!

Anyone who knows me knows that I am FAIR. I return kindness with kindness, respect with respect, fire with fire. What is wrong with that? Well nothing. So these attackers make up false charges, since they have nothing on me, so they have to fabricate something. They've chosen to make me a target, and will lie to justify it. It's really sick and disgusting.

Plus, there is a huge double standard going on here. On the one hand, they are free to criticize me and I am obligated to take it and listen to it, without getting offended. But if I retaliate or disagree or criticize them, then they get all antsy and worked up and claim that I am starting a fight with them! Or they leave the forum. It's funny how HYPOCRITICAL people are isn't it? lol

I've noticed this with people on many forums and newsgroups, not just this one. People are allowed to diss me or criticize me, but I am not allowed to do the same back, instead, I am expected to take it all without offense! Nor am I allowed to disagree with anyone either! WTF?! It's like dealing with some hysterical mob whose Gospel belief is that "Anyone who attacks Winston must be right. But if Winston defends himself then he must be wrong!" What kind of ridiculous double standard is that? It sounds like pure bias to me. Oh the insanity of people: http://www.happierabroad.com/Quotes_Insanity.htm

Why does everyone think that they are a know it all who can dish criticism out, yet they are unable to take it themselves? People are so weird.

Have any of you had this experience where a friend or acquaintance suddenly attacks you, then when you argue back, they condemn you and say that you have a problem and blame you for it, yet this person was THE ONE who started it in the first place?! Then they say that you can't take criticism when the fact is that THEY can't take criticism either. Have any of you experienced this? I have, a number of times. It's so weird! Why do people do that? Do they not see the folly of what they're doing?

Could it be that when I complain about something, people start to see me as a punching bag for some reason? Is that why? Or does my dopey looking face look like a punching bag for macho guys who need to put someone below them on the pecking order?
Last edited by Winston on Thu Jul 28, 2011 5:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Winston » Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:09 am

Truthville wrote:(Sigh)

Like a car wreck you just can't HELP but slow down and gawk at, I'm back.

I hope you all are doing well?

Winston?

You are absolutely right! Your poor health is really all about the horrid weather conditions in that place you live.

I talked to a friend of mine whom is a certified climate scientist, and he told me that, and I quote, "Hot, humid weather makes people fat, depressed, and lazy."

His advice? Go travel to somewhere like Siberia, where it's dry and cold. He told me it will take YEARS off your age, or was it is your life?

I then talked to a food scientist I found on Craig's List, and he told me that "Soy is nature's fountain of processed youth."

Seriously Winston?

Quit banning people like well-informed and Phoenix Sosa! They are a lot more entertaining than you are.

Remember Happier Abroadians. "You are free to disagree with the emperor, just don't you DARE tell him!"

Oh, and you like quotes Winston? He are some I found about Phoenix Sosa.

"Phoenix is the BEST free-lance writer on the "net" today! by Burt in Chicago
"Phoenix Sosa embodies the true spirit and character of the pissed-off American Male" by Kathy in New York'
"Phoenix tells it straight, with no chaser!" by Doug in Detroit.

TruthVille


What a stupid post. There are no valid points in it. What a waste of space. Also, where did you get those quotes about Phoenix Sosa? Can you source them with URL's? If you made them up deliberately, then you are lying and fabricating on purpose, just to ridicule me, and that ought to warrant a ban.

So I should not ban people, even if they do a lot of wrong things and cross the line, just cause they are more entertaining than me? What kind of f***ed up logic is that? I run this forum with rationality and objectivity, not insanity like what your post exemplifies.
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Postby Truthville » Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:53 pm

Wow! Ever heard of the term "satire" oh' wise one?

Sure, sure ban everyone whom disagrees with your views. Now that is what I call "free-thinking!"

The fact is Winston, every time you post your personal life dribble, it's entertaining to me. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

The reason why people attack you, IMHO, is because you seriously have no clue on how to run your own life. Typical American behavior! Bitching/whining/pouting/running off at the mouth without EVER DOING ANYTHING ABOUT IT!

Oh woe is me! Oh PLEASE feel sorry for me! Oh please someone validate my life! Oh please tell me how "special" I am like mommy always did! PLEASE! PLEASE! PLEASE! Give me some attention! Gimme Gimme Gimme! I am the WU, looks upon my mighty works and despair.

The quotes about Phoenix? Ah, don't like them do you? Ha! Find the "URLs" yourself oh special one. Oh and so ANYTHING that takes the focus off you warrants a ban? Anyone whom MIGHT become more popular than you warrants a ban?

Winston quote "Why does everyone think that they are a know it all who can dish criticism out, yet they are unable to take it themselves? People are so weird." This describes YOU Winston. You see Winston, everyone, including you I know it's hard for you to fathom, is wrong at times. You cannot take criticism at all.

Here I'll take a page out of your "playbook" Please copy a post from this forum or any forum WHERE you admit you were wrong about something. Hell, I even settle for a post where you admit you don't know everything, agree with a poster whom contradicted you, or apologize for talking about something you know nothing about. Can you do it, or is it time for the ol' strawman to appear again?

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