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The productivity paradox

Discuss issues related to business, finance, taxes, investments, cost of living in different countries, etc.

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TheLight954
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Posts: 32
Joined: September 12th, 2016, 1:53 am

The productivity paradox

Post by TheLight954 » January 28th, 2018, 2:38 am

Here's something I don't get. How come our productivity is going up, at 3 times what it was in 1960, our technology is rapidly advancing, yet many people have to work even harder than before to make ends meet? It seems illogical to me.

This article seems interesting: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... or/241252/

If so, why can't we devote more productivity to necessities? Why make so much junk that we don't need?




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OutWest
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Posts: 2368
Joined: March 19th, 2011, 8:09 am
Location: Asia/USA

Re: The productivity paradox

Post by OutWest » January 28th, 2018, 3:20 am

TheLight954 wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 2:38 am
Here's something I don't get. How come our productivity is going up, at 3 times what it was in 1960, our technology is rapidly advancing, yet many people have to work even harder than before to make ends meet? It seems illogical to me.

This article seems interesting: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... or/241252/

If so, why can't we devote more productivity to necessities? Why make so much junk that we don't need?
It is not a matter of "feeling poor". Productivity is way up, but the share YOU get to keep has gone down.It is reality, not how you "Feel, as if it can somehow be explained away.

OutWest
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Posts: 2368
Joined: March 19th, 2011, 8:09 am
Location: Asia/USA

Re: The productivity paradox

Post by OutWest » January 28th, 2018, 3:20 am

TheLight954 wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 2:38 am
Here's something I don't get. How come our productivity is going up, at 3 times what it was in 1960, our technology is rapidly advancing, yet many people have to work even harder than before to make ends meet? It seems illogical to me.

This article seems interesting: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... or/241252/

If so, why can't we devote more productivity to necessities? Why make so much junk that we don't need?
It is not a matter of "feeling poor". Productivity is way up, but the share YOU get to keep has gone down.It is reality, not how you "Feel, as if it can somehow be explained away.

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Cornfed
Elite Upper Class Poster
Posts: 6246
Joined: August 17th, 2012, 5:22 am

Re: The productivity paradox

Post by Cornfed » January 28th, 2018, 3:31 am

It is quite simple. The elites, boomers, sluts, shitskins and other hideous tapeworm populations are increasingly screwing the productive or potentially productive white men population, and we need to deal with this problem by disposing of them.

TheLight954
Freshman Poster
Posts: 32
Joined: September 12th, 2016, 1:53 am

Re: The productivity paradox

Post by TheLight954 » January 28th, 2018, 4:12 am

OutWest wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 3:20 am
TheLight954 wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 2:38 am
Here's something I don't get. How come our productivity is going up, at 3 times what it was in 1960, our technology is rapidly advancing, yet many people have to work even harder than before to make ends meet? It seems illogical to me.

This article seems interesting: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... or/241252/

If so, why can't we devote more productivity to necessities? Why make so much junk that we don't need?
It is not a matter of "feeling poor". Productivity is way up, but the share YOU get to keep has gone down.It is reality, not how you "Feel, as if it can somehow be explained away.
I don't buy that. Most lower class people pay little to none in taxes. Yet they still can barely make ends meet, and that's with multiple jobs. (If you're talking about the fact that they already pay taxes to the business they're working for in the form of getting lower wages than the value of what they produce, then I guess it's a different story).

The idea that the government needs to subsidize the consumers(in this case, housing or healthcare) is misguided and only leads to a vicious inflatory cycle, as no amount of money subsidies can alleviate a shortage in goods. This is a fatal fallacy that most people, including policymakers, commit, where they focus on money itself as if it were a real entity rather than the product itself which is the real cause of the problem. What we need is to invest in housing, preferably in the form of higher buildings so we destroy as little of nature as possible. This would also help in some businesses where a big limiting factor is rent.

Productivity is way up, but in places where it doesn't matter.

OutWest
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Posts: 2368
Joined: March 19th, 2011, 8:09 am
Location: Asia/USA

Re: The productivity paradox

Post by OutWest » January 28th, 2018, 6:46 am

TheLight954 wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 4:12 am
OutWest wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 3:20 am
TheLight954 wrote:
January 28th, 2018, 2:38 am
Here's something I don't get. How come our productivity is going up, at 3 times what it was in 1960, our technology is rapidly advancing, yet many people have to work even harder than before to make ends meet? It seems illogical to me.

This article seems interesting: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/ar ... or/241252/

If so, why can't we devote more productivity to necessities? Why make so much junk that we don't need?
It is not a matter of "feeling poor". Productivity is way up, but the share YOU get to keep has gone down.It is reality, not how you "Feel, as if it can somehow be explained away.
I don't buy that. Most lower class people pay little to none in taxes. Yet they still can barely make ends meet, and that's with multiple jobs. (If you're talking about the fact that they already pay taxes to the business they're working for in the form of getting lower wages than the value of what they produce, then I guess it's a different story).

The idea that the government needs to subsidize the consumers(in this case, housing or healthcare) is misguided and only leads to a vicious inflatory cycle, as no amount of money subsidies can alleviate a shortage in goods. This is a fatal fallacy that most people, including policymakers, commit, where they focus on money itself as if it were a real entity rather than the product itself which is the real cause of the problem. What we need is to invest in housing, preferably in the form of higher buildings so we destroy as little of nature as possible. This would also help in some businesses where a big limiting factor is rent.

Productivity is way up, but in places where it doesn't matter.
I did not say anything about taxes. I am referring the the portion of their productivity they get to keep, their slice of the pie from their labors. Real wages adjusted for inflation are either stagnant, or in some jobs, reduced in inflation adjusted terms. The corporations that employ are hugely profitable and a smaller percentage of the pie goes to the employee. Of course, for many, the reduction in blue collar inflation adjusted wage corresponds quite nicely with legal and illegal immigration surges that started heavily about 1980. A good illustration of this might be the fact that around 1960, a corporate chief might only make about 20 times that of the average employee, whereas now it is hundreds of times or more in many cases. And a +1 on your comments as to the consequences of government subsidizing of consumers. The concern about the environment impact of an increasing population is best directed to the problem of population growth in a high consumption society where politicians engineer massive immigration both legal and illegal in order to create a future political power base and to provide their buddies ( Look at Tyson foods) lots of cheap migrant labor. The doubling of the US population in 50 years has had an exponentially greater impact on our environment than the token actions taken around the periphery.

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