Why being a Loser may be a price worth paying (Stoic philosophy)

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Winston
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Why being a Loser may be a price worth paying (Stoic philosophy)

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"We’re so afraid to be seen as losers that we're willing to suffer in exchange for other people’s approval. What a sad state of being in, as by putting our money on external goods, we become dependent on them and gamble away our chances of being happy and free. According to Epictetus, we must be willing to let go of what he called “lesser things.” And if that means that we become total losers in the eyes of society, then that’s a price worth paying.

This video doesn’t advocate for neglecting oneself or self-harm: quite the contrary, from a Stoic point of view. It explores the philosophy of Epictetus, showing a different way to determine what’s important in life, the concept of “being a loser,” and why being “seen” as a loser doesn’t have to be a bad thing. "Be a Loser if Need Be | The Philosophy of Epictetus""

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Winston
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Re: Why being a Loser may be a price worth paying (Stoic philosophy)

Post by Winston »

Have any of you noticed that in groups the vibes from the group affects you and stay with you afterward for a few hours at least? So hanging with a group is not consequence-free.

The Priceless Benefits of Not Belonging



"Solitude is dangerous. It's very addictive. It becomes a habit after you realize how peaceful and calm it is. It's like you don't want to deal with people anymore because they drain your energy." - Jim Carrey

It never ceases to amaze me: we all love ourselves more than other people, but care more about their opinions than our own." - Marcus Aurelius

“Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation. Your character is what you really are while your reputation is merely what others think you are.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDGOZWp5iGk

Jeffrey Blagg
1 year ago
Does anyone else feel that those of us that love and accept others as they are without judgment are usually the ones that are ostracized because of the judgments of others? Keep on existing sigmas! Maybe one day we can have a meal together? (Portland, Oregon)

Happier Abroad - Expat Living and Dating Overseas
7 minutes ago (edited)
Yes because most people are very judgmental so they do not vibe with people who are nonjudgmental and authentic. Judgmental people never like me either even if I am super nice to them. People and groups have an animal instinct and can sense if you are different than them, even if you try to act normal.
Check out my FUN video clips in Russia and SE Asia and Female Encounters of the Foreign Kind video series and Full Russia Trip Videos!

Join my Dating Site to meet thousands of legit foreign girls at low cost!

"It takes far less effort to find and move to the society that has what you want than it does to try to reconstruct an existing society to match your standards." - Harry Browne
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Winston
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Re: Why being a Loser may be a price worth paying (Stoic philosophy)

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Hated, Ignored, Rejected & Happy: A Video for Outcasts (based on Black Mirror’s ‘Nosedive’)

Do we need a good reputation to be happy? (WARNING: THIS VIDEO CONTAINS SPOILERS)

The Black Mirror episode ‘Nosedive’ takes place in a futuristic world in which reputation is the main currency. The story revolves around a young woman named Lacie who desperately wants to raise her social credibility, so she can apply for a residence in a fancy community.

This credibility is based on how other people rate you, on social media, and in ‘real-life’, and is measured on a scale of 1 to 5. Your rating decides what kind of lifestyle you can apply for. When you’re a high 4, for example, you belong to the social elite and will get access to the best housing, the best transport, the most prestigious social circle, and higher mating opportunities.

But when you’re a 3 or lower, you’re seen as outcast, and many societal doors are closed to you: companies won’t hire you, people don’t want to hang out with you, and you’re deemed to live in a low-class neighborhood.

The story of Nosedive shows us how much we value our reputation, and how far we’re willing to go to establish a good reputation and maintain it. It also shows how fragile our reputation actually is (and for the most part out of our control), and that it takes tremendous work to achieve and maintain.

But, what if we don’t care about our reputation? What if we become outcasts that are ignored, rejected, and even hated? Does that mean that we’re doomed to misery?

Not at all.

This video explores the reasons why based on the Black Mirror episode ‘Nosedive’ and ancient philosophy.

Check out my FUN video clips in Russia and SE Asia and Female Encounters of the Foreign Kind video series and Full Russia Trip Videos!

Join my Dating Site to meet thousands of legit foreign girls at low cost!

"It takes far less effort to find and move to the society that has what you want than it does to try to reconstruct an existing society to match your standards." - Harry Browne
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