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$200,000 saved up - where should I go?

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Hero
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Post by Hero » February 13th, 2014, 3:38 am

Wow, Boxman, you have a great adventure ahead of you! It sounds like these are the worst of times and the best of times for you. Like the song says, every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end. Whatever happens, enjoy the ride. And count yourself fortunate - not many guys have the options that you have.

PeterAndrewNolan
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Re: $200,000 saved up - where should I go?

Post by PeterAndrewNolan » February 13th, 2014, 2:32 pm

Boxman wrote:A broken marriage, an unhappy job, the death of my mother and a series of failed relationships since my divorce have brought me to this. I'm leaving this place (the United States) to start over abroad. There's nothing for me here anymore. My only hope is to start over, in a completely different place so that I can build a completely new life.

I may have ended up 45 and childless, with no real family or friends left, and nothing keeping me rooted to this place... but one thing I did end up with is money. I was never materialistic and always tended to save and invest my extra money, a habit that has left me with over $200,000 in cash and several rental properties bringing in about $2000/month (average net profit - month to month it varies pretty wildly). I can hire a property management company to handle my rental units but that will lower my average monthly income to around $1500 or less.

I dream of quitting my job and settling down somewhere far away, to live off my $200k nest egg and my rental income. Where would be the best place to stretch my dollar but still have access to attractive women that speak a little english? I'm open to the possibilities and haven't my heart set on any one place. I have loved all kinds of women in my life... no hangups about race or anything. I just like my women feminine, loyal and sweet.

So gents if you had $200k and some modest monthly income, where would you go?

PS: If it's relevant, I'm white, still have all my hair, slightly above average height, and in ok shape (not fat, not ripped either).
I would head to eastern europe myself....but then again I am already here. Romania is good but I do not know if they will take you.

You can also go to south east asia.

If you want to set up in Fiji we now sell all the services to resettle there. There are worse places to live than Fiji. Mr Emosi and I decided we are going to show men some leadership by example as to how to support mens rights via creating useful businesses. Mr. Emosi is well connected to the Fiji Government and we have the full support of the government in what we are doing in Fiji. One of the few places in the world where the government is openly working with the men in the mens rights area.

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SilverEnergy
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Post by SilverEnergy » February 13th, 2014, 4:49 pm

HouseMD wrote:If you want to safely never work again, I'd be careful tapping your nest egg any more than you have to. Realistically, I'd pull 4% out a year and leave the rest invested, while relying primarily on your properties for income. You won't be able to manage your own property realistically, so you're going to need a management company. This gives you $8,000/year in drawdown from your nest egg, and $1,500 a month from your properties, for a total of $2,166.66 per month to live off of, more than enough for most of SEA or SA.
I am a pro-real estate person myself.

Hardly anyone on this website besides you even loves real estate investing.

The OP could definitely invest in real estate and just live off his cash flow because he needs to save and invest wisely the rest of it.

He should invest in real estate, gold, silver, water storages and food storages.
"Allow me to show you the Power Cosmic!" - Silver Surfer

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Adama
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Re:

Post by Adama » November 30th, 2017, 1:16 am

Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
February 11th, 2014, 8:18 am
$200,000 is a good start, but not enough to embark on an early retirement. If I were you, I would continue to work for five years, but integrate foreign travel into your routine. Perhaps take 4 exploratory vacations per year.

Perhaps in 5 years you could have $300,000 or more, a health care policy that treats you while overseas, and a better idea of where you want to settle down.

Sounds like you are on the cusp, but I know guys like you who ended up homeless in Ukraine after several years of spending their nest eggs like never before.
Seriously? That much is needed?

I wonder if those men were reckless spenders.

Contrarian Expatriate
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Re: Re:

Post by Contrarian Expatriate » November 30th, 2017, 1:35 am

Adama wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 1:16 am
Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
February 11th, 2014, 8:18 am
$200,000 is a good start, but not enough to embark on an early retirement. If I were you, I would continue to work for five years, but integrate foreign travel into your routine. Perhaps take 4 exploratory vacations per year.

Perhaps in 5 years you could have $300,000 or more, a health care policy that treats you while overseas, and a better idea of where you want to settle down.

Sounds like you are on the cusp, but I know guys like you who ended up homeless in Ukraine after several years of spending their nest eggs like never before.
Seriously? That much is needed?

I wonder if those men were reckless spenders.
It depends if you want to live in the city center, in the outskirts, or a small town. Will you want to travel? Will you want to get married? Will you want to have assisted care when you can no longer care for yourself?

$200,000 will go quickly if you are no longer taking in income. I advocate saving to the point where you can live off of the interest. Ukraine has high interest rates, but the banking industry is a high risk one too.

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Adama
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Re: Re:

Post by Adama » November 30th, 2017, 3:03 pm

Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 1:35 am
Adama wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 1:16 am
Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
February 11th, 2014, 8:18 am
$200,000 is a good start, but not enough to embark on an early retirement. If I were you, I would continue to work for five years, but integrate foreign travel into your routine. Perhaps take 4 exploratory vacations per year.

Perhaps in 5 years you could have $300,000 or more, a health care policy that treats you while overseas, and a better idea of where you want to settle down.

Sounds like you are on the cusp, but I know guys like you who ended up homeless in Ukraine after several years of spending their nest eggs like never before.
Seriously? That much is needed?

I wonder if those men were reckless spenders.
It depends if you want to live in the city center, in the outskirts, or a small town. Will you want to travel? Will you want to get married? Will you want to have assisted care when you can no longer care for yourself?

$200,000 will go quickly if you are no longer taking in income. I advocate saving to the point where you can live off of the interest. Ukraine has high interest rates, but the banking industry is a high risk one too.
But what about the additional income of $1500 a month?

I wonder what he finally decided top do. It has been over three years now.

Contrarian Expatriate
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Re: Re:

Post by Contrarian Expatriate » November 30th, 2017, 4:48 pm

Adama wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 3:03 pm
Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 1:35 am
Adama wrote:
November 30th, 2017, 1:16 am
Contrarian Expatriate wrote:
February 11th, 2014, 8:18 am
$200,000 is a good start, but not enough to embark on an early retirement. If I were you, I would continue to work for five years, but integrate foreign travel into your routine. Perhaps take 4 exploratory vacations per year.

Perhaps in 5 years you could have $300,000 or more, a health care policy that treats you while overseas, and a better idea of where you want to settle down.

Sounds like you are on the cusp, but I know guys like you who ended up homeless in Ukraine after several years of spending their nest eggs like never before.
Seriously? That much is needed?

I wonder if those men were reckless spenders.
It depends if you want to live in the city center, in the outskirts, or a small town. Will you want to travel? Will you want to get married? Will you want to have assisted care when you can no longer care for yourself?

$200,000 will go quickly if you are no longer taking in income. I advocate saving to the point where you can live off of the interest. Ukraine has high interest rates, but the banking industry is a high risk one too.
But what about the additional income of $1500 a month?

I wonder what he finally decided top do. It has been over three years now.
$1500 a month in rental income would make a huge difference since he would not have to cut into his next egg as much.

More than doable with that income stream.

MrMan
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Re: $200,000 saved up - where should I go?

Post by MrMan » December 1st, 2017, 2:58 am

What do you do for a living. If you have $200,000 and you are below 45, you may be able to keep a break, but you are probably going to have to keep working. If you lived somewhere on $1500 a month, you might be able to do that until one of your properties needs a major repair or until inflation rose in the country you live in.

When I lived in Jakarta in the early 2000's right after the currency devaluation, I went to the fancy buffet at the country club for $2. I could eat beef bulgogi at a Korean restaurant for about the same price. Breaking a 50,000 and later 100,000 was a big deal. I could find a pair of men's slacks for 60,000 or 70,000 rupiah which was about $6 to $7. Now, it seems like prices are tend to be between 30% to 50% less. But somethings are more expensive. They have a lot of options on the lower end, street food, where you can spend much less. Taxis are cheap. But if you want to eat at a steak house for American food, it's a bit more expensive than the US.

What I'm saying is if you move to a country where you can by 20 times as much for a dollar, don't expect it to last forever. You could calculate the inflation rate of the dollar and the currency you are looking at and see what the difference will be like in so many years if you get a spreadsheet. We should also consider that the US is not very fiscally responsible with it's borrowings and the fiat financial system is an experiment of the 20th century that hasn't been tested that long from a historical perspective, with a recent recreation of the sytem in the 1970's, which was less than 40 years ago.

If you have a degree, you could teach English. That's an relatively easy job to get in a lot of Asian countries. It isn't the highest paid, but it is pretty easy. If you are qualified to do some kind of engineering or tech job, you may be able to do that. Of course, $200K is fine to travel around to different countries for a while. You could also look into places where you could invest it and make money back.

I've spent a lot of time in Indonesia, and I would say Indonesia is not that place. If you are married to an Indonesia, you could invest in business in your wife's name, which adds 'divorce risk' to the risk profile of the investment. Otherwise, you can invest in apartments. The Jakarta area may have a bubble right now, though the apartment-buying-age population is exploding and some in the industry think growth is keeping up with new construction. They sell the apartments at a discount before they build the building, starting before they even lay the foundation. The price is cheaper before the building goes up. It's okay to do this with an established construction company. You need to put together about $1.7 million in Jakarta to start a foreign-owned corporation. Those with a permanent residency (which isn't as strong as a greencard) can be self-employed. I hear those married to locals can get it after some time working in Indonesia.

There are other countries that will let you buy 'air space', apartments, but not land. You could look at those countries if you want to invest, unless you can find some that let you actually buy land and want to live there. One of our posters said he had an apartment in Georgia, a country where people are white and the prices are cheap. If you wanted to invest in real estate in the Philippines, at least you could speak English there. Singapore speaks English, but their land prices are high, and because of that reason it is expensive to live there. Food isn't too expensive compared to the US depending on where you eat.

Legal systems are not as strong once you get out of the Anglosphere and Europe. Anglo case law is the most predictable.

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