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Trip report from black girl in Korea (surprising)

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Trip report from black girl in Korea (surprising)

Postby Winston » Sat Jan 31, 2009 3:31 pm

I'm surprised that a black girl would be treated so well in Korea, a country I heard was very racist and ethnocentric. So I guess this is the second black person after Terrence that is having a good time in Korea?


"Hello WuMaster!

I hope that you and your family are doing well. Thanks for the birthday pictures of little Angelo! (I can't call him "Baby Angelo" anymore because he's a year old now). The Superman outfit was cute! How many people came to the party? Who was that teeny baby in some of the pictures? Is he (or she) related to little Angelo?

Here I am, trying to catch up on all the unanswered e-mail that has been piling up in my inbox. I am sooooo sorry that I haven't written back! During the beginning of December I was busy with cleaning out my apartment, putting in my notice at my two jobs, buying the plane ticket, communicating with the recruiter, etc. Busy, busy, busy! When I stepped off the plane it was just nonstop for four weeks straight! The school is on vacation now, so I'm using this time to catch up on some things.

Yes, that's right, I got the job! I was worried about getting the visa, but I realized that that was the least of my worries. I had to deal with unexpected expenses from my apartment, not getting my last paycheck from one of my jobs, and scraping together enough money for the plane ticket because of the unexpected expenses. I took a leap of faith and boarded the plane on December 12th with only sixty U.S. dollars in my pocket. The first three weeks were rough because of lack of money. Then, of my co-teachers (the one assigned to "take care of the English teacher") found out that I was flat broke. To my surprise he pulled out money from his wallet and gave it to me with no hesitation whatsoever. He even asked if I needed more! Unbelievable! I'm not talking chump change either, he lent me several hundred dollars! Of course, I happily paid him back later on when I got paid! The only other people in my life who even remotely did what he did were my parents, and that was a loooong time ago!

You're probably wondering which country I'm in? I'm currently in South Korea and have been here for a little over a month. So far, I love it here! My co-teachers are nice people, and I love the Principal and Vice-Principal to pieces! (They're like surrogate fathers, lol. Still, I respect them as my bosses.) I'm fortunate to be working for a school with such cool people! I'm trying to learn Korean, and since I'm surrounded by teachers, this is the perfect environment! The children are just wonderful! They bow to me when I walk by and some of them come to my planning room and bring little snacks for me to eat. (If one more little boy asks me for my phone number...)

When I'm not at work and when I'm out and about, things are great, too! Things aren't perfect, but I'm not worried about being attacked, robbed, raped, etc. People don't bother me. Sometimes I'm out until almost midnight, but I'm not worried because other people are usually out and about at that hour too. There are two police stations near my apartment in case things go wrong, so I'm really not worried. When I go shopping or out to a restaurant, I'm treated like a princess or something! It's unreal! Sometimes when I look lost or confused, people will pop up from nowhere to help me out. Take earlier today, for example? It happened to be "market day" in which people set up their wares outdoors up and down the local streets and sell them. I just got off the bus, and so did another man. I stopped by a display and the next thing I knew the well-dressed man who got off the bus with me offered to help me out. Just like that!

Speaking of the Korean men...heh-heh-heh...when I go shopping, usually the older men will practically trip over themselves to help me out. I went to a small supermarket last weekend and walked over where the carry-all baskets were, but before I could get to them, an older Korean man around my father's age ran to the baskets first so he could hand one to me. Two weeks ago I went shopping for an electric kettle and a laptop bag. The older Korean man at the store treated me like I was royalty or something. He even stopped what he was doing and took the time to find me a nice bag for my laptop. He even let me put my laptop in to see if it would fit. (I had gotten off from work and was on my way to my apartment, so I stopped in the store with my laptop on me.) Needless to say, at work the next day everyone noticed my cool new laptop bag.

And to think that I was scared to death to come here! Yes, I heard all the rumors and all the reasons that I shouldn't go to South Korea. Shall I list them?

1. "You're applying for a job in another country? Why can't you just find a good job here in the U.S. of A?"

I have been trying to do that for years! I finally got fed up and decided to try overseas.

2. "You're applying for a job in another country? How do you know the company is legit?"

I just took a leap of faith, and everything worked out! Besides, I have a government job, which means I'll get paid on time, I'll get my vacation leave and sick leave, etc. It also means that I'm "property of the Korean government" for a year, lol.

3. "You're going all the way over there all by yourself?"

Heck yeah! I know that I'm quiet and shy, but I'm not as weak as people think I am! If I can survive middle school, then I can go to the other side of the world and do just fine!

4. "You can't go there! Aren't you worried about how you'll be treated? Don't they hate black people?"

I figured that it couldn't be any worse than the treatment that I received in the United States! So far, except for the language barrier, I haven't had any major problems from the Koreans. I haven't been spat on, no one has told me to go back to the United States, I haven't had any hate crimes directed toward me, no one has harrassed me, no one has stalked me, etc. A teenage boy tried to holler at me, though. I thought it was funny and brushed it off because we all know how teenagers like to do silly things. I think his friends egged him on, since they were standing nearby, lol. He didn't say anything disrespectful, he just wanted to try out his English on an unsuspecting victim, lol.

Even more ironic is because I'm in an education-obsessed society, the fact that I'm learning Korean has earned me brownie points from my co-teachers, lol. (That wasn't my intention, though.) They keep encouraging me to keep on studying! In the United States, when I told people I was learning Korean, some of them looked at me as if they thought, "You don't look like someone smart enough to learn Korean..."

Another ironic thing is that here in South Korea, I don't feel the need to be Superwoman! I'm not working two or three jobs here, so I can have a more relaxed attitude toward things. I'm even dressing more feminine, and enjoying it! Sometimes the Korean men act like I'm delicate or something, so they help me out. Instead of getting mad (like I used to in the U.S.) I just go with the flow. In fact, I actually appreciate it and I think I can get used to this!

5. "There won't be many Americans there! How are you going to make any friends?"

I have Korean friends! I met them online months before I even applied for the job! (Yes, they know that I'm black! They don't care!) Now that I'm over here, they want to hang out with me! (I only have but so much free time during the weekends, people!) So far I've met one of them, a nice young lady who showed me around Seoul when we went shopping two weekends ago! We even caught a glimpse of a famous Korean actress, whose picture I snapped with my camera phone! Once the weather warms up, I'll meet my other friends ! I even invited the recruiter to have lunch and told her that I would pay for everything, and she was so surprised!

6. "What if they give you a crappy apartment?"

I live in a sweet apartment! I'll send pictures of it later on if you're interested! Even better is that I'm near both the train station an the bus stop! Just a five-minute walk and I'm there, and the train station is right across the street from the bus stop! The winter weather here is brutal, but my apartment is toasty warm and the floor is heated!

7. "You'll be homesick!"

That's what the internet is for! I meet my little sister online almost every afternoon (night for her) and we use MSN messenger. I wish she'd get a microphone, lol. Homesick? I think I got over that quickly! Besides, considering what's going on in the U.S. economically, I'm in no hurry to return any time soon.

Ok, I'll end my e-mail here. I have to look for the best deal on a plane ticket to Japan for my trip next weekend! My neighbor who used to live around the corner from me is now in Japan, so I'm going to visit her and her family! Way back in 2006, right before she left the United States, I told her that I would visit her in Japan. A few days later, I wondered, "How the heck am I going to do that? Where will I get the money?" I had no idea that years later, I would end up in South Korea, living life and doing things that I couldn't do in the United States!

Have a great weekend!"
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Postby Winston » Sat Feb 07, 2009 1:51 pm

Here are her theories on why she hasn't experienced racism in Korea:


"Hello again, WuMaster!

Yes, I'm on your mailing list. I just remembered about my blog! It chronicles my journey from September 2008 to the present. It started out as a private blog, so I'm not sure about broadcasting it to the whole world yet. The reason is that it's brutally honest and tells the good, the bad, and the ugly. (Most of the "ugly" happened in the United States before I left for South Korea.) I'm worried that my former boss will find my blog and read it. Why? Because she'll see what a good time I'm having, so it'll be like a slap in the face, lol. She thought I would come (crying) back to the United States after a few weeks in South Korea, which didn't happen. I think I'll just go ahead with the pictures after I organize them.

Yes, I've heard ALL the rumors! For years I was afraid to travel anywhere abroad because of the rumors. I got online and looked for information about black people traveling abroad. One young woman's blog was so entertaining that I made up my mind to pack up my bags and try my luck in South Korea! Yes, I was worried about racism, but I figured that I had plenty of practice in the United States dealing with that sort of thing and was quite sure I could handle whatever came my way in South Korea. Things were so bad (in the United States) that I was afraid to even set foot inside of the Asian and Hispanic ethnic stores because of the bad treatment that I received in the past. (Remember, I lived in Virginia.)

When I tell people that I'm living in South Korea and that I'm treated well, people's jaws drop in disbelief. I guess people think that I'm making things up, but if anything bad happened I would have said so. I guess it depends on which part of South Korea a person lives in. I live an hour or so from Seoul and I have access to the subway line, so I wonder if that's a factor? As far as I know, I'm the only black woman in the area, since I haven't seen any others around. (I've seen other black men though, but I think they're from Africa.)

I'm not sure how or why I lucked out, but I have a few theories? Here's the list:

1. I'm a female.

I think the fact that I'm a black female means that I'm less of a threat. Since I'm not a man, Koreans don't have to worry about locking their daughters up, lol.

2. I work in a public school.

I've heard all the hagwon horror stories, and my Korean friends were afraid for me. When they found out that I was working in a public school, they breathed a sigh of relief. I think that's another factor in the way that I'm treated in South Korea. Rumor has it that public school teachers are respected more. I'm not sure if that's true or not, though. Even the Koreans treat me differently when they find out I'm an English teacher. I had to go to the Immigration Office (again) last week to get something for my passport. There was this lone Korean man who spoke English and helped the other, um, foreigners there. When he opened my passport and saw my teaching visa, that was it! Red carpet treatment all the way!

3. I don't fit the stereotype of the loud, boisterous ghetto-fabulous black female

Seriously, I don't! I was that kid who would go all day in school without saying a word! Even now as an adult I'm usually quiet unless I absolutely have to say something! (Ironically, I can write forever, lol.) Even my Korean co-workers have commented on my quiet, calm demeanor. Some days I'm surprised that I am so quiet and calm, considering the crap that I've had to deal with over the years!

I don't think I'm the exception. I've written to other black females who are in (or have been in) South Korea and they're also having the time of their lives! They're also treated well by Koreans. I guess it's too mind-boggling for some Americans to hear that black people can travel abroad and be treated well. I keep hearing over and over, "Stay in America, you'll be treated better here than you will if you go abroad!" Now I'm beginning to wonder if that's true anymore?

I think another reason is that I'm dealing with Koreans in Korea, not Koreans who moved to America, had to set up shop, and had to deal with black people stealing their stuff so they ended up hating black people! Yes, I think there's a big difference.

I'm still in Japan now, and I'm getting ready to watch a movie now, so...

Have a great day!"
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Postby Winston » Fri Sep 17, 2010 6:12 pm

Hey check this out. That black girl in Korea who wrote me that she was having a great time there and that everyone was so friendly to her, has had a complete turn around! Look what she wrote below. Wow. What do you think happened? Why would they harass and stalk her? I don't get it.

What do you all make of it?

-----------------------------------------------------

"Hello Winston Wu!

I hope you and your family are well. I have a question? Your site is kind of popular and I'm quite sure you receive a lot of criticism from people who do not like what you have to say. How do you deal with cyberstalkers and harassers? (Have you had this problem?) It turned out that it was a huge problem in South Korea to the point that I had to leave early before finishing out my contract. As far as countries where people are happy, you and your cultural advisor were right, South Korea should not be on the list! I have never seen so many miserable-looking people in my life. (This was just walking down the street on a regular basis.)

What happened to me was that I had a website and a blog. I guess certain South Koreans coulndn't stand how much of a great time I was having in South Korea, so I became the target of harassment, both online and offline. I took down my website and blog, thinking the harassment would stop, but things got worse. It was as if a hidden camera was following me everywhere, watching my every move, waiting for me to screw up so the harassers would have more fodder to use for harassment.

Now I am back in America trying to get some R & R and the harassers are still at it! I'm at my parents' place, so isn't this trespassing? The apartment in South Korea wasn't mine, but this is my parents' house! Any hidden cameras or whatever are not legal!

I would like to warn anyone going to South Korea to beware of cyberstalkers and harassers! Better yet, I would advise them not to go to South Korea at all! There are hundreds of other countries on this planet to go to where people won't stalk and harass them!

Part of the reason why I went to South Korea (besides work and travel) was because of the large Christian population. Now I realize that a lot of that was just smoke and mirrors. It was as if members of the church were in on the harassment, too. Even church wasn't a safehaven!

Please warn people about South Korea! If you need more information or examples of what I went through during my time there, let me know and I will gladly send it do you! True, some people are happier abroad, but not in South Korea! Even some military people complain about their South Korea assignment!

Have a great weekend!"
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Postby wuxi » Fri Sep 17, 2010 6:40 pm

Reading this ladies korean trip report is very encouraging news. I've heard the average ESL teacher only lasts like three or four months in korea so nice to hear something positive for a change. However, I think people that have a high energy personality seem to tolerate the stress of moving to a new country to work much better others, thats been my observation.

Heres an article by someone that didn't like korea.

http://www.roadjunky.com/article/647/te ... outh-korea
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Postby ladislav » Fri Sep 17, 2010 11:43 pm

There are exceptions to the rule and this lady who had a great time is an exception. And yes, being a female and possibly looking like some famous singer ( in the minds of Koreans) could be a plus. They may like to have a token black person there. Maybe the numbers of blacks are not big enough yet. Also, people who experience extreme racism, such as physical attacks/open harrassment or attempts on life are the minority. Most people seem to experience this:

1) Just dull life with most sullen locals wanting very little to do with them and not giving a rat's a## about them. You are just being tolerated as a nusiance. Most adults anywhere are not vocal about foreigners/other races. In the Confucian Asia, most people just do not want to talk to you because - they do not speak English and you cannot possibly speak the local language. The spread of English as the world language movement has actually been in many ways detrimental. It makes even smallest attempt to integrate and function in society more difficult, not easier. Instead of say, Chinese/Japanese/Koreans just speaking to you in Chinese/Japanese/Korean and you trying to learn it because it is THEIR country after all, or them trying to listen to you and explain things in a mixture of signs and local language, many just run away or walk silently and glumly on ignoring you. Their English, they think, is not good enough or none at all. Which is true- after 10 years of learning English, an average E. Asian cannot even say " The bathroom is there!".

The same phenomenon happens in Montreal as well. It shows that you do not have to be of another race to be treated like an outsider.
Most racism is thus expressed in people just ignoring/avoiding you; when you ask for directions- in their language- they just walk by or sometimes mumble something like "I do not speak English" even if you speak Chinese/Japanese/Korean, etc. If you try and speak the local language, some will be nice, some will still ignore you and many will answer in lousy English.
2) Occasionally there are mocking looks, pouted mouths and avoidance of eye contact. Some grumbles, suspicious or glum, lowered eyes, and some angry flashes of the same eyes. Some stores/shops/bars do not want you in there. Some let you in but are not happy about you being there. Some taxis will not stop for you- they cannot speak English- even if you speak the local language- an impossibility to them. How can a cat bark?
3) There will be a minority of semi-OK locals who want to show hospitality, practice their English, invite you home- these are nice. Also, if you learn the language, you will have a superficial group of people who will be inviting you home, hanging out with you and seem to be like friends. But there will be little help from them usually if you really need something.
4) A cold stone wall will appear if you try to integrate/marry/date/get jobs outside of English teaching or rent apartments/buy property/do business unless you are abundantly capitalized. The wall is somewhat manageable but not overcomeable. The wall will become even higher if you try to deal with the legalities of their very xenophobic societies, having mixed kids there with any decent future except as entertainment pieces or freaks and them being accepted by their peers. IBM expat CEOs on generous expense accounts with kids at international schools will again swear that the country is lovely but we are not talking about those few people. We are talking about the average Joe/Jane Foreign Devil. Very little is written about how they fare in the PC world we are living in now.


Sometimes, if you are very attractive or very rich, you can make it into a tiny handful of foreign talents/business tycoons who speak the local language and have made it. These have been there at the right place in the right time and will swear by God and all Saints that:

there is no discrimination against them at all
that the people are lovely and treat them like Gods
that the country is wonderful and they love it.

Getting advice from people like that is like getting an advice from Bill Gates that anyone can be a billionaire if he works hard and that there are many opportunities for all of us in the US. Which is all BS. You need the right combination of talent, luck ( absolutely crucial- and most people cannot control that) and hard work. All those elements need to be in the right measure.

For the majority of the "White Devils" or Black/Hispanic "Devils" life will just be lonely and drab with us just being a cyst that needs to be ignored.

As in the US, most racism is not violent lynching or you getting beat up. It is just about you being treated as an outsider and not being able to normally socialize, date, get good jobs and take your rightful place among the people based on the content of your character. No one likes that. We are social animals and we like to be part of a group. After a while it starts grating on your nerves and you may develop a complex. And then you leave.

This is why most of us "Foreign Devils" do not end up staying in those countries unless super rich, super lucky, or super attractive/talented and not threatening.

Being a tourist for a couple of days/weeks is of course a whole different story. Or being a guest English teacher- an American for a year is also not a good indicator of how the locals really are like.
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Postby Winston » Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:21 am

Ladislav, Wuxi,

Did you read the last update from her above where she had a complete turn around and everything in Korea went south? You must have missed it.

I was asking why that happened to her?

Btw Ladislav, I'm Asian and I get treated the way you described in oriental countries. I get nasty cold stares from anyone who is not elderly. I can't figure it out. The only explanation I can think of is that they notice that I'm not repressed, miserable and motivated by fear 24/7 like the rest of the orientals are, and that bothers them. Or I act too open and direct and that is improper in oriental/east asian culture?

You've met me Ladislav, many times. Clearly I do not have that vibe/expression/attitude that orientals usually have. Could that be turning them off?

Also, how come in rich countries like US/Canada and East Asia, only little kids and old people are truly relaxed and easy to talk to, while people in between are hella stuck up and uptight? Do you ever notice that?
Last edited by Winston on Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:54 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Winston » Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:48 am

Here is another update from her. Her link below describes her experience in Korea being harassed and stalked.


"Hello Winston Wu!

Thank you for your quick reply! As for why anyone would harass me, and as for what I had that they wanted? I was living a great life and I guess the harassers couldn't stand it, so they tried to make my time in South Korea as miserable as possible. As for why I couldn't get help? I was a non-Korean in Korea! Why would anyone help me? Even Koreans in Korea had trouble getting help!

Your description hit the nail on the head! I was open, carefree, and a noncomformist and it got me in trouble by attracting negative attention. I started a blog and will tell about my experience with harassment there. Instead of a post on your forum, I will give you the address of my blog so people can look at it for themselves.

http://stopharassmentnow.blogspot.com/

Thank you for your time! Have a great day!"
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Postby globetrotter » Sat Sep 18, 2010 7:59 am

My experience is not like ladislav's. I have found the Chinese to be fairly friendly and a bit helpful at times. Being looked over, passed over, ignored - this does not happen to me. I speak very basic Chinese, so I can try to speak, count, get around, etc. Taxi drivers speak to me in Chinese, assume I understand them, and we get the information conveyed and off we go. This happens in multiple cities where I am just a tourist and no one knows I teach. One guy, pleasantly drunk on New Years in Feb, was a treat. We sent off my lantern and he drove off into the night.

Usually in a restaurant I order, in Chinese, they understand me and dinner is brought as I wish. Every once in a while they call in a relative or friend to help translate.

Usually this is a 22 yo girl, pretty and bilingual.

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Postby The_Adventurer » Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:38 am

I like to think I'm very attractive. ;) I am not (yet) rich, but my experiences have been nothing like Ladislav's as well, or at least they have been closer to those he describes as reserved for the CEOs. I always get treated extremely well. I am still very close friends with my core group from Korea. We're like family. They take the expense to call me, even when I am other countries. The girlfriend I had in Korea is talking about coming to visit me even now. It is far from superficial.

Sure, older folks ignored me on the street, but it is not like I tried to talk to them either. Once I was introduced to people, usually by the group I was with, things warmed up very quickly. I was always invited to stay in people's homes and so on. I would doubt that some of it because they value an English speaking presence around, but that cannot account for all of it.

In China, I speak like three words of Chinese and yet people on the street come up to me, out of the blue, and start talking to me as though they expect I will understand every word. I often walk in those areas where guys are just hanging out in front of somewhere shooting the breeze and they always say hello and try to talk. I shop by myself quite often and the people in stores seem awfully happy I am there and try to talk to me. When they realize I don't speak any Chinese they resort to gestures. Some just keep talking anyway.

People have always been very helpful. Just today I was in the supermarket and some guy who spoke English just started helping me, telling me what each product was and helped me all the way to check out. I once tried to buy cigarettes in a store by myself. A couple of old guys tried to help me, even though I couldn't understand anything they said. The girls in the KFC near me seem very happy when I came in there. I order by the "point and choose" method and two of them always try to speak a word or two of English. The girls in UBC I go to often also seem very smiley and helpful. They all speak to me in Chinese, even though they must know I don't understand. The people in the lobby in my building are the same way. I see other people walk in and out without a word, but me, they always say hello and sometimes try to talk with me.

I am learning Chinese now, so I will see how things differ when I can hold a conversation.
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Postby Rock » Sat Sep 18, 2010 11:39 am

If I compare all the places I have lived at least a few months - USA, UK, Norway, Colombia, Brazil, Hong Kong, Thailand, and Taiwan - the best overall treatment I got from the locals was Taiwan and Colombia. But in Colombia, I didn't stay that long (just a few months in several cities) so my experience could be considered superficial. However, I've lived on and off in Taiwan for a very long time. I passed the superficial stage a long time ago.

My experience in Taiwan has been very different from how Ladislav describes East Asia, much much more positive.

As for Korea, I've heard different things from different people. I once rented a room to an American girl here in Taiwan who had just completed a 2 year English teaching stint at a private cram school in Seoul. She told me she felt that the white guys did OK but foreign women and minorities got treated pretty badly. She hated it. She also told me that she knew of an American black guy who applied to her school from overseas (apparently with no photo) and was hired on a one year renewable contract that included round trip air fare. But when he showed-up to register, the school canceled his contract immediately and sent him right back. Word got around fast and everyone agreed that he was fired for being black.

I've also read about some Koreans who have banned together on the Internet to harass English teachers and other foreigners who they feel are up to know good - sleeping around with their women, doing drugs, etc. I think your friend might have been a victim of one of these overzealous groups. If things are going well for you as a western foreigner in South Korea, perhaps its best to be low profile about it.

As for China, I had 3 Kenyan female friends who all taught English in 3rd tier cities, one of whom I visited in her city (the others I knew in Beijing). They all told me they got treated quite well by the locals and from what I observed when I visited the one in Xingtai, Hebei, I believe it. None of them were keen on dating the local guys though, lol.
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Postby wuxi » Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:30 pm

The psychological profile of koreans is different than most countries because the population is seriously overworked and made to conform to a ridgid set of values. Anyone that deviates from what is considered "normal" is shunned.

A college buddy(caucasion) of mine taught english in korea for three years and married a korean woman. He told me whenever he was in public with his wife and kids other koreans thought his wife was a prostitute and there kids were bastard children. The idea that they loved each other and were married was totally out of the question to most koreans.

Chinese(from China) are much different because communism tends to make people complacent. If you want to be successful in China you need to be part of the club(communist party) working hard won't get you very far. Also, being talented won't get you far either unless you have friends in high places. As a result chinese people are more laid back and are more tolerant of foreigners. Chinese people from the smaller cities are usually the friendliest.
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Postby The_Adventurer » Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:01 am

I probably should mention that I was not in Korea to teach English and did not work in any school. I did hear stories of foreign teachers being given crappy apartments and being treated badly by some of the smaller academies. I also know that, where younger children are involved, many schools will not hire a black teacher, as they claim children are afraid of them. (Kids seemed to like me, though, so I don't know if that is truth or perception)

I also knew about this group that banned together to harass foreign teachers. It was making quite a bit of news when I was there. I should be countered with the fact, though, that the incidents which prompted this group involved foreign teachers throwing wild parties, getting Korean girls drunk to the point of throwing off their clothes, sleeping with them and posting it all on the internet. There were also reports of a forum where foreign teachers were telling their buddies back home they should come to Korea and teach because it is so easy to get laid. And, yes, there were stories of drugs and even some teachers sleeping with middle school aged students.

I suspect that many of these incidents may lead one to have a very negative view of a teacher before they even meet them.

I think jealousy may play a large part of this girl's story. Many Koreans work hard and have nothing to show for it, so they might resent someone who seems to have it so easy and is constantly enjoying themselves.
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Postby ladislav » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:28 pm

A college buddy(caucasion) of mine taught english in korea for three years and married a korean woman. He told me whenever he was in public with his wife and kids other koreans thought his wife was a prostitute and there kids were bastard children. The idea that they loved each other and were married was totally out of the question to most koreans.



Now how would he (or you) address a hypothetical person who would post and say- Nothing like that ever happened to me! That guy is just imagining things! Or- he is just a jackass. People are lovely in Korea! I had a great time! And I lived there 5 years and I think the people are great!

Because every time I post any kind of warning about non American racism and hatred, there is a bozo or two that calls me a jackass and tells me it was MY fault.
A brain is a terrible thing to wash!
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Postby wuxi » Sun Sep 19, 2010 3:55 pm

ladislav wrote:
A college buddy(caucasion) of mine taught english in korea for three years and married a korean woman. He told me whenever he was in public with his wife and kids other koreans thought his wife was a prostitute and there kids were bastard children. The idea that they loved each other and were married was totally out of the question to most koreans.



Now how would he (or you) address a hypothetical person who would post and say- Nothing like that ever happened to me! That guy is just imagining things! Or- he is just a jackass. People are lovely in Korea! I had a great time! And I lived there 5 years and I think the people are great!

Because every time I post any kind of warning about non American racism and hatred, there is a bozo or two that calls me a jackass and tells me it was MY fault.


I should clarify my friends experience. He had a very postive view of koreans in general. Its just that some koreans would gossip about him and his wife behind there backs. Don't get me wrong people in western countries do the same thing.
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Postby Rock » Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:41 pm

Its not just white and black westerners acting over-the-top in Korea which gives us a bad name. Check out this email sent by a new employee, a Korean American, on his second week at a cushy expat posting in Carlyle, the private equity firm with lots of heavy weight Washingtonian stake holders.

The email was sent to just a handful of his former colleagues from Merrill. From what he says, it sounded extremely easy back then for a young ABK to pull lots of quality. But then again, I don't think he was there very long and was extremely buzzed-up on his honeymoon period at the job which came to an abrupt halt. The email went viral around the globe and within 24 hours of sending it, he was canned.

Message-ID: <812F5C217425D311A83100508>
From: Peter Chung
Subject: LIVING LIKE A KING
Date: Tue, 15 May 2001 20:26:21 -0400
MIME-Version: 1.0
X-Mailer: Internet Mail Service (5.5.2653.19)
Content-Type: text/plain

So I've been in Korea for about a week and a half now and what can I say, LIFE IS GOOD....

I've got a spanking brand new 2000 sq. foot 3 bedroom apt. with a 200 sq. foot terrace running the entire length of my apartment with a view overlooking Korea's main river and nightline......Why do I need 3 bedrooms? Good question,.... the main bedroom is for my queen size bed,...where CHUNG is going to f**k every hot chick in Korea over the next 2 years (5 down, 1,000,000,000 left to go).... the second bedroom is for my harem of chickies, and the third bedroom is for all of you fuckers when you come out to visit my ass in Korea. I go out to Korea's finest clubs, bars and lounges pretty much every other night on the weekdays and everyday on the weekends to (I think in about 2 months, after I learn a little bit of the buyside business I'll probably go out every night on the weekdays). I know I was a stud in NYC but I pretty much get about, on average, 5-8 phone numbers a night and at least 3 hot chicks that say that they want to go home with me every night I go out. I love the buyside,.... I have bankers calling me everyday with opportunties and they pretty much cater to my every whim - you know (golfing events, lavish dinners, a night out clubbing). The guys I work with are also all chilll - I live in the same apt building as my VP and he drives me around in his Porsche (1 of 3 in all of Korea) to work and when we go out. What can I say,.... live is good,... CHUNG is KING of his domain here in Seoul.....

So,.... all of you fuckers better keep in touch and start making plans to come out and visit my ass ASAP, I'll show you guys an unbelievable time....My contact info is below.... Oh, by the way,... someone's gotta start fedexing me boxes of domes,...I brought out about 40 but I think I'll run out of them by Saturday.....

Laters,
CHUNG

Peter Chung
The Carlyle Group
Suite 1009, CCMM Bldg.
12, Yoido-dong, Youngdeungpo-ku
Seoul 150-010, Korea
Tel: (822) 2004-8412
Fax: (822) 2004-8440
email: pchung@thecarlylegroup.co .kr
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