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Hot Hungarian Women!

Discuss culture, living, traveling, relocating, dating or anything related to the European Countries.

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Hot Hungarian Women!

Postby Jackal » Thu Jun 11, 2009 8:49 pm

Hungarian women are some of the most beautiful women in the world. Hungarians are not Slavs. Some of them look like Brits or Germans. Others look more like Italians or Greeks.

Take a look for yourself.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29s6tBigSq0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTQe3EknncQ

Of course the girls in these videos are all models, but it gives you an idea how beautiful Hungarian women can be.
Last edited by Jackal on Fri Jun 12, 2009 8:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Mr S » Fri Jun 12, 2009 2:53 am

I don't know if you have specifically addressed this in another post but I was wondering why you chose Hungary to move to over any other European country. I've decided in the future to move from Asia to Europe once I feel the timing is right, which could be a few years from now. I haven't decided where to go specifically, but I'm open minded. I like to be somewhat stationary or have a semi-permanent living arrangement with flexible travel opportunities.

I'm going to focus on learning Russian at the moment as it provides a wider language avenue for communication within eastern Europe than other European languages in my opinion. I'm open to exploring a variety of countries but of course it's difficult to get a true sense of a country just be vacationing for a short time. I would say you need around six months to truly get a sense of a country and it culture and whether one is truly compatible living there.

I'm pretty comfortable knowing where I lie with Thailand, Korea and the Philippines as I have lived there for at least six months or longer. I could live in any of these countries for a long period of time, although Korea is probably one of the more difficult Asia countries to have to live in as a foreigner.
"The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane." Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor and stoic philosopher, 121-180 A.D.
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Postby Jackal » Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:28 pm

Mr S wrote:I don't know if you have specifically addressed this in another post but I was wondering why you chose Hungary to move to over any other European country. I've decided in the future to move from Asia to Europe once I feel the timing is right, which could be a few years from now. I haven't decided where to go specifically, but I'm open minded. I like to be somewhat stationary or have a semi-permanent living arrangement with flexible travel opportunities.

Well, I visited the Czech Republic for the summer several years ago and I really didn't feel comfortable with the people there and found that they were kind of stuck up and rude to me. I'm of Scandanavian descent, so I don't think that I mix with Slavs very well. I guess I assumed that the other Slavic Eastern European countries would just be very similar in feeling to the Czech Republic.

Also, Hungary and the Czech Republic are probably the most developed of the Eastern European countries, so Hungary was the other one to try. Hungary does indeed feel fairly civilized to me, except for the unfortunately common Eastern European experience of bathrooms being out of toilet paper (bring your own!). I just get along with the people here and they are friendly to me. I've met some French people who felt exactly the opposite way, and liked the Czech Republic better. It depends on your personality, I guess.

Mr S wrote:I'm going to focus on learning Russian at the moment as it provides a wider language avenue for communication within eastern Europe than other European languages in my opinion. I'm open to exploring a variety of countries but of course it's difficult to get a true sense of a country just be vacationing for a short time. I would say you need around six months to truly get a sense of a country and it culture and whether one is truly compatible living there.


Yes, Russian will help you with more Eastern European countries. Even Hungarian has borrowed some slavic words. However, many people in Hungary speak German (very few speak English), so that can be very helpful here if you know it. Yeah, six months is probably the true test; however, if you find you hate a country, one month would be sufficient to rule it out. In the Czech Republic, it took me about 2 weeks before I started to get really annoyed with the people. The last 2 weeks were very long indeed! The rumor is that the Slovakians are like the Czechs, but friendlier (of course, Hungarians would never say this because they have a very tense relationship with the Slovakians). I should go there sometime and find out.

I find that the service is much friendlier in Hungary than in the Czech Republic, although at times it can be very slow by American standards. Like most Europeans, Hungarians work to live and don't live to work (which I like).

When I'm more brave and experienced, I would like to visit some places in Asia, like India, Nepal, etc. But somehow I doubt I'd want to live in those places year-round.
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Postby Mr S » Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:21 am

I had some Slovakian friends when I was working in Korea and they were the coolest people to hang out with! Always joking around, very friendly, had your back at all times. They alway said I should visit their country if I ever get to Europe. I'm not joking when I had never met a better group of guys. They were working for some engineering company that sold machinery to some of the tech factories in Korea. So they just monitored and serviced them, making shit loads of money and not really doing much work wise. I believe they are still over there raking it in and living the good life in Korea. (Well if you can call it that, I suppose if you made shit loads of money and living expenses paid for you would just stay there too and save your money) I believe the told me at time they made around 5 million won a month. English teachers are lucky if they made 2 million. This was back on 04.

I guess when I have the funds I'll try to tour the various European countries and see which cultures best fit my personality. I know what you mean about getting a feel for a country. I once visited Cambodia for three weeks and by the last week I couldn't wait to leave! The people and culture just didn't jive with me, even though I lived the neighboring countries of Thailand and Vietnam, go figure...
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Postby Jackal » Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:16 pm

Mr S wrote:I guess when I have the funds I'll try to tour the various European countries and see which cultures best fit my personality. I know what you mean about getting a feel for a country. I once visited Cambodia for three weeks and by the last week I couldn't wait to leave! The people and culture just didn't jive with me, even though I lived the neighboring countries of Thailand and Vietnam, go figure...


You've lived in so many exotic Asian locations! You're frigging Indiana Jones! Did you ever get really sick while living in those countries (i.e. food poisoning, explosive diarrhea)?

Another thing to consider is that you should be sure to visit cities besides the capitals in the Eastern European countries you visit. Usually the capital feels very different than the rest of a country and has the most expats and tourists. Smaller cities and towns will give you an idea what a "typical" city in that country feels like. For example, Budapest has over two million people, but the second largest city in Hungary, Debrecen, has only 200,000 people, and all the other cities have even less.

Slovakia might be a good choice. I think it's doing better economically than most countries in the region and it's one of the few Eastern European countries that has the Euro. Romania seems like it might be cool, but the salaries are really, really low there. I've heard people say some good things about Poland, but I don't know. Croatia has a coastline which looks very similar to Greece. Slovenia might be okay too.
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Postby Mr S » Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:42 am

For those who have no interest in different kinds of shit, don't read this :shock:

Well one's shit changes depending on the country you're living in at the moment. Obviously the quality and types of water and food in each country has something to do with it. I've never gotten serious food poisoning because my body instantly realizes when I eat something bad and I pretty much eliminate it quite quickly. I've learned to bring tissue paper with me whenever I go anywhere cause you never know when it will hit and most toilets don't have any. I also keep pepto or immodium with me in case I need it. For some reason though they don't sell pepto here in th Philippines so I had to bring some over from the states.

I never got sick in Korea but my shit was like dog shit and green colored. I used to talk about that with the other guys at the bar sometimes cause other's noticed it as well. That's the kind of conversations you have in boring ass Korea!

Vietnam I never got seriously sick but the food makes you go a few times a day, and it's usually on the soft side. I think if your lived there for a few months your body would get used to it there, but only being there for a few weeks my stomach was still adjusting.

I was really careful in Cambodia cause sanitation is really bad there so I don't remember anything serious happening to me.

Thailand you got to be careful what you eat as it's more like a hit and run there. They don't have kitchens in most apartments or condos so you always have to eat out. This is why street food is so popular there and obviously you need to make sure you watch how the food is prepared if possible. Try not to eat food that has been lying out on a plate or open container. Watch them cook the food in from of you. Also that is one country you can't trust the ice in. Don't ever order ice there in your drinks if you have a weak stomach as you will probably get the runs or the very least runny stools.

Philippines I've had the normal issues I might other wise have living in the states as the types of food available are similar. I rarely eat street food here. If I've gotten the runs it was usually from some kind of food that I didn't cook well enough or was already bad. I've mostly gotten sick eating the pizza here sometimes. I think maybe cause the oven doesn't cook the ingredients well enough or some of the vegetables or meats aren't properly sanitized. Other than that I haven't had major issues, although I've had a few friends who have gotten food poisoning here and had to go to the hospital. I think my system moves too fast for any bacteria to get a strong foot hold on me. :lol:

It's kinda like a curse and good fortune at the same time. I rarely ever get seriously sick, but I will get serious runs for a bit if I do eat some bad food within 30-60 min after eating something.

Have you had any issues with bad food or food poisoning in parts of Europe?
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Postby Jackal » Sun Jun 14, 2009 9:14 pm

Well, that was quite informative, thanks. I guess the fact that I didn't want to deal with that kind of stuff is part of the reason I'm in Europe.

Mr S wrote:Have you had any issues with bad food or food poisoning in parts of Europe?


Not in Hungary, but once I ate a "hamburger" (which was pretty gross and actually made of ham or some imitation ham instead of ground beef) which I bought from a street vendor in Plzen, Czech Republic (the city where the Skoda car factory is and where Pilsener Urqell beer is made). I felt really strange and had an upset stomach for days afterwards.

Before I left the US to go to the Czech Republic, I got the first Hepatitis A vaccination (which gives partial protection; the second one is needed for full protection) because my doctor recommended it for travelling to Eastern Europe. She also said something about how she would never eat anything from a street vendor.

After I got sick from that hamburger, all I could think of was her words and was worried that my body was fighting off Hepatitis A. I'll never know for sure, but I'm glad I got the vaccination before I went, and I got better within a week.

I also ate some horrible pastries with plum filling in Prague which I bought from a local grocery store which did quite a number on my stomach.

I've eaten food from street vendors in Hungary many times without any problem. Things are generally pretty civilized here (except for the occasional absence of toilet paper, which I mentioned earlier).
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hungary

Postby have2fly » Thu Aug 05, 2010 8:50 pm

Jackal, thanks for answering to my PM. How is the cost of living compared to wages? Meaning, how much is enough to get by, go to movie once a month and do some dining a few times a week? Not fancy, some sandwich or kebab or shawarma would work. In France it's about 5-6 euros for Shawarma at some Middle eastern cafe on the street (but I am not in Paris).

Are the girls easily approachable? How do they react to foreigners?
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Postby Jackal » Thu Aug 05, 2010 10:38 pm

have2fly wrote:Jackal, thanks for answering to my PM.

No problem. I just thought it would be better to answer these things in public, so everyone can benefit from the info.

have2fly wrote:How is the cost of living compared to wages? Meaning, how much is enough to get by, go to movie once a month and do some dining a few times a week? Not fancy, some sandwich or kebab or shawarma would work. In France it's about 5-6 euros for Shawarma at some Middle eastern cafe on the street (but I am not in Paris).

Are the girls easily approachable? How do they react to foreigners?


The cost of living is generally cheap compared to western countries. I would say that you could get by spending about 200 USD a month on food if you mostly cook for yourself, but go out to eat occasionally. A full meal at an ordinary restaurant costs about 6 to 9 USD. A coffee at a cafe costs about 1 to 2 USD. A beer at a bar costs about 2 to 3 USD.

The exception is that DVDs, CDs, computers and other electronics probably cost about the same as they do in the US.

One ride on public transportation usually costs about 1.60 USD (less if you buy a book of 10 tickets or get a monthly pass). How much you will use public transportation depends on where you live.

Rental apartments in Budapest start at around 380 USD per month plus utilities. But rentals are obviously much cheaper outside of Budapest. I saw an ad for an apartment in Pécs (a small city) and the rent was only 100 USD per month--which included utilities! It seems that outside of Budapest, rent starts around 100 to 240 USD plus utilities. As soon as you get out of the capital, there are lots of good deals. Outside of Budapest, you could buy a simple house for about 15,000 USD or less!

Girls vary in temperment. Some are easy to approach and some are bitchy and stuck up. It also depends on the city and the region. People in smaller cities seem to be friendlier in my experience. People in the medium-sized cities seem to be less friendly. Budapest has a mix of everything.

Some girls are interested in foreigners and some are not. It varies. Hungarians are very used to meeting foreigners, so Americans aren't that much of a novelty, except in smaller cities and towns.

Here are some sites in English about Hungary (I don't read them much, so I don't know how good they are, but you can check them out):
http://www.budapestsun.com/
http://www.pestiside.hu/
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