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Rants and Raves - On Thai Women: It's Time to Smarten Up Men

Discuss culture, living, traveling, relocating, dating or anything related to the Asian countries - China, The Philippines, Thailand, etc.

Moderators: jamesbond, fschmidt

Postby RichieBoy » Mon Sep 09, 2013 5:55 am

The problem with Thai is many words sound the same for different things... so far I have heard 'Ma' means 'Come', 'Dog' and 'Horse', but its like BBK_Bro said, they initially sound the same to us Westerners but my partner explained its the tone... so one is said in a high pitched tone, one in a low tone etc.... I am actually getting an Ed Visa soon so I'll let you know how I get on.

I've already picked up a lot of Thai just from my partner and I think once I get into the groove I will be OK, but like BBK_bro said, time is better spent on conversational skills than Thai script.

In regards to Spanish I think Thai is easier for me because I can't roll my tongue like Spaniards lol
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Postby anamericaninbangkok » Mon Sep 09, 2013 6:50 am

bkk_bro wrote:
Ghost wrote:Yeah, I agree with your assessment also. I do want to visit Thailand for fun, and I'm in my mid-twenties. And likewise Philippines is my destination for a relationship. I'm assuming Thai is very similar or at least somewhat similar to Chinese. I find the four tones of Chinese difficult to produce consistently. Even so, I am making some headway on basic things. I just found aAiB's notion that Thai is easier to learn than Spanish to be odd. Spanish has the same essential alphabet with one or two added letters, is dead easy to pronounce even for beginners, and has tons of cognates with English. Thai has tones, a different alphabet, and probably no cognates with English. I'm not saying it is difficult - I don't know - but there's no way it's easier than a language like Spanish, for a native English speaker at least.


"I'm assuming Thai is very similar or at least somewhat similar to Chinese."

The tones are very similar between Thai and Mandarin. I'm learning Mandarin now and having learned Thai beforehand, it's put me much further ahead than someone starting from scratch at tonal languages. Thai is easier to learn than Mandarin as a whole, but for speaking purposes only, I don't think there's any difference in difficulty between the two. The grammar of both languages is quite simple and similar to each other in structure. Once you begin learning either language, their grammar system actually makes more sense. It's uncomplicated in comparison to English. They don't have all the verb tenses that English possesses. Which is why it's so difficult for them to grasp English.

The reason Thai is easier than Mandarin is obviously because they have an alphabet (Thai script) as opposed to thousands of characters. Personally though, I wouldn't spend valuable time learning to read either language as the reward versus time spent is peanuts compared to the practical value of speaking and listening. That being said, it's extremely helpful to learn the sounds of each Thai script character for pronunciation purposes when you learn to speak Thai (if you want to learn to hold a conversation, and not just tourist jargon). Reason being, there are a few different forms of transliteration used, and depending on which book you're using, it becomes confusing which sound you're expected to make. By knowing the sound of the script, there's no question, you will save a lot of time in the long run, and Thai's will understand you much better as you'll sound very clear. For Chinese, this isn't a problem, because Pinyin was created by the Chinese, and this is the system they use in school before they learn Characters. Pinyin is essentially the genuine Mandarin alphabet.

Initially when I began learning Thai, was learning to read also, but it's very time consuming and I felt my time was better spent learning conversation. However, by learning the characters, you will, after learning a few basic rules, be able to read Thai to some degree. If you stay in Thailand to work, it is worth learning that little bit as you'll be able to read a waitresses' name badge, know which toilet is the men's or women's, order from a menu, impress the ladies, show off to your friends, other than that, not much value haha.

Thai and Mandarin are definitely more difficult to learn than Spanish if you include reading and writing skills. But if you are only learning to listen and speak either language, and you've already overcome the hurdle of learning the tones and pronunciation (learning Thai script), then the playing field is leveled out. And this hurdle can be overcome in one month if you apply yourself.


If you're living or staying in Thailand long-term, worry more about the vocabulary than tones, and mimic the Thais when they say a phrase. You'll pick up the tones.

Also, since you're in Thailand, this will help a lot if you're willing to practice.
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Re: Rants and Raves - On Thai Women: It's Time to Smarten Up

Postby Voice of Reason » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:20 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:This is especially for the knuckleheads who think the bar girls are their future wives...


I never understand why someone would marry a bar whore.

It is almost as easy to meet women online who are looking for marriage.

Granted these women may have their own issues…they may have been knocked up, they are older and/or desperate, and they have trouble with Thai men, or they may - god forbid - be from Isaan.

But if someone is that desperate to get married in Thailand, surely the latter would be a better option?
Last edited by Voice of Reason on Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Voice of Reason » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:25 am

anamericaninbangkok wrote:
bkk_bro wrote:
Ghost wrote:Yeah, I agree with your assessment also. I do want to visit Thailand for fun, and I'm in my mid-twenties. And likewise Philippines is my destination for a relationship. I'm assuming Thai is very similar or at least somewhat similar to Chinese. I find the four tones of Chinese difficult to produce consistently. Even so, I am making some headway on basic things. I just found aAiB's notion that Thai is easier to learn than Spanish to be odd. Spanish has the same essential alphabet with one or two added letters, is dead easy to pronounce even for beginners, and has tons of cognates with English. Thai has tones, a different alphabet, and probably no cognates with English. I'm not saying it is difficult - I don't know - but there's no way it's easier than a language like Spanish, for a native English speaker at least.


"I'm assuming Thai is very similar or at least somewhat similar to Chinese."

The tones are very similar between Thai and Mandarin. I'm learning Mandarin now and having learned Thai beforehand, it's put me much further ahead than someone starting from scratch at tonal languages. Thai is easier to learn than Mandarin as a whole, but for speaking purposes only, I don't think there's any difference in difficulty between the two. The grammar of both languages is quite simple and similar to each other in structure. Once you begin learning either language, their grammar system actually makes more sense. It's uncomplicated in comparison to English. They don't have all the verb tenses that English possesses. Which is why it's so difficult for them to grasp English.

The reason Thai is easier than Mandarin is obviously because they have an alphabet (Thai script) as opposed to thousands of characters. Personally though, I wouldn't spend valuable time learning to read either language as the reward versus time spent is peanuts compared to the practical value of speaking and listening. That being said, it's extremely helpful to learn the sounds of each Thai script character for pronunciation purposes when you learn to speak Thai (if you want to learn to hold a conversation, and not just tourist jargon). Reason being, there are a few different forms of transliteration used, and depending on which book you're using, it becomes confusing which sound you're expected to make. By knowing the sound of the script, there's no question, you will save a lot of time in the long run, and Thai's will understand you much better as you'll sound very clear. For Chinese, this isn't a problem, because Pinyin was created by the Chinese, and this is the system they use in school before they learn Characters. Pinyin is essentially the genuine Mandarin alphabet.

Initially when I began learning Thai, was learning to read also, but it's very time consuming and I felt my time was better spent learning conversation. However, by learning the characters, you will, after learning a few basic rules, be able to read Thai to some degree. If you stay in Thailand to work, it is worth learning that little bit as you'll be able to read a waitresses' name badge, know which toilet is the men's or women's, order from a menu, impress the ladies, show off to your friends, other than that, not much value haha.

Thai and Mandarin are definitely more difficult to learn than Spanish if you include reading and writing skills. But if you are only learning to listen and speak either language, and you've already overcome the hurdle of learning the tones and pronunciation (learning Thai script), then the playing field is leveled out. And this hurdle can be overcome in one month if you apply yourself.


If you're living or staying in Thailand long-term, worry more about the vocabulary than tones, and mimic the Thais when they say a phrase. You'll pick up the tones.

Also, since you're in Thailand, this will help a lot if you're willing to practice.


I was in Thailand for almost a year, and I think I retarded my progress in the language by worrying too much about tones.

I find it much easier to learn a word by listening to a Thai person saying it. That seems to be the only way to learn a word...when I try to say words that I have just read while studying, they have no idea what I'm saying. But when I have heard a Thai person saying it, I can say it much easier without worrying about the tones.

One thing noticed was that people in Chiang Mai understood me better when I spoke Thai, whereas in Bangkok they didn't. In Chiang Mai many times I could just "say" the word and they could make it out, but in Bangkok I had to actually change my voice for them to understand me.
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