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Monopatriates, Bipatriates and Multipatriates

What's your story? Discussions your reasons for going abroad.

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Monopatriates, Bipatriates and Multipatriates

Postby ladislav » Fri Feb 20, 2009 4:05 pm

New Terms:

Monopatriate ( n.) A monopatriate person is someone who believes that everything (s)he needs can be found in one nation-state, usually, in the one in which he is a citizen/native/national and where he belongs to the predominant “power groupâ€￾ the groups of citizens who are enjoying a good lifestyle in which they do not lack for anything.

The term can also include minorities who still love the country of their birth/citizenship and who believe that through education or hard work they can achieve the same status as the power group.

Monopatriates can be indigenous or non indigenous people, native born or foreign born, immigrants or non-immigrants. As long as they embrace the idea that where they are in the best place on earth and do not aspire to seriously move to another country, they can be termed “monopatriateâ€￾.

In most first world as well as non first world large countries, the majority of people living there embrace the monopatriate philosophy.

Bipatriate (n.) this person believes that in order to have a complete life, one country is not enough- it is better to live in two countries. Usually these people are immigrants with still strong roots to the language and culture of the old country or cultural aficionados of exotic lands who early on in life start expressing a strong interest in some other culture. These persons shuttle back and forth, and forever live straddling two nations/cultures/states. Among them, you can also find people who are married to foreigners and who are now more or less connected to another ethnos or country through marriage. These are often bilingual and bicultural. Bipatriates include expat workers and even refugees. Bipatriism, thus, is not always a voluntary choice. Sometimes, it is taken up out of economic or political necessity.

Multipatriate (n) ( or if you wish, you can add such terms as “tri-, quadro-, quinto-“ patriates although anything beyond two is already a “multiâ€￾). These people believe that any one country is chronically incomplete for them and it lacks some important elements to enable them to enjoy a happy, full life there. Or, the country can have a fault which is seen as intolerable to them. They have travelled around the world and have discovered that in other countries there are elements that they seek which were missing at home and that there are no similar problems which they had to face in their permanent country of domicile. They also realize that just two countries is again not enough since usually there are too many problems and too many things are lacking for just one other country to make up for. Hence, they spread their lives among three or four countries or more, and live lives in which everything they need is available in abundance.

While bipatriation can be attained by quite a few people- look at Subcontinental workers in the Arabian Gulf countries who are there for decades, multipatriation is more difficult and requires greater flexibility as well as a good travel document ( such as a 1st world passport) which would (politically) not impede their freedom of movement. It is harder to be a multipatriate with a Bangladheshi passport.

A multipatriate should also have the sufficient financial means to afford such a lifestyle.It does not mean rich, just some $2000 a month could be enough. However, the rewards are enormous- the fulfilment of just about every desire can be his(hers). Big houses ( rented) at the fraction of a cost, gorgeous model-like lovers, past times that (s) he could never afford back home, the weather and the services, the views, the cultural environment, the friendliness that he could never hope to have in his/her country had he stayed mono-patriate.

Again and again you will discover that God has put everything you want on this planet and it is, in fact, the Garden of Eden. But God did not put all the treasures and fruit and pleasures of the Garden in just one Nation State. Even the richest people who think that everything is available where they are will see that while many things may be brought over, a lot of it is just not as good as it would be in its natural habitat.
Last edited by ladislav on Sun Mar 15, 2009 4:55 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby EvilBaga » Sun Mar 15, 2009 12:20 pm

Hehee...
As an ex-holder of a Bangladeshi passport, and soon (say about 2 more years) an income of 3-4K a month, you are absolutely right.

In the middle east, they actually have separate lines at the airport for people with western passports - and the holders of such passports are treated as human beings, the others as cattle (I grew up there, so I know).

Societies tend to enforce rules on its members due to politics and self preservation. Neither are necessarily conducive to freedom. For instance, with modern feminism, Western societies will try harder and harder to keep its high income earning/intellectually talented men at home, trapped to serve the needs of the female populace and of society in general.

The idea of giving these men their due will not occur to the bureaucracy at large. So, its best that these men shed their learned moralistic behaviors to do whats 'good' and simply follow their own desires and instincts. In other words, if you stab me in the back, don't expect the blood sweat and tears of my tax money.
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Postby EvilBaga » Sun Mar 15, 2009 12:23 pm

One thing about being a monopartriate, especially in the west - is you're never really 'rich'.

If you make a lot of money, well your wife could divorce you and run away with 75% of it, 50% outright, and another 25% from 10-15 years of "child support" payments. Thats something that has to be taken into account.

Unfortunately I have no idea what its like in other countries..
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Divorce

Postby Kris » Sun Mar 15, 2009 1:40 pm

If you make a lot of money, well your wife could divorce you and run away with 75% of it, 50% outright, and another 25% from 10-15 years of "child support" payments. Thats something that has to be taken into account.

Unfortunately I have no idea what its like in other countries..


That's what really worries me about marriage - the thought of losing my house, my pension and a large part of my income to some user who has just agrred to the marriage to get rich. I've seen it happen so many times to people at work.
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Postby EvilBaga » Sun Mar 15, 2009 4:00 pm

You should read the article I posted on why marriage has become a fraudulent contract
http://www.happierabroad.com/phpBB2/vie ... php?t=4959
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Postby ladislav » Sun Mar 15, 2009 4:45 pm

Hehee...
As an ex-holder of a Bangladeshi passport, and soon (say about 2 more years) an income of 3-4K a month, you are absolutely right.

In the middle east, they actually have separate lines at the airport for people with western passports - and the holders of such passports are treated as human beings, the others as cattle (I grew up there, so I know).



Oh I know what you are saying. I am in Riyadh now and I am an ex- not even a passport holder. I used to be stateless and could not go anywhere for a long time. When I got my US passport I still had no idea what it means outside of the US. My mother and I went traveling to Dubai and Oman and you just walk in. People smile at you. And you see these masses of Subcontinentals milling about and waiting for someone to deliver their visa. Then I was in Amsterdam, and well, they don't even stamp the passport- they say-" just go in". I had to ask them "please stamp my passport.I want a souvenir". Right next to me I saw some Eastern guy being dragged away- he tried to enter Europe. It could have been me had I not gone to the US way back when.

The Dutch airline personnel were amazed though upon seeing a Philippine- issued, US passport that had the word:" Ukraine" in it. They had not seen anything like that.
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Postby gmm567 » Sun Mar 15, 2009 6:13 pm

ladislav..you teach english in Saudia Arabia? I think remember that you work like half a the year and spend the rest of your time in the Philipines? So you make enough money to work only part of the year? What a life.

That's an amazing story , especially for someone who came from such a dysfuntional (communist), poor country such as the Ukraine.
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Postby ladislav » Mon Mar 16, 2009 2:55 am

gmm567 wrote:ladislav..you teach english in Saudia Arabia? I think remember that you work like half a the year and spend the rest of your time in the Philipines? So you make enough money to work only part of the year? What a life.

That's an amazing story , especially for someone who came from such a dysfuntional (communist), poor country such as the Ukraine.


It had taken me 20 years to get to that point. But hey, you can do the same if you get a TEFL certificate.

Now, it is not half a year although I could make it half a year if I wanted to but I am getting older so I want to have one year contracts, but there are some contracts that are two moths at a time. Some places in Lybia and the UAE are 6 weeks on, two weeks off with tickets paid.

Btw, in my times, Ukraine was not poor at all- I left in the 70ies- it was the richest republic then. And very functional and not as Communist as you may think-the people there are quite capitalistic, actually and all had their own country houses with gardens, etc. A gorgeous place in those times, but I could not buy my way out of the military service and had to split ( there are ways to do it).

Upon arrival in the US, I realized that I could never live the "girly" aspect of life as I used to, again. Lots of angry men, girls not looking at guys ( or me). So, where can I go to be my old self again? You got it! The Philippines!

Upon arriving there, I thought I was the only wacko that had had come such a long way until I learned that, well, I was not alone. There were other East Euros - sexual double- refugees there, all equipped with Canadian, US and Oz passports running around with cute 18 year olds and spending nights in girly bars. Guys from Bulgaria, Romania, Poland. The loneliness in the West drove them there( because they could not go back to mother countries then). I should probably make a post about that.
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Postby gmm567 » Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:28 am

Lots of angry men. You should tell me more. And yes, american women don't seem to make eye contact. They are very secretive about it. You have to have a friend look for you to see who is looking at you.
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Postby adam917 » Sat Mar 21, 2009 4:01 am

Isn't this called PT (Perpetual Tourist/Traveller)? (Making use of more than one country for your life as opposed to leaving all your eggs in one basket.)
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Postby ladislav » Sat Mar 21, 2009 1:32 pm

adam917 wrote:Isn't this called PT (Perpetual Tourist/Traveller)? (Making use of more than one country for your life as opposed to leaving all your eggs in one basket.)


Yes, it is almost the same thing except that PTs are usually into tax avoidance and are a political/legal concept; the ones I try and describe are more cultural philosophies and outlooks on life.
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