Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

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Winston
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Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Winston »

Have any of you noticed this? When you see something you want at a store, and you buy it, then when you take it home you don't it anymore. Same goes for food at a grocery store. When you see it, you want it and it looks great and appealing. But when you get it, you suddenly don't feel like eating it that much. It happens to me all the time.

Why is that? Why is something more appealing and desirable if you don't have it than when you do?

Really weird isn't it? This would be a great question for Lavezzi.
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tre
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Post by tre »

My girlfriend (a Filipina) does this, but I do not understand it personally. I only purchase items I really want or need and rarely, if ever, have buyers remorse. Of course, we are talking about "items" and not women here. In the past, I've had women that I didn't want after I got them...lol.
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Post by Taco »

Lots of guys think there in love when they meet some new girl for the first time and after they bang her once they run like hell.
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Post by zacb »

Diminishing returns, aka marginal utility. Econ rules XD .
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Post by lavezzi »

Within the balance of nature, all forms of life have a built-in mechanism whereby they expand their energy exclusively for the purpose of prolongation and never acquire in excess of what they need. The ecosystem is an interconnected web of contained conflicts which paradoxically brings about harmony and growth. It remains this way as long as the life-forms inhabiting it remain unconscious. Human beings have evolved past a certain threshold in nature whereby they have become semi-conscious. This semi-consciousness has allowed them to innovate new efficient survival methods to the point where all their biological needs are secured with little effort.

However, with man being only partly conscious, he is still driven on a constant basis by unconscious drives for survival purposes (unbeknownst to him) even when his survival is already thoroughly secured. Every time he desires something and gets it, he experiences a brief release in which his mind is yet to conjure up anything to strive for. The feeling of release he experiences in this short period is then associated with whatever he believes provided it for him, creating innumerable attachments. In reality the release was just a temporary experience of his natural state; that which is always already the case as long as the mind is not interfering.

The real problem with human existence is not merely delusional desire, but rather delusional self-identity. These two are inseparable and one and the same process. When man is 3-5 years old, he develops self-consciousness which enhances his cognitive faculties. Metaphorically at this time he is plunged into a pool of eons worth of conditioning as he inherits a collective mind-frame which is adhered to by every other human in whatever culture he happens to originate in.

From this point onwards, he lives in a a psychologically projected dream-world where his every action is a cultic phenomenon, observed from another before him and repeated ad infinitum. His very life energy has become entangled in a knot of false self-identity because others had addressed him as being a body. He interprets himself objectively as an human (even though he exists as pure undivided subjectivity) and along with this there comes a mental representation of his apparent bodily identity which is fixated upon all the time. This apparent ego entity is forever in need because it is a fiction. It constantly strives for self-glorification in the form of thoughts, exploring it's potential future possibilities to achieve validation or superiority in one form or another. It does this in order to get attention from other humans simply because this is the only instance in which a separate identity could possibly be conceived to have any reality whatsoever.
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Post by Winston »

WTF Lavezzi? Can you put that in simpler terms or in layman's terms? Your explanation is way too abstract and requires too much concentration to follow. lol
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Post by lavezzi »

Winston wrote:WTF Lavezzi? Can you put that in simpler terms or in layman's terms? Your explanation is way too abstract and requires too much concentration to follow. lol
Basically you don't really desire any objects, because objects exist only in the mind. As long as you are pretending boundaries actually exist, you will always feel a deep sense of lack. Those things which bring comfort to us merely provide a temporary distraction from the reflective mechanism of self-contraction which creates in each moment an apparently separate consciousness, causing us to become deluded into believing we exist as a separate entity in a world of separate things. The physical world is really a magnification of an infinite source at the heart of all apparent things, and only when you come to know this will you no longer feel a sense of lack.
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Re: Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Halwick »

To put it simply, you wanted something, you fought (or spent a lot of money) to get it, you got it and felt mission accomplished. Then onward and upward to the next item to conquer.

Thomas Edison invented a lot of things and after they were invented, abandoned it feeling there's nothing more he could do with it, and left the improvements and refinement to others.

Some of the purely adventurous type, simply want to find, conquer, f**k, seed, dump, forget and move on.

Sounds like you have a lot in common with most adventurers, inventors and innovators.

On the other hand, there are some people who are satisfied with finding or inventing something, have the discipline, patience and fortitude to stay with it long term, improve it, add to it, and build an empire on it.


Winston wrote:Have any of you noticed this? When you see something you want at a store, and you buy it, then when you take it home you don't it anymore. Same goes for food at a grocery store. When you see it, you want it and it looks great and appealing. But when you get it, you suddenly don't feel like eating it that much. It happens to me all the time.

Why is that? Why is something more appealing and desirable if you don't have it than when you do?

Really weird isn't it? This would be a great question for Lavezzi.
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Contrarian Expatriate
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Re: Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Contrarian Expatriate »

Winston wrote:Have any of you noticed this? When you see something you want at a store, and you buy it, then when you take it home you don't it anymore. Same goes for food at a grocery store. When you see it, you want it and it looks great and appealing. But when you get it, you suddenly don't feel like eating it that much. It happens to me all the time.

Why is that? Why is something more appealing and desirable if you don't have it than when you do?

Really weird isn't it? This would be a great question for Lavezzi.
The official term for that is "buyers' remorse." The theories vary about it, but usually the cause is buying due to high pressure sales pitch, buying on a discount too good to pass up, or succumbing to clever marketing. These things make you think you want it, but upon further reflection, it was not what you wanted.
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Re: Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Winston »

Contrarian Expatriate wrote: The official term for that is "buyers' remorse." The theories vary about it, but usually the cause is buying due to high pressure sales pitch, buying on a discount too good to pass up, or succumbing to clever marketing. These things make you think you want it, but upon further reflection, it was not what you wanted.
I'm not talking about buyer's remorse. That would be like when you are conned into buying something expensive that you don't need by a high pressure salesperson.

I'm talking about something far simpler. For example, if you buy a candy bar, you suddenly don't want to eat it anymore. Or you take one bit and don't want to eat anymore. Or if you buy a cheesecake and eat one slice and leave the rest in the freezer for months, not eating much of it after that.
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Join my Ukrainian/Russian Women Dating Site to meet thousands of legit foreign girls at low cost!

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Re: Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Jackal »

Winston wrote:Have any of you noticed this? When you see something you want at a store, and you buy it, then when you take it home you don't it anymore. Same goes for food at a grocery store. When you see it, you want it and it looks great and appealing. But when you get it, you suddenly don't feel like eating it that much. It happens to me all the time.

Why is that? Why is something more appealing and desirable if you don't have it than when you do?

Really weird isn't it? This would be a great question for Lavezzi.
Few things are more impermanent than our moods! lol So this isn't at all surprising...

If you stop and meditate and watch your own mind for a little while, you will see just how out of control it is, full of constantly changing thoughts and perceptions...
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Post by In2dadark »

lavezzi wrote:
Winston wrote:WTF Lavezzi? Can you put that in simpler terms or in layman's terms? Your explanation is way too abstract and requires too much concentration to follow. lol
Basically you don't really desire any objects, because objects exist only in the mind. As long as you are pretending boundaries actually exist, you will always feel a deep sense of lack. Those things which bring comfort to us merely provide a temporary distraction from the reflective mechanism of self-contraction which creates in each moment an apparently separate consciousness, causing us to become deluded into believing we exist as a separate entity in a world of separate things. The physical world is really a magnification of an infinite source at the heart of all apparent things, and only when you come to know this will you no longer feel a sense of lack.
Glad Winston asked for the distillation & you delivered. I agree w/ that. I believe w/ age this comes & some young folks get it a lot quicker. To some it will never come, just look around the U.S. for example. I see so many 'seniors' acting like straight up children. In fact, many children have more common sense.

There is nothing I desire outside of myself that doesn't include the basic things & what I need to address health issues. That includes a woman. Haven't given up on love; but I think MGTOW is right about females in general terms. There are outliers in every group I suppose.
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Re: Why do you not want something anymore after you get it?

Post by Renata »

Winston wrote:Have any of you noticed this? When you see something you want at a store, and you buy it, then when you take it home you don't it anymore. Same goes for food at a grocery store. When you see it, you want it and it looks great and appealing. But when you get it, you suddenly don't feel like eating it that much. It happens to me all the time.

Why is that? Why is something more appealing and desirable if you don't have it than when you do?

Really weird isn't it? This would be a great question for Lavezzi.
I've noticed this with my kids, they make me buy stuff then after awhile they have zero interest in it. I think it's becuase the novelty wears off. I'm someone who doesn't buy things that I don't need. Even if I need a new top I will scan my wardrome first before buying anything & I may just find a shawl or another top I will alter & use. Now I've noticed if I give my kids a huge cardboard box they can fit in they tend to play with it more than something bought'. I think humans are more dynamic than static. Take my kids for instance if I give them a toy the interest in it will dwindle because it is what it is, but if I give them a huhge box then their imagination goes wild, they intantly have a ship, a house, a castle, a forte, etc. One day I gave them markers & they drew & coloured the boxes. I think humans appreciate things that they create more than things that they attain. Meals that I make from scratch are always more delicious & fulfilling that anything I buy.
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Post by RickyRetardo »

I don't actually have this problem, myself, unless what I've bought actually turns out to be terrible.
Let's get together and feel alright.
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