Join John Adams, world renowned Intl Matchmaker, Thurs nights 8:30 EST for Live Webcasts with FREE Prizes!
And Bud Patterson, author of Foreign Bride 101, Mon/Wed nights 9:30 EST for FREE Call-In Conferences.


Scam free! Christian Filipina - Meet Asian women with Christian values! All members screened.



View Active Topics       Latest 100 Topics       View Your Posts       FAQ Topics       Switch to Mobile


Asian American looking for EU citizenship

Ask questions and get advice, or share advice. Disclaimer: Any advice you take here is at your own risk. We are not liable for any consequences you might incur from following someone's advice here.
Note: Before posting your question, do a search for it in the Google Search box at the top to see if it's already been addressed.

Moderators: zboy1, fschmidt, jamesbond

Asian American looking for EU citizenship

Postby GFX » Tue Jul 20, 2010 11:51 pm

Hi there. I am an American citizen who happens to be Asian. I was wondering if anyone has done the opposite of bringing a European bride back to America? I was joking with a friend that I would be like a Russian bride, but looking for EU (Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) citizenship...

I am a fan of living in the European Union since there is Formula One racing in Europe and tons of automotive companies. Here in the U.S. the only flourishing automaker is Ford, and that's only because they are getting the EU versions over here.

If it is of any help I am turning 25 in September.
GFX
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:54 pm




Special Offer for HA Members! FREE 6 Month Membership on ForeignWomen.com! Sign up here.

Our Other Forums: Ladies Forum , Paranormal Forum

Follow Us

Postby Think Different » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:07 am

I've investigated this pretty thoroughly and the EU country with the shortest naturalization process is Belgium. If you have residency there it should take about 3-4 years (worth it). Most other EU countries take a minimum of 8 years, up to 12 years or more. Outside of the EU, Paraguay has a quick naturalization process and isn't a stickler for you maintaining continuous residency there. You can "buy" your citizenship in only 2 countries: St. Kitts and Nevis, and Republic of Dominica. I wouldn't recommend it however, since it costs around $100K, and there are companies that will screw you out of your money to "do the paperwork". If you want to spend a lot of money like that just marry an EU chick and pay up after you're divorced. At least you'll have the citizenship!
User avatar
Think Different
 
Posts: 906
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:28 am
Location: Germany

Postby GFX » Wed Jul 21, 2010 1:28 am

RedDog wrote:I've investigated this pretty thoroughly and the EU country with the shortest naturalization process is Belgium. If you have residency there it should take about 3-4 years (worth it). Most other EU countries take a minimum of 8 years, up to 12 years or more. Outside of the EU, Paraguay has a quick naturalization process and isn't a stickler for you maintaining continuous residency there. You can "buy" your citizenship in only 2 countries: St. Kitts and Nevis, and Republic of Dominica. I wouldn't recommend it however, since it costs around $100K, and there are companies that will screw you out of your money to "do the paperwork". If you want to spend a lot of money like that just marry an EU chick and pay up after you're divorced. At least you'll have the citizenship!


Was actually hoping to figure out how to meet a EU lady (not girl...) to get me out of this hell that is America. I mean most of the EU isn't overweight, boring (American females' mind is on gossip columns , mind numbing TV, and celebrities), and disgustingly stupid like American girls and I'm not obsessed with sex...unlike most males my age. From the international students I knew and people I have talked to online, Europeans seem more intelligent than your typical American. Character, sophistication, and intelligence are important to me. I am just not attracted to American women...

ESA (European space agency) would be a nice prospect and side endeavor. The economy is shit here and Obama is killing off the engineering fields (NASA is dying).

Is it easier to get a work visa for EU countries as an American? (I know Canada has a EU Agreement, or was that the European Economic Area?) Also, I might get another graduate degree in a EU country if the economy gets worse. What do you think?
GFX
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:54 pm

Postby Think Different » Wed Jul 21, 2010 1:44 am

Don't know if your question was directed at me, in particular, but as an American it is hard to get jobs in the EU. Preference is given to EU nations first. You may have to teach English in a non-English speaking EU country first for a year or so, until you've integrated into the society a bit and had a chance to meet the ladies. Marriage, if you're interested, is the easiest route, and short-cuts the nationalization process. Remember also that the former Eastern Bloc (CR, Poland, Baltic States, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, etc) are now also part of the EU, although they don't use the Euro. So, you may have better luck with the ladies in those countries, and they'd be open to the English teacher angle. In many, if not most Euro countries you can get university education for nearly free (just admin costs), but be advised that the courses will be in the native language. There are English-speaking specialty schools, but you'll pay a lot for those, as if you were in the US.
User avatar
Think Different
 
Posts: 906
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:28 am
Location: Germany

Postby MrPeabody » Wed Jul 21, 2010 3:46 am

If you get a job in the Netherlands under a high tech work visa, you can apply for Dutch citizenship after 5 years of living in the Netherlands. You can get the visa if you have some special technical skill that can’t be filled by a Dutch citizen.
MrPeabody
Frequent Poster
 
Posts: 1228
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2008 6:53 pm

Postby Rock » Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:45 am

RedDog wrote:I've investigated this pretty thoroughly and the EU country with the shortest naturalization process is Belgium. If you have residency there it should take about 3-4 years (worth it). Most other EU countries take a minimum of 8 years, up to 12 years or more. Outside of the EU, Paraguay has a quick naturalization process and isn't a stickler for you maintaining continuous residency there. You can "buy" your citizenship in only 2 countries: St. Kitts and Nevis, and Republic of Dominica. I wouldn't recommend it however, since it costs around $100K, and there are companies that will screw you out of your money to "do the paperwork". If you want to spend a lot of money like that just marry an EU chick and pay up after you're divorced. At least you'll have the citizenship!


I believe you can also "buy" citizenship in Guatemala and Dominican Republic for just a fraction of $100K. But it still takes a bit of time (6-18 months I believe) to complete the whole process.
Rock
Veteran Happier Abroader
 
Posts: 3263
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby Think Different » Wed Jul 21, 2010 5:54 am

According to this source, that has changed recently: http://www.qwealthreport.com/economic_citizenship.php

And here is more info about some good options in South America:

http://www.qwealthreport.com/blog/urugu ... passports/
http://www.qwealthreport.com/blog/urugu ... ts-part-2/
User avatar
Think Different
 
Posts: 906
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 4:28 am
Location: Germany

Postby GFX » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:54 pm

I did a bit of looking around for info about this topic previously but you forum-goers have really provided much insight.

I think the Belgium/Netherlands thing is nifty but in the long-term I would prbably be throwing away any semblance of a career. I looked at schools in Europe and it looks like Scandinavian countries have no tuition for masters'.

Europe in general
http://www.enjoy-europe.com/hte/chap22/moving.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration#Europe
http://europedating.expatica.com/ <-- surprising find on expatica...

Belgium
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2874.htm
http://www.associatedcontent.com/articl ... tml?cat=37
http://www.expatexchange.com/expat/inde ... id=3347725
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index ... 825AAXzmAZ <-- 17% unemployment...

Netherlands
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/3204.htm
http://www.gatewaysmoving.com/about_mov ... rlands.htm
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index ... 636AAMKZrc
http://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-2139.html

I think it is time to get cracking on the Dutch language. (I am fluent in English, had 6 years of Spanish; did a bit of German and Italian out of interest in motorsports.)

What about going into an international company and trying to transfer overseas? I am just flirting with the idea while I still can. Curiosity killed the cat, not the human beings. (Speaking of flirting, I find the Dutch accent kind of adorable actually. see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSsCcIDAiTI) Thanks for all the help thus far, by the way. :)
GFX
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:54 pm

Postby Winston » Wed Jul 21, 2010 1:56 pm

What if you marry a girl in the EU? Does that give you citizenship or a green card there?
Check out the latest posts in our blog The Happier Abroaders.

Don't forget my HA Grand Ebook and Dating Sites!

"It takes far less effort to find and move to the society that has what you want than it does to try to reconstruct an existing society to match your standards." - Harry Browne, How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World
User avatar
Winston
Site Admin
 
Posts: 18887
Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:16 pm

Postby GFX » Wed Jul 21, 2010 2:56 pm

Winston wrote:What if you marry a girl in the EU? Does that give you citizenship or a green card there?


"Myth: Marry a EU citizen and you will become a EU citizen.
People have old fashion TV based ideas. Marriage does not change your citizenship. It will allow you to get a visa easier to stay in the country which in term will allow you get get become citizen after many years and lot of paper." - http://claritaslux.com/blog/eu-citizenship/ , http://claritaslux.com/blog/citizenship-by-marriage/

Netherlands: Foreign spouses of Dutch nationals may apply for citizenship after three years of marriage, provided they are able to speak the Dutch language.
from http://www.immigrationcitizenship.eu/20 ... nship.html

France: If the couple has been living in France for a year, after a period of two year's marriage to a French citizen, it is possible to make a declaration of French citizenship by marriage. If the couple is living outside of France, a three year waiting period is required. In addition to the many documents required to prove both the applicants nationality and the spouse's french nationality, there is a requirement for competency in the French language. The declaration of citizenship is made by the couple to the local court, or the French consulate if overseas. The declaration is accepted or rejected by decision of the Ministry of Justice.

Italy: Person who marries an Italian national is eligible for citizenship unless person has been involved in any criminal proceeding.

Spain: Persons who were born in Spain, who have married a citizen of Spain, or who were born outside of Spain of a mother or father who was originally Spanish, need only reside one year.


Google Answers I found:
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=437984
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=409076

Norway, switzerland not part of EU... - http://www.euimmigration.org/

Schengen Visa means there is no need for individual visas. "The following 15 countries are currently active Schengen Visa members: Austria, Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxemburg, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands" - http://www.schengenvisa.cc/
but now there are 25 countries according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_area

Interesting: http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-wh ... dutch-wife

But in slang it means something totally wrong :(
"Dutch wife (plural Dutch wives)
1 A long body-length pillow that can be held or wrapped around one's body while sleeping.
2 In East Asia and Southeast Asia, a wicker or bamboo tube the size of a person for use in the bed. In the summer heat, the open bamboo structure is cooler than fabric pillows or sheets. The Dutch wife is embraced by the user- this position exposes the maximum amount of the body to cooling breezes.
3 A hoe.
4 A sex doll."
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Dutch_wife

Looking at top cities in the world:
http://www.mercer.com/qualityoflivingpr

What about Switzerland? There is conscription though. Germany has too.

So yeah...can't just marry and divorce
GFX
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:54 pm

Postby Rock » Thu Jul 22, 2010 5:01 am

RedDog wrote:According to this source, that has changed recently: http://www.qwealthreport.com/economic_citizenship.php

And here is more info about some good options in South America:

http://www.qwealthreport.com/blog/urugu ... passports/
http://www.qwealthreport.com/blog/urugu ... ts-part-2/


There's an Israeli lawyer based in Guatemala who still does Guatemala passports for Americans and others. Total cost is under $50,000 but its very fast.

Also, there is an American lawyer based in Dominican Republic who assists in application for Dominican Republic residency and naturalization. The total program takes around 18 months but costs under $20,000.

Both require that you visit the country in question for in-person interviews, etc., a clean Interpol record and for Dominican Republic, home government gets notified during application process which, for US citizens, sometimes triggers an IRS audit. Both programs allow you to maintain your previous nationality(ies).

I've spoken to both of these guys before. But I cannot vouch for either program. I don't know any customers from either one.

BTW, Taiwan passport and citizenship is also available to Americans and others. Here are the requirements:
1. Secure and maintain an Alien Resident Certificate and Work permit for 7 continuous years (5 continuous years if married to Taiwan national).
2. Be physically present in Taiwan for 183 days of each of these years.
3. After 1 and 2 have been satisfied, revoke your home country passport and citizenship at your embassy or de-facto embassy based in Taiwan.
4. If you are under a certain age (36 I believe) you will be required to put in nearly a year of military service.
5. There are a few more minor requirements that most people can probably satisfy quite easily.
Rock
Veteran Happier Abroader
 
Posts: 3263
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 4:16 pm

Postby adam917 » Thu Jul 22, 2010 8:41 pm

So basically it's 'Welcome to the 21st Century, where it is harder than ever to just up & move anywhere decent, that's if it's even possible.'

About Spain & a few other countries, can't one claim citizenship via ancestry within a certain number of generations?

GFX wrote:
Winston wrote:What if you marry a girl in the EU? Does that give you citizenship or a green card there?


"Myth: Marry a EU citizen and you will become a EU citizen.
People have old fashion TV based ideas. Marriage does not change your citizenship. It will allow you to get a visa easier to stay in the country which in term will allow you get get become citizen after many years and lot of paper." - http://claritaslux.com/blog/eu-citizenship/ , http://claritaslux.com/blog/citizenship-by-marriage/

Netherlands: Foreign spouses of Dutch nationals may apply for citizenship after three years of marriage, provided they are able to speak the Dutch language.
from http://www.immigrationcitizenship.eu/20 ... nship.html

France: If the couple has been living in France for a year, after a period of two year's marriage to a French citizen, it is possible to make a declaration of French citizenship by marriage. If the couple is living outside of France, a three year waiting period is required. In addition to the many documents required to prove both the applicants nationality and the spouse's french nationality, there is a requirement for competency in the French language. The declaration of citizenship is made by the couple to the local court, or the French consulate if overseas. The declaration is accepted or rejected by decision of the Ministry of Justice.

Italy: Person who marries an Italian national is eligible for citizenship unless person has been involved in any criminal proceeding.

Spain: Persons who were born in Spain, who have married a citizen of Spain, or who were born outside of Spain of a mother or father who was originally Spanish, need only reside one year.


Google Answers I found:
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=437984
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=409076

Norway, switzerland not part of EU... - http://www.euimmigration.org/

Schengen Visa means there is no need for individual visas. "The following 15 countries are currently active Schengen Visa members: Austria, Germany, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Luxemburg, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands" - http://www.schengenvisa.cc/
but now there are 25 countries according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_area

Interesting: http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-wh ... dutch-wife

But in slang it means something totally wrong :(
"Dutch wife (plural Dutch wives)
1 A long body-length pillow that can be held or wrapped around one's body while sleeping.
2 In East Asia and Southeast Asia, a wicker or bamboo tube the size of a person for use in the bed. In the summer heat, the open bamboo structure is cooler than fabric pillows or sheets. The Dutch wife is embraced by the user- this position exposes the maximum amount of the body to cooling breezes.
3 A hoe.
4 A sex doll."
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Dutch_wife

Looking at top cities in the world:
http://www.mercer.com/qualityoflivingpr

What about Switzerland? There is conscription though. Germany has too.

So yeah...can't just marry and divorce
User avatar
adam917
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Mon Sep 17, 2007 7:27 pm
Location: Earth


Return to Questions and Advice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests